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February 2020

Dross? Dunghills? Or Musical Treasures? Rethinking Collectors and Collections of Seventeenth-Century Pop Songs

Thursday, February 20 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E Young Dr East
Los Angeles, 90095 United States
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Annual William & Lois Matthews Samuel Pepys Lecture Angela McShane (Head of Research, Wellcome Collection; Associate Fellow, History, University of Warwick) Pop-music collections are remarkable things: expressing individual taste and evidencing engagement with the products of the music industry, they become nostalgic compilations almost from the first moment of their construction. Judging how far an individual’s collection represents the popular music scene is relatively simple, since charts and catalogues, categorized by genre, ordered by performer, date of release and overall…

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CMRS Research Workshop

Tuesday, February 11 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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"Michael Servetus, his clashes with deans Tagault and Lax, and their serious consequences: his anonymous works from 1538 ahead, and his exile from Spain in 1527" Miguel Gonzalez Ancin (Independent Scholar) This paper examines the medical, grammatical, biblical and poetical works by Michael Servetus - studied by servetian González Echeverría- which were printed anonymously in the print-shop of Jean Frellon in Lyon. The main reason for their anonymity was the fierce trial that Servetus suffered in 1538  by the Univ.…

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California Medieval History Seminar, Winter 2020

Saturday, February 8 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classroom 3, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino, CA 91108 United States
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The Winter 2020 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. These are the researchers and their papers that will be discussed: Maya Maskerinec (University of…

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Annual Colloquium in Armenian Studies

Friday, February 7
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Graduate Student Colloquium in Armenian Studies University of California, Los Angeles Royce Hall 314 February 7, 2020 9:30 – 10:00 Breakfast 10:00 – 10:10 Opening Remarks Anatolii Tokmantcev (Director of the 2020 Graduate Student Colloquium in Armenian Studies Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA) Dr. S. Peter Cowe (Narekatsi Professor of Armenian Studies, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA) Panel 1: Homeland and Diaspora: Displacement and its Effects Chair: Armen Adamian, Ethnomusicology, UCLA 10:10 – 10:30 Ani Shahinian, “The Martyrdom of Awag…

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“Let the Whole World Praise the Saint”: Medieval Songs for St. Nicholas

Tuesday, February 4 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Mary Channen Caldwell (Assistant Professor of Music, University of Pennsylvania). St. Nicholas was unquestionably one of the most popular and accessible saints in medieval Europe, serving as patron saint to everyone from sailors and unmarried women, to clerics, children, and repentant thieves. Due to his role as “everyman’s saint,” Nicholas was, from an early period, widely celebrated in song, drama, and literature in many forms and languages. Among the plentiful music composed in his name,…

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January 2020

Early History of Africa Symposium: New Narratives for a History of Connections and Brokers

Thursday, January 30 @ 1:15 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This symposium presents an opportunity to think about different methodologies and different ways of writing history when faced with the challenge of sources. Can we still use the traditional narrative within a connected history of brokers, frontiers, and cultural transfers, or should we be thinking about different ways of telling history, developing, for instance, network narratives or fragmented narratives?  Organized by Zrinka Stahuljak (Comparative Literature and French and Francophone Studies; CMRS Director; UCLA) and Stephanie Bosch Santana (Comparative Literature, UCLA).…

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Law and Communal Identity in the Early Medieval Mediterranean

Thursday, January 23 - Saturday, January 25
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Conference Organized by Jessica Goldberg (History, UCLA) and Luke Yarbrough (Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, UCLA). Click here to see the complete conference schedule, how to register, and further details >> Preliminary drafts of petition to the Fatimid caliph al-Mustanṣir (11th c. CE). Cambridge University Library, T-S Ar. 30.278, recto. Reproduced by kind permission of the Syndics of Cambridge University Library. This conference investigates how law shaped the boundaries of communities in the early medieval period in the Byzantine,…

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In League with Infidels: Sharifs, Persians, Turks and The Renaissance Popes as “Lords and Masters of the World Game”

Wednesday, January 22 @ 12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Pop-Up Workshop Celine Dauverd (Associate Professor, History, University of Colorado Boulder) The Fall of Constantinople shook the western world. But it also forced the head of the Christian world to reinvent itself. Countless Muslim raids over the Italian peninsula coupled with the need to preserve Rome as a sovereign city-state compelled the papacy to design a new imperial theory. Ignoring the precepts of the bull In coenia domeni and demonstrating instead doctrinal inconsistencies, the rising tide of the Turks…

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CMRS Research Workshop

Tuesday, January 21 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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“The Hypocrisy of Signs: Hermeneutics of Action and Belief in the Aftermath of the Sephardic Diaspora (Italy and Catholic Europe, XVI-XVII centuries)” David Sebastiani (PhD Candidate, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa, Italy) Each CMRS Research Workshop is based on a pre-circulated research paper that the presenter—who may be a CMRS faculty member, associate, affiliate, or graduate student—wishes to discuss with colleagues. All attendees must read the paper under consideration and be prepared to contribute to the discussion. Click here to register…

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Hydrophilic Archives: Early Handmade Paper in Unstable Environments

Thursday, January 16 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Richard & Mary Rouse Annual History of the Book Lecture Joshua Calhoun (Associate Professor of English, University of Wisconsin, Madison) Click here to register to attend. Paper loves water, but the hydrophilic property of paper is both a feature and a bug: it cannot be created without water, and it can be easily destroyed by water. This talk explores the revolutionary, vulnerable qualities of early handmade paper and considers the ecological resources we use to preserve the documentary evidence we…

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William Caxton’s Multilingualism: The Claims of French and Dutch, English and Kentish

Tuesday, January 14 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture This lecture by Professor Ad Putter (Professor of Medieval English and Director, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, University of Bristol) explores the multilingualism of England in the fifteenth century by examining the life and works of the first English printer, William Caxton. In standard histories of the English language, Caxton and the printing press appear as agents in the standardisation of English, but Caxton's language was in many ways unusual, and shows the impact…

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December 2019

“Ornament of the World” Film Screening

Wednesday, December 4, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Sponsored by the Center for Near Eastern Studies and co-sponsored by the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. (Please note the time change, now starting at 5:00 pm, not 6:00.) Please click here to register to attend. No fee. limited seating. The Ornament of the World tells a story from the past that’s especially timely today: the story of a remarkable time in history when Muslims, Christians and Jews forged a common cultural identity that frequently transcended their religious differences. Ornament will retrace…

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The Future of al-Andalus

Tuesday, December 3, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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This talk will be based on Professor Calderwood's current book project, which examines representations of al-Andalus (medieval Muslim Iberia) in contemporary literature, film, television, music, and tourism. Eric Calderwood is an Associate Professor in the Program in Comparative and World Literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Colonial al-Andalus: Spain and the Making of Modern Moroccan Culture (Harvard University Press, 2018). His articles have appeared in PMLA, The Journal of North African Studies, International Journal of Middle East Studies, and Journal…

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November 2019

Shakespeare Among the Boars: Translating Desire in Renaissance Literature

Wednesday, November 20, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Professor Ivan Lupić (English, Stanford University). “Had I been toothed like him ,” says Venus in Shakespeare’s 1593 narrative poem, “with kissing him I should have killed him first.” We learn from the rest of the poem that Adonis has been transformed into a flower and that Venus has gone to immure herself at Paphos, but we do not learn what happened to the boar. The loving boar’s fate had, however, been the subject of…

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The World in A Box: For a (Curious) History of Virtual Reality

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Italian Studies Distinguished Visiting Scholars Lecture This lecture by Professor Massimo Riva (Italian, Brown University) presents a pilot project of the Brown University Digital Publications Initiative, supported by the Mellon Foundation: a digital monograph focused on Italy as an imagined country, and illustrious or forgotten figures from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Italian art, history and culture. Six tales, or case histories, that are also episodes of a larger narrative which describes the role played by curious optical devices such as…

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CMRS Research Workshop

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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“Jesuit Pulpits with Wood Sculptures of Africa, America, Asia, and Europe Personifications” Maryanne Horowitz (Professor, History, Occidental College; CMRS Associate) Each CMRS Research Workshop is based on a pre-circulated research paper that the presenter—who may be a CMRS faculty member, associate, affiliate, or graduate student—wishes to discuss with colleagues. All attendees must read the paper under consideration and be prepared to contribute to the discussion. Click here to register to attend.

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Mediterranean Passages

Thursday, November 14, 2019 @ 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
French Seminar Room. Royce 236, Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States + Google Map

CMRS Pop-Up Faculty-Graduate Student Workshop This workshop understands the term “passage” in two ways: first, as the physical passage or journey that serves, as much as the shore, to define Mediterranean spaces and, second, as the specific literary passage that grounds our thinking about “the Mediterranean” as theoretical, or even disciplinary, space. We hope this workshop will be of particular interest to graduate students. Although the core faculty members (see below) focus on medieval and early modern literatures, contributions from…

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Love and Empire in Garcilaso de la Vega’s Latin Odes

Wednesday, November 6, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Professor Jay Reed (Classics and Comparative Literature, Brown University) The Spanish poet Garcilaso de la Vega’s three surviving Latin odes (from around 1532-36) have begun to be studied for the way they—like his much larger Spanish output—juxtapose and intertwine imperial and erotic themes. In both bodies of work there emerges a complex, ambivalent stance toward the project (which Garcilaso the courtier and soldier avowedly participated in) of the literary and political restoration of Rome in…

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Clapham’s “Narcissus” (1591) and the Isle of the Virgin Queen

Tuesday, November 5, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Jay Reed (Professor, Classics and Comparative Literature, Brown University) considers John Clapham's Latin poem Narcissus (published in London in 1591) which heavily embroiders Ovid's ancient version of the myth with such later European traditions as the allegory of love and the Virgin Queen. This poem of the English Renaissance, as a product of its time and place, demands to be read with and against the vernacular traditions that it subsumes into its highly classicizing Latin.

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California Medieval History Seminar, Fall 2019

Saturday, November 2, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classroom 3, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino, CA 91108 United States
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The Fall 2019 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. The papers under discussion are available for download in advance of the seminar. The papers…

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October 2019

CMRS Research Workshop

Tuesday, October 29, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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“Franks that are Acclimatized are Better: Anecdotal History and Everyday Life in Usāma ibn Munqidh’s Kitab al I‘tibar” Gina Lorenz (Graduate Student, French and Francophone Studies, UCLA) In his Kitab al I‘tibar, the warrior, gentleman, and poet Usāma ibn Munqidh (1095-1188) describes Franks as beasts, devils, and friends. He tells tales of epic battles and shared dinner tables, of conflict and mutual understanding. What is particularly compelling about Usāma’s text is that he focuses on the particular – on everyday…

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CMRS Graduate Student Reading Group

Thursday, October 24, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
French Seminar Room. Royce 236, Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States + Google Map
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Leonardo da Vinci, Inventing the Future: Flight, Automata, Art, Anatomy, Biomorphism

Friday, October 18, 2019 - Saturday, October 19, 2019
UCLA California NanoSystems Institute Conference Room, 570 Westwood Plaza, Building 114
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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A  conference presented by the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies,  UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center – David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, UCLA  ArtSci Center, and Caltech. This conference was proposed and brought to fruition primarily through the inspiration and efforts of Francis Wells. Organized by: Francis Wells (Cardiac Surgeon, Royal Papworth Hospital and Cambridge University, UK) Massimo Ciavolella (Professor of Italian and Comparative Literature, UCLA) Noel G. Boyle (Professor of Medicine/Cardiology, UCLA) Morteza Gharib (Professor of Aeronautics and Bioinspired Engineering, Caltech)…

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Authorship in Persian Painting

Wednesday, October 16, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
10383 Bunche Hall,

A Book Discussion with Lamia Balafrej (UCLA), Margaret S. Graves (Indiana University), Domenico Ingenito (UCLA), and Kishwar Rizvi (Yale University) Margaret Graves (Associate Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture, Indiana University), Domenico Ingenito (Assistant Professor of Classical Persian, UCLA), and Kishwar Rizvi (Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture, Yale University) will discuss The Making of the Artist in Late Timurid Painting (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), recently published by Lamia Balafrej (Assistant Professor of the Arts of the Islamic World, UCLA). This book…

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Metamorphosis and the Environmental Imagination from Ovid to Shakespeare

Friday, October 11, 2019 - Saturday, October 12, 2019
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Conference Narratives of metamorphosis, from human into other living and mineral forms, have long provided an important tool for thinking through the complexities of our relationship with the world around us. From Ovid to David Cronenberg, thinkers and artists have used the trope of physical transformation to figure the ways in which human and non-human agencies have evolved from and adapted to one another in a relationship characterized by fluctuating perceptions of friction and symbiosis, distance and proximity. This…

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CMRS Graduate Student Reading Group

Thursday, October 10, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
French Seminar Room. Royce 236, Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States + Google Map
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CMRS Open House

Thursday, October 10, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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You are invited to join CMRS Director Zrinka Stahuljak and the Center’s staff for the annual Open House celebrating the start of the new academic year. This is the Center’s 57th year of promoting interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies related to the years 600-1600 C.E. Please visit with and meet professors, students, colleagues, and friends who share scholarly interests. Find out more about the programs, fellowships, grants, and publications pertaining to Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA. No fee. Limited seating.…

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June 2019

Wars of Words: Conflict/ing Narratives, Myth, and Folklore, Day 2

Saturday, June 1, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This conference explores representations of conflict in popular narratives, myth and folklore, with emphasis on the reciprocal relationship between social antagonisms—individual, local, or international—and the stories that help process, shape, or perpetuate them. Drawing on a variety of literary sources including ancient epics, Anglo-Saxon poetry and medieval romance, Celtic mythology, and early modern drama, as well as premodern medical and natural-scientific materials, speakers explore folkloric materials that depict literal clashes between nations, groups, or individuals, as well as more abstract…

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May 2019

Wars of Words: Conflict/ing Narratives, Myth, and Folklore, Day 1

Friday, May 31, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 5:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This conference explores representations of conflict in popular narratives, myth and folklore, with emphasis on the reciprocal relationship between social antagonisms—individual, local, or international—and the stories that help process, shape, or perpetuate them. Drawing on a variety of literary sources including ancient epics, Anglo-Saxon poetry and medieval romance, Celtic mythology, and early modern drama, as well as premodern medical and natural-scientific materials, speakers explore folkloric materials that depict literal clashes between nations, groups, or individuals, as well as more abstract…

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Beastly Imagery in the Medieval World

Sunday, May 19, 2019
Dodd Hall 248,

CMRS/Getty Conference This symposium (held in conjunction with the exhibition Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World at the J. Paul Getty Museum May 14-August 18, 2019) highlights new research on animals in medieval visual culture. The focus of the exhibition is the bestiary, perhaps the most important source of information about animals in the period. The animal stories and images contained within the bestiary served as inspiration for public sermons, daily reading for the religious, and entertainment…

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Armenian Liturgical Chant: Historic Elements for the Future

Wednesday, May 15, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture The perpetuation of Armenian liturgical chant was ensured over the centuries by a subtle relationship between the written and the oral transmission. The vulnerability of both brings up essential questions: what were the characteristics of the notation systems and of the oral transmission system which kept this singing tradition alive? How did this work especially among the cantor groups in cities and towns? Being at the same time an "insider" and a researcher on this…

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Looking Slowly at Early Modern Maps

Tuesday, May 14, 2019 @ 5:15 pm - 6:45 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Co-sponsored Workshop About a decade ago Malcolm Gladwell in his 2005 book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking lauded the ability of art connoisseurs and other experts to make rapid judgments based on a small amount of information. While interesting and well-suited to our short-attention-span culture, the book leaves by the wayside the essential insights about works of art and other objects that can only be achieved through patient contemplation. The practice of “slow art” originated in the eighteenth century, and…

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Landscapes of St. Gregory: Topography and Sanctity in Medieval Italy

Monday, May 6, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Alison Locke Perchuk gives a work-in-progress presentation of an interdisciplinary study of the art, architecture, and landscapes of Benedictine monasteries in central Italy, VI–XII c., including Montecassino, Sacro Speco at Subiaco, and Sant’Eutizio at Norcia, largely destroyed by earthquakes in 2016–17. The project’s methodological contribution is to bring ecocriticism into dialogue with art history, positioning landscape as protagonist in the construction of sanctity in the medieval Latin West and examining the ways in which monastic art and architecture established, communicated,…

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California Medieval History Seminar, Spring 2019

Saturday, May 4, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classrooms 1 & 2, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino , CA 91108 United States
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The Spring 2019 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. The papers under discussion will be announced. Advance registration is required. Participants must be graduate…

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My Aretino and Titian’s Aretino

Wednesday, May 1, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Lecture A talk by Raymond Waddington, emeritus professor at UC Davis:  How an English professor can become an Aretino authority.  Why Titian and Aretino are inseparable.  And why contexts are essential. Professor Waddington has published five books, over seventy articles, and co-edited three books.  Aretino's Satyr (2004) received the MLA's Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies, and was  translated into Italian (2009).  It was followed by Pietro Aretino: Subverting the System in Renaissance Italy (2013), and Titian's Aretino (2018).  He…

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April 2019

Conflicts of Interest: Historiography, Hagiography, and Romance in Medieval England

Saturday, April 27, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Organized by Professors Matthew Fisher (English, UCLA) and Arvind Thomas (English, UCLA), this two-day symposium features scholars working on the often fractious conflicts of the medieval past. Medievalists will consider both historic and also generic conflicts of interest in medieval England and on the Continent. The symposium will bring together a diverse community of scholars from around the world, and also include the work of graduate and undergraduate scholars. Collectively, we will explore how medieval conflicts of interest might be…

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Tras las pista de la literatura perdida: fragmentos de obras medievales en archivos de la Inquisición

Friday, April 26, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Lydeen Library, Rolfe Hall Room 4302,

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture (presented in Spanish) Gemma Avenoza, Universitat de Barcelona Investigar sobre el libro antiguo es estar a la espera de encontrar una sorpresa. La profesora Gemma Avenoza, especialista en codicología y libro antiguo, nos acerca al mundo de la literatura perdida y hallada dentro de las tapas y refuerzos de encuadernaciones antiguas. Versiones desconocidas, fragmentos de ediciones perdidas, y todo un mundo literario medieval se rescatan en bibliotecas y archivos al rededor del mundo. Avenoza presenta un caso…

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Conflicts of Interest: Historiography, Hagiography, and Romance in Medieval England

Friday, April 26, 2019 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Organized by Professors Matthew Fisher (English, UCLA) and Arvind Thomas (English, UCLA), this two-day symposium features scholars working on the often fractious conflicts of the medieval past. Medievalists will consider both historic and also generic conflicts of interest in medieval England and on the Continent. The symposium will bring together a diverse community of scholars from around the world, and also include the work of graduate and undergraduate scholars. Collectively, we will explore how medieval conflicts of interest might be…

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Golden Girls: Objectification and Transcendence in Old English Poetry

Monday, April 22, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable In this Roundtable, Sara Burdorff (UCLA) reexamines the place of women in the Anglo-Saxon heroic system, as represented in Old English poetry.  Drawing on evidence from Beowulf as well as “The Wife’s Lament,” the “Dream of the Rood,” and other lyric poems, Burdorff explores the poetic equation of women and gold as evidence, not of their subordination, but of their transcendent indispensability to masculine heroic society. She suggests that this ‘golden girl’ motif identifies women as semiotic equivalent…

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How to See Water in an Age of Unusual Droughts: Ecological Aesthetics in the Little Ice Age, India

Thursday, April 18, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Dodd Hall 275, Los Angeles, United States + Google Map

CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture The Little Ice Age (ca. 1550–1850), a climatic period marked by glacial expansion in Europe, brought droughts of unprecedented intensity to South Asia. In drought-ravaged north India, the beginnings of the Little Ice Age not only corresponded with the emergence of new techniques of landscape painting and riparian architecture that emphasized the materiality of flowing water but also saw the enunciation of a new theology of Krishna worship that centralized the veneration of the natural environment. Tracing…

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Visions of Medieval Studies in North America: A Conference in Honor of Patrick J. Geary

Saturday, April 13, 2019 - Sunday, April 14, 2019
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Borrowing its title from Patrick Geary’s article “Visions of Medieval Studies in North America” published in the 1994 volume The Past and Future of Medieval Studies, this conference honors the distinguished career of Patrick J. Geary, Andrew W. Mellon Professor of History at the Institute for Advanced Study (2012–2019), Distinguished Professor of History at UCLA (1993–2011), Professor of History at the University of Florida (1980–1993), and Director of the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies (1993–1998). Celebrating both the…

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Fathers and Daughters in Literature from the Genesis to Romanticism (a work in progress)

Monday, April 8, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable Professor Marianna Birnbaum (Germanic, UCLA) discusses her current work on Biblical topics as they appear in literature, connecting Biblical stories about fathers and daughters with plots in literature from the Renaissance to Romanticism. Her discussion includes, among others, Dinah and Jacob, Esther and Mordechai, and Lot and his daughters, with an analysis of the roles these fathers and surrogate fathers play, showing how the Biblical messages operate in belles lettres. Please click this link to register and let us know…

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Women as Writers of Heroic Poetry in Renaissance Italy: An Epic Micro-Tradition?

Friday, April 5, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This symposium explores all facets of heroic poetry as written by Italian Renaissance women and aims to spotlight their heroic poems and place them in a tradition that has for the most part ignored their work. We are also interested in the ways these women authors handle specific conventions of the genre such as the difference between the romance and epic modes, the engagement with literary predecessors, and the representation of traditional female characters like the woman-warrior or the enchantress.…

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Phenomenomology and Artistic Creation: Emmanuel Levinas as Critic: A Chaucerian Test Case

Thursday, April 4, 2019 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Bringing Emmanuel Levinas to bear on Chaucer’s Pardoner’s Tale, has the virtue of recovering what is authentically other. Because Levinas refuses to leap to conclusions about values, about human nature, even about God’s nature, his phenomenological speculations regard the reality of existence as ethical encounter in the world itself—ontological questions are, for him, already ethical ones—Levinas is a textual and cultural critic of enormous value. Works of art are, for him, mediators between the consciousness of an author and that…

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March 2019

Syllogisms in Stone: Theophilus, Stephen, Abelard on the Walls of Notre-Dame de Paris

Tuesday, March 12, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Gothic cathedrals were great engines of urban renewal in the High Middle Ages. The great religious works projects contributed to the revival of trades and to the new institutions of medieval towns. Not the least of these was the University of Paris, which grew out of the cathedral school of Notre-Dame in the second half of the twelfth century. Using three sculptural programs on the outer walls of Notre-Dame alongside the example of Abelard, we…

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The Manuscripts of Reginald Pecock

Monday, March 11, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable Bishop Reginald Pecock (d. ca. 1459) actively wrote for over thirty years of his life, from his mid-thirties when he left university until his mid-sixties when he was confined at Thorney Abbey and deprived of his writing instruments in the aftermath of his conviction of heresy. From this period, we have only five books remaining. This roundtable, however, is not about what survives. Rather, it is about the more than forty books that we know he had written—Pecock…

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Thought Crimes: Subversive Politics in Art Made For Medieval Jews

Thursday, March 7, 2019 @ 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E Young Dr East
Los Angeles, 90095 United States
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CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture At the Maurice Amado Lecture in Sephardic Studies, Marc Michael Epstein (Vassar College)will explore issues of temporality (the way in which the passing of time is indicated or implied) in illuminated manuscripts made for Jews in the fourteenth century. What happens when, viewing images as a frozen snapshots in time, we consider the potentially politically subversive implications of the implied action that will ensue in the moment after the one that is frozen in the frame? What…

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Captivated by the Mediterranean: Early Modern Spain and the Political Economy of Ransom

Tuesday, March 5, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Co-sponsored Lecture In The Captive Sea, Daniel Hershenzon (University of Connecticut) explores the entangled histories of Muslim and Christian captives—and, by extension, of the Spanish Empire, Ottoman Algiers, and Morocco—in the seventeenth century to argue that piracy, captivity, and redemption helped shape the Mediterranean as an integrated region at the social, political, and economic levels. Despite their confessional differences, the lives of captives and captors alike were connected in a political economy of ransom and communication networks shaped by…

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Merchants, Artisans & Literati: The Book Market in Renaissance Europe

Friday, March 1, 2019 - Saturday, March 2, 2019
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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A Conference Organized by Angela Nuovo (University of Milan – EmoBookTrade Project) In the early stage of printing, Erasmus from Rotterdam provided a vivid account of his experience with the renowned humanist and publisher Aldus Manutius. In his 1508 Adagia, Erasmus described himself torn between Aldus’s rich library and his frantic printing shop where, allegedly, Erasmus was pressured by the publisher and his craftsmen to release the last-minute drafts of his texts moments before having them sent to press. Whether fictitious…

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February 2019

Sixteen Tomes: The Lost Worlds of Leone de’ Sommi — Dramatic Readings with Commentary

Wednesday, February 27, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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On the night of January 25th and 26th, 1904, a fire ravaged the National University Library of Turin, Italy, destroying 30,000 books and half its 4200 manuscripts. Among the latter were sixteen unique volumes containing the complete writings of Leone de' Sommi (c. 1525-c. 1590), the Jewish-Italian scholar, playwright, director, and actor from Mantua. Only a handful of Leone's works survived the conflagration. In anticipation of the carnivalesque Jewish festival of Purim, this program aims to reconstruct (to the extent…

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The Greek Village

Friday, February 22, 2019 - Saturday, February 23, 2019
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Conference The Greek chorio has been a frequent subject of interest to anthropologists, who have written extensively about rituals, kinship structures, work, and gender. Increasingly, the subject has come under the scrutiny of archaeologists, who have carefully traced the material remains of villages and households in order to reconstruct the lives of those who lived outside of better studied cities and towns. This symposium aims to examine the Greek village diachronically and across disciplines — through its most ancient…

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17th Annual Student Colloquium in Armenian Studies

Thursday, February 14, 2019 - Friday, February 15, 2019
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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The Annual Colloquia in Armenian Studies are a forum for graduate and undergraduate students from various disciplines whose research bears on Armenian Studies to present scholarly papers in the humanities and social sciences, within disciplines as wide-ranging as Anthropology, Archaeology, Art history, Comparative Literature, Gender Studies, History, and Political Science. Please go to https://nelc.ucla.edu/conference/agsc/ for the complete schedule and further details. Sponsored by the UCLA Department for Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. Co-sponsored by the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies.

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Pontormo: Painting in an Age of Anxiety

Sunday, February 10, 2019 - Monday, February 11, 2019
To Be Announced,

Pontormo: Miraculous Encounters, on view at the Getty Museum from February 5 to April 28, 2019, brings together a small number of exceptional works by Jacopo da Pontormo, one of the greatest Italian artists of the sixteenth century. The exhibition features one of his most moving and innovative altarpieces, The Visitation, an unprecedented loan from the parish Church of Santi Michele e Francesco in Carmignano (Prato, Italy), alongside the Getty’s own, iconic Portrait of a Halberdier, and the recently rediscovered…

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California Medieval History Seminar, Winter 2019

Saturday, February 9, 2019 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classrooms 1 & 2, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino , CA 91108 United States
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The Winter 2019 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. These are the papers under discussion at this seminar: Richard Rush (UCR), “Claudianus Mamertus and the…

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Art and Cultural Resistance between Islam and Christianity

Thursday, February 7, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Annual Armand Hammer Art History Lecture The eastern frontier between Islam and Christianity in the thirteenth century was extremely porous: artists, merchants and pilgrims carried ideas and goods across it with ease. The results of this movement are visible in the churches and mosques, monasteries and madrasas that survive in modern territories of Armenia, Georgia and eastern Turkey. These buildings are often all but indistinguishable in their construction and decoration, suggesting a picture of deeply interwoven populations. This lecture explores…

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Imagining Borderless Art Histories: Vagabond Tactics and the Public Good

Monday, February 4, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable To address the challenges of devising adequate world/global/planetary frameworks for studying art in a radically expanded field of objects and practices, in the current political situation with its accelerating climate crises, Professor Claire Farago (University of Colorado, Boulder; CMRS Associate) examines the usefulness of new borderless organizational concepts such as porosity, family resemblance, scale, topography, and topology. Focusing on links between now and the so-called medieval and early modern era (ca. 800-1800), it engages with critical efforts to rethink…

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January 2019

‘Heavenly Hermaphrodites’: Adam, Eve, and the Creation of Sex

Wednesday, January 30, 2019 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture This lecture by Leah DeVun, (History, Rutgers University) examines how certain ancient and medieval thinkers claimed that “hermaphroditism” was the original condition of humanity, created by God and documented in the first chapters of Genesis. The idea that Adam was a hermaphrodite fueled medieval debates about sex and gender, as well as about human nature. In the modern world, objections to transgender and gender-nonconforming people often cite the Bible, which is viewed as describing the…

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English Bibles and their Paratexts, 1525-1611

Monday, January 28, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The King James version, as we all know, has no illustrations, no glosses, no indices, no chronologies, and, basically, no nuttin except for a rather long and dull preface by Miles Smith, the soon-to-be Bishop of Gloucester. Earlier English bibles are much more interesting. They have multi-page charts that look like amusement park rides; woodcuts of the Annunciation with a star-faced Moses perched on the windowsill of Mary’s bedroom; patristic encomia on church music, celebrating its power to build community…

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UCLA English Medieval Reading Group

Friday, January 25, 2019 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Kaplan 193, 415 Portola Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Open to UCLA students and faculty. Please contact Professor Fisher fisher@humnet.ucla.edu for  further details.

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In/Attention: Classroom Distraction and Early English Drama

Wednesday, January 23, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable Standard histories of drama understand the emergence of liturgical performance—as recorded in Æthelwold of Winchester’s late tenth-century monastic customary, the Regularis Concordia—in isolation. In this talk, Erica Weaver (English, UCLA) situates it alongside contemporaneous school texts to establish that it is actually part of a wider performative mode that promoted heightened concentration as the ultimate goal of monastic life. Please register below. No fee. Limited seating. Self-pay parking in lots 2, 3, and 4. Parking information at main.transportation.ucla.edu/campus-parking/visitors.…

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“This is What I Have on My Bookshelf”: Jewish Autobiography and Descriptive Bibliography in the Islamic West

Monday, January 14, 2019 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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The 28th Richard and Mary Rouse History of the Book Lecture This year's History of the Book Lecture by Professor S.J. Pearce (NYU, Art & Science) explores the relationship between descriptive bibliography — writing in a detailed way about the contents of a library — and autobiography in the writing lives of medieval Jews and converts from Judaism in the Islamic west, that is, Spain and North Africa. Professor Pearce looks at autobiographical writings in which detailed library catalogues are…

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December 2018

Artistic Expressions of Political Hierarchies in Aragon–Catalonia at the Turn of the Thirteenth Century: Painting, Poetry, Power

Monday, December 3, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable Please note: this Roundtable has been rescheduled from the originally scheduled date of October 29, 2018. In this talk, CMRS Affiliate Dr. Shannon Wearing explores the artistic and literary patronage of Alfonso II, King of Aragon and Count of Barcelona (r. 1162–96), with particular emphasis on the Liber Feudorum Maior, a cartulary documenting the king’s territorial holdings and the hierarchical power relationships between the lords of Catalonia. The Liber is one of very few examples of its genre…

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November 2018

Why Equine History Matters

Friday, November 30, 2018 - Sunday, December 2, 2018
University Library Building California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, Pomona, CA + Google Map

The Equine History Conference, 2018 Richard Nash, Indiana University – Bloomington Plenary Session, Friday 8:30am W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library, Tour of Special Collections Saturday 2pm W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Center, Sunday Show Sunday 2pm To register visit: https://equinehistory.wordpress.com/conference/ University Library Building California State Polytechnic University, Pomona Pomona, CA Sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Library / Cal Poly Pomona University Library, with additional funding from the UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Organized by the Equine History…

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Thomas Becket and Henry II : Friends who Became Enemies?

Monday, November 19, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable Leena Löfstedt (University of Helsinki and CMRS Associate) relates how the Becket controversy and murder in the cathedral coincide with the introduction in England of Gratian’s newly compiled Decretum. Her paper examines the complex relationship of King Henry II and Archbishop Thomas Becket using twelfth-century Gratian-related material: an Old French translation of the Decretum, a Latin Decretum-manuscript from 1170-1180 including marginalia, French and Latin texts of Thomas Becket’s letters sent in 1166. Unafraid of each other, the former…

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Where the Only Light is the One You Create: A Modern Adaptation of Dante’s ‘Inferno’

Friday, November 16, 2018 - Saturday, November 17, 2018
UCLA Northwest Campus Auditorium, 350 De Neve Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90024
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Where the Only Light is the One You Create: A Modern Adaptation of Dante’s Inferno is a theatrical production scheduled for two performances at UCLA: Friday, November 16th at 6:30 PM Saturday, November 17th at 2 PM Both performances are at the Northwest Campus Auditorium near Carnesale Commons and Sproul Hall. Sponsored by: The UCLA Humanities Division; UCLA Franklin D. Murphy Chair; UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies; UCLA Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion; UCLA Department of Italian;…

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Hidden Treasures Unearthed: Armenian Arts and Culture of Eastern Europe

Friday, November 16, 2018 - Sunday, November 18, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS is pleased to be a co-sponsor of this conference organized by Professor Peter Cowe in the UCLA Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures. Complete conference details and schedules are found on their website. This conference seeks to contribute to a longue durée approach to Near Eastern engagement with Europe with an emphasis on the early modern period (16th-18thcc.), which marked the heyday of Armenian communities as a crucial component of international trade hubs in eastern Europe, involving an…

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New documentary evidence for the trade in papers

Tuesday, November 13, 2018 @ 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
10383 Bunche Hall,

A lecture by Anne Regourd (Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris) Watermarked papers, which served as media for Islamic manuscripts (codices and documents), were imported from Europe at least since the 13th century. The study of trade in papers brings us, therefore, to Global history. My approach is to treat the papers found in Islamic manuscripts as primary sources, which can be connected to narrative sources and archives, in order to map the routes that papers took as a…

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Understanding Medical Humanities

Friday, November 2, 2018 - Saturday, November 3, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Ahmanson Conference Medical Humanities is a relatively new and increasingly popular field of knowledge that is yet to be clearly defined. Broadly, it may be conceptualized as a discipline wherein medicine and its specialties intersect, at a given historical time, with the humanities. As such it is a dynamic area of endeavor where the impact of disease and healing science on culture is assessed and expressed in the arts and in the specific language of the various disciplines concerned…

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October 2018

Dante’s “Inferno” in the American Cinema Before and After World War II

Tuesday, October 30, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture In this presentation, Mirko Tavoni screens and comments on selected clips from three films produced in the United States between 1924-1944, and two films produced in the late 1990s. These films actualize Dante's Inferno within five – very different – contemporary stories. In the three pre-war films – i.e. Dante's Inferno by Henry Otto (1924), the homonymous Dante's Inferno by Harry Lachman (1935), and the Harlemwood production Go Down Death! by Spencer Williams (1944) –…

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California Medieval History Seminar, Fall 2018

Saturday, October 27, 2018 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classrooms 1 & 2, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino , CA 91108 United States
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The Fall 2018 session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. These are the papers under discussion at this seminar: Anthony Perron (Loyola Marymount University), “Outlaw Corpses,…

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Marco Polo, Immigrant Historian of Mongol China

Thursday, October 25, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture Professor Margaret Kim (Department of Foreign Languages,National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan) examines Marco Polo’s treatment of the other within the framework of historical immigration to China under Mongol rule. Marco Polo left Europe as a teenager and lived in Asia for more than two decades. He spent a great part of the most formative years of his life, certainly the peak of his youth and most of his middle age, in China. While medievalists…

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In the Name of the Father: Translation and Anxiety in Medieval Castile, 1252–1369

Tuesday, October 16, 2018 @ 9:30 am - 10:30 am
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture A talk by Ryan Szpiech, Associate Professor in the Departments of Romance Languages and Literatures and Judaic Studies and an affiliate of the Department of Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan. Professor Szpiech studies the cultures and literatures of medieval Iberia, focusing especially on cultural interaction, exchange, and conflict. His interests converge around polemical writing (religious disputations and conflicts) and translation (of languages, alphabets, styles, beliefs, identities, and ideas) as elements defining the relations…

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Iberia, the Mediterranean, and the World in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

Thursday, October 11, 2018 - Saturday, October 13, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This conference focuses on different historical themes (culture, religiosity, languages, politics, encounters) and addresses the “connectivity” between Iberia, North Africa and other Mediterranean lands as well as the nature of the global Mediterranean. Organized by Thomas Barton (USD), Marie Kelleher (CSULB), Zrinka Stahuljak (UCLA), and Antonio Zaldivar (CSUSM) Please click here for the schedule, registration, and additional details.

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Reading for Echoes: Machiavelli, Guicciardini, and Exemplarity in the Brief Discourse of c. 1587

Thursday, October 4, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Young Research Library Special Collections, 280 Charles E Young Dr N
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Ahmanson Research Fellow Project Talk Nicholas Fenech’s project is an immersion in the textual dimensions of historical knowledge, taking as its case-study a single Elizabethan treatise on foreign policy, ascribed to both Lord Burghley and Francis Bacon, existing in multiple variants with extensive but unrecognized debts to Florentine political theory and historiography. The implications of this study should be felt as much by scholars of Guicciardini and Machiavelli as by historians of Burghley and humanist politics. If the project is…

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CMRS Annual Open House

Wednesday, October 3, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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You are invited to join CMRS Director Massimo Ciavolella and the Center’s staff for the annual Open House celebrating the start of the new academic year. This is the Center's 56th year of promoting interdisciplinary and cross-cultural studies related to the years 600-1600 C.E. You are invited to come and meet professors, students, colleagues, and friends who share scholarly interests. Find out more about the programs, fellowships, grants, and publications pertaining to Medieval and Renaissance Studies at UCLA. Please register…

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September 2018

La Escena: LA’s First Hispanic Classical Theater Festival

Friday, September 21, 2018 - Sunday, September 23, 2018
Greenway Court Theater, 544 North Fairfax Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90036 United States
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September 21-23, 2018, brings LA ESCENA, Los Angeles’ first Hispanic classical theater festival, to the Greenway Court Theater (544 N. Fairfax). Schedule details and tickets are at http://diversifyingtheclassics.humanities.ucla.edu/la-escena/ Cutting-edge Mexican company EFE Tres will present Lope de Vega’s El príncipe inocente (The Innocent Prince), a meditation on political power and culpability reimagined as a dialogue in a prison cell, and El Merolico (The Mountebank), a reworking of Cervantes’ comic interludes as delivered by a traveling performer in small-town Mexico (in Spanish, with English subtitles).…

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August 2018

Defining Medieval Stupefaction

Friday, August 10, 2018 @ 4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
Young Research Library Special Collections, 280 Charles E Young Dr N
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Please join us for a guest lecture titled "Defining Medieval Stupefaction" from Ahmanson Research Fellow, Laura Godfrey, Ph.D candidate in Medieval Studies at the University of Connecticut. Her dissertation, "Be wholly out of body: Astonishment in Late English Literature," examines the limits of embodiment during moments of somatic overwhelm that lead to insight and understanding. Her work at UCLA Library Special Collections focuses primarily on late medieval medical understanding of sensory and cognitive loss. Laura will discuss her research, which…

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July 2018

“Sorceress” (1987) – CMRS Movie Night

Wednesday, July 11, 2018 @ 6:00 pm - 7:45 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Set in an isolated medieval village in France, Sorceress (Le Moine et la Sorcière) is based on the writings of Etienne de Bourbon, a thirteenth-century Dominican friar who is sent by the Pope to seek out heresy. Etienne discovers that, when their children are sick, the village women go to a forest woman, Elda, to help them heal their babies. Elda is schooled in the ancient arts of healing, the use of leaves, seeds, and bark, and, if need be,…

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June 2018

First Do No Harm: On the Interplay of Folklore, Myth, and Medicine from the Ancient World to the Renaissance and Beyond

Friday, June 1, 2018 - Saturday, June 2, 2018
De Neve Plaza B, 351 Charles E Young Drive West Plaza Room B
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Medical Humanities Conference - This conference, organized by CMRS Affiliate Dr. Sara Burdorff (Lecturer, English, UCLA), Professor Stephanie Jamison (Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA) and Professor Olga Yokoyama (Applied Linguistics, UCLA), examines the intersections between mythology, folklore, and medicine in literature from the classical through early modern periods. Inspired by the UCLA Freshman Mythology Cluster course (GE30) and drawing on sources including hagiography and Celtic folklore, medieval romance and early modern drama, this conference engages the critical interplay between…

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May 2018

Happiness, Learning, and Leadership in Marvell’s ‘An Horatian Ode Upon Cromwell’s Return from Ireland’ and Milton’s ‘Of Education’

Monday, May 14, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable The critical opinion of Andrew Marvell’s “An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell’s Return from Ireland” has largely been that the lyric’s imagination of nationhood is ambiguous, unlike that in Milton’s Of Education. Of Education argues for a new style of education for national leaders that would improve on a “defect” of Sparta’s: Milton’s would be “equally good for both peace and war.” Using computational text analysis methods, Dr. Valerie Shepard (UCLA Graduate Student Resource Center and CMRS Associate) compares…

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Cities, Ships, and Saints: Religious Practice and Maritime Networks in the Western Indian Ocean (11th-16th centuries)

Wednesday, May 9, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture As portrayed in a sixteenth-century bio-chronicle of the port city of Aden in Yemen, men of renowned piety performed miracles that delivered their devotees from pirates and tempests, ensured success in the marketplace, and calibrated the sometimes treacherously plural urban milieu. Can these miracles or their retelling be said to characterize a city-based identity, a distinctive maritime culture, and a networked transoceanic world in the context of the “pre-modern” Indian Ocean? The sea is a…

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Past to Page: A Panel Discussion with Comic Book Artists and Creators

Monday, May 7, 2018 @ 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Medieval and Renaissance themes continue to have a profound influence on contemporary comic books and graphic novels. Join Dr. Kristina Markman (History, UCLA) for a panel discussion featuring comic creators Conor McCreery (Kill Shakespeare, IDW Publishers), GMB Chomichuk (Midnight City, Infinitum, Rust and Water, Raygun Gothic) and industry veteran Howard Chaykin (The Divided States of Hysteria, Image, Marvel, and DC Comics). Advance registration is required. Please click here to complete the short registration form. No fee. Limited seating. Self-pay parking in…

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Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature

Friday, May 4, 2018 - Saturday, May 5, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Medical Humanities Conference Humanity has always approached disease with a mixture of curiosity and dread. Medieval and early modern people were no exception, displaying a deep fascination with virulent ailments and all sorts of physical deformities. But despite this attraction, few artists of these eras engaged in the depiction of disease. When they did, their expression was particular to the medium used and differed among artists even when using the same medium. Since such an effort was outside their…

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Literary Networks of the Vicars Choral and the Clerical Proletariat in Late Medieval English Cathedrals: Lyrics of Complaint from York, Norwich, and St. Paul’s

Thursday, May 3, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture When Margery Kempe visited York Minster in 1417 she was befriended by two of the choral vicarii, John Kendale “and another preste whech song be the bischopys grave.” The grave in question belonged to Archbishop Richard Scrope, who was executed under Henry IV and whose semi-suppressed cult remained a matter of some delicacy. Kendale and his unnamed fellow were not only counseling Kempe, but introducing her to the Minster’s history, saints, and monuments—an official part…

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April 2018

California Medieval History Seminar, Spring 2018

Saturday, April 28, 2018 @ 9:30 am - 4:00 pm
Huntington Library, Seaver Classrooms 1 & 2, 1151 Oxford Rd
San Marino , CA 91108 United States
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The Spring Session of the California Medieval History Seminar meets at the Huntington Library to discuss four pre-distributed research papers. Participants are scholars in the field at various stages of their careers. All attendees at the seminar are expected to read the papers in advance and discuss the research. Speakers and paper topics are announced by e-mail. Click here for additional information about the seminar. The papers under discussion at this seminar are: Allison Perchuk (CSU Channel Islands) “Landscapes of St…

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CMRS Movie: “Ran”

Thursday, April 26, 2018 @ 5:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Akira Kurosawa's brilliantly conceived re-telling of Shakespeare's King Lear magically mixes Japanese history, Shakespeare's plot and Kurosawa's own feelings about loyalty in the masterpiece, “Ran”. Set in 16th-century Japan, Lord Hidetora, announces his intention to divide his land equally among his three sons. This decision to step down unleashes a power struggle between the three heirs. (Running time: 2 hours, 42 minutes) Advance registration is requested. Please click here to complete the short registration form. No fee. Limited seating. Self-pay parking…

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Of Books and Roses — De Libres I Roses

Monday, April 23, 2018 - Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Second California Symposium on Catalan Studies Monday April 23,  Royce Hall 306 8:30 AM Breakfast 9:00 Welcoming Remarks: John Dagenais and Gemma Repiso 9:15 Linguistic Variation and Language in Contact | Moderator: Ji Young Kim Dues llengües, dues pronunciacions? Un projecte de corpus per a la fonologia bilingüe del castellà i català Monja Burkard (University of Vienna) El català i el castellà: comparació de les actituds lingüístiques a Palma i Barcelona Anna Tudela (Beijing Foreign Studies University) Flexibilitat sintàctica del…

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Secrecy, Scheming, and Samuel Pepys’s Diary

Thursday, April 19, 2018 @ 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
UCLA Faculty Center, 480 Charles E Young Dr East
Los Angeles, 90095 United States
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Annual William & Lois Matthews Samuel Pepys Lecture Samuel Pepys began his diary of the 1660s in shorthand, a measure designed to protect its contents from prying eyes in dangerous times. This proved a wise move, for, as a rising man in Restoration London, his journal was to be full of his private schemes, good and bad. The ‘bad’ make for impressive reading; they include adulterous designs, corrupt dealings, and Machiavellian ploys designed to advance him in Charles II’s government.…

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‘Yet have I in me something dangerous’: On the Interplay of Medicine and Maleficence in Shakespeare’s ‘Hamlet’

Monday, April 16, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable / Medical Humanities From poisoning to epilepsy, demonic possession to venereal disease, Shakespeare’s Hamlet touches on a wide range of bodily maladies, played out in the person of the Danish prince and echoed in the voices of those around him, including the ghost, the gravedigger, and Ophelia. Building on the fascination with demonology most often identified in King Lear, CMRS Associate Dr. Sara Frances Burdorff (English, UCLA) explores some of the ways in which Hamlet, too, is a…

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“Enrique Octavo” / “Henry VIII” (Calderón, 1627): La comedia y la corona / A Spanish Play of Power

Saturday, April 7, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Symposium The Bilingual Foundation of the Arts is staging one of Calderón’s most profound tragedies in Los Angeles April 13-22. This tragedy dramatizes the psychological downfall of Henry VIII (Enrique Octavo) whose sensual passion makes him vulnerable to the shrewd manipulation of his ambitious minister Wolsey (Volseo) and the seductive and no less ambitious Anne Boleyn (Ana Bolena). Both induce the monarch to break up his marriage with Catherine of Aragon—daughter of the “Reyes Católicos” Isabelle and Ferdinand of…

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March 2018

The 40th Annual UC Celtic Studies Conference & Annual CSANA Meeting

Thursday, March 8, 2018 - Sunday, March 11, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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This joint meeting of the Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) and the 40th Annual UC Celtic Studies Conference features papers on all aspects of Celtic culture including language, literature, history, art, and archaeology, from late antiquity to the present day. The program is organized by Professor Joseph F. Nagy (Professor Emeritus, UCLA; Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University), Dr. Karen E. Burgess (UCLA-CMRS), and the Celtic Colloquium student group. Funded by the Campus Programs Committee of the Program…

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Thinking About the 11th-Century Mediterranean Economy

Wednesday, March 7, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Moore Hall room 100, Los Angeles, California 90095 + Google Map

CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture   Please note the location of this lecture has changed from Royce Hall Room 306. The new location is Moore Hall Room 100. When discussing the Mediterranean economy many people focus on international shipping; but most economic activity—even today, never mind a millennium ago—is regional, and, above all, highly local. In this talk, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Chris Wickham (Emeritus Chichele Professor of Medieval History, University of Oxford; Fellow, All Soul’s College) explores the local…

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The Virgin at Daphni

Monday, March 5, 2018 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Lecture The eleventh-century church of the Dormition (Koimesis) of the Virgin at Daphni on the outskirts of Athens is one of the most famous Byzantine monuments known, appearing even in general histories of art. Yet very little has been published on its mosaics in the past 60 years, and the program of decoration has never been evaluated. In this talk, CMRS Distinguished Visiting Scholar Leslie Brubaker (Professor of Byzantine Art History, University of Birmingham) analyzes the…

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E. A. Moody Medieval Philosophy Workshop

Saturday, March 3, 2018 - Sunday, March 4, 2018
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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Organized by Professor Calvin Normore (Philosophy, UCLA), the topic of this year’s workshop will be announced — further details when available. No fee. Limited seating. Self-pay parking in lots 2, 3, and 4. Parking information at https://main.transportation.ucla.edu/campus-parking/visitors

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February 2018

Duke John’s Skull: From History Lesson to Crime Exhibit

Monday, February 26, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Roundtable In the aftermath of the assassination of Duke John of Burgundy (1419), a pivotal event in the Hundred Years’ War, the duke’s shattered skull became a famous bone of contention in disputes about the past. The controversial skull was kept by Carthusian monks and shown as a curiosity to visiting royalty until the Revolution. Modernity turned this unholy relic and macabre symbol of national disaster into a scientific specimen. It was repeatedly exhumed and studied, sketched and photographed,…

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Unveiling Judeo-Spanish Texts: A Hebrew Aljamiado Workshop

Thursday, February 22, 2018 @ 1:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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The Hebrew Aljamiado Research Group of the Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies are offering a workshop in learning to read 14th-16th century Judeo-Spanish texts written using the Hebrew alphabet: Hebrew “aljamiado” writing.  Attendees will also learn about the cultural context of Hebrew aljamiado writing in the Peninsula and in the Sephardic diaspora. Professor Michelle Hamilton of Spanish & Portuguese Studies at the University of Minnesota, a leading scholar of these texts, will…

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Michelangelo and the Life and Death of Adam and Eve

Tuesday, February 20, 2018 @ 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Royce Hall Room 306, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles, CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Lecture In this talk, Herbert Morris (Professor of Philosophy and Professor of Law Emeritus, UCLA) analyzes Michelangelo’s treatment of Adam and Eve in three panels of the Sistine Ceiling devoted to their creation, temptation, and expulsion. Delving into topics that have been minimally attended to in the critical literature or not at all, this talk examines aspects of the paintings in which Michelangelo departs from the text of Genesis, such as the nakedness of Adam and Eve in the…

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The Red Dragon Logbook Conference

Friday, February 16, 2018 @ 9:00 am - 2:00 pm
6275 Bunche Hall, 90095 + Google Map

A one-day symposium follows the 1586 voyage of the ship Red Dragon. The ship’s little-known logbook, documenting its journey from England, to Sierra Leone, Rio de la Plata and Salvador da Bahia, illuminates the early interconnected histories of Europe, Africa, and Latin America. Speakers: Vanessa Wilkie, Huntington Library Eleanor Hubbard, Princeton University David Wheat, Michigan State University Kara Schultz, Vanderbilt University Gabriel Rocha, Drexel University Karen Ordahl Kupperman, New York University This conference is made possible by the generosity of…

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Objects of Conversion in Early Modern Europe

Thursday, February 15, 2018 - Saturday, February 17, 2018
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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CMRS Early Modern Conversions Conference Can objects convert? Exploring the relationship between objects and conversion can usefully complicate the usual distinctions between subjects and objects. From sacramental materials to holy wells, human hands to books, new kinds of food and drink to precious metals and forms of currency, objects can both convert and be converted, tangling any linear chain of causality. Objects are also purposes, inviting us to ask not only the how but also the why of conversions. This…

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To Play the Fool: The Book of Esther in Early Modern German, English, and Yiddish Drama

Monday, February 12, 2018 @ 4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Royce Hall 314, 10745 Dickson Plaza
Los Angeles , CA 90095 United States
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Scholars of Yiddish literature have proposed that the first extant Purim Shpiel (Purim Play) continued the tradition of early modern German and English dramatizations of the Book of Esther. Jews would have gone to see these plays performed in the ports, inns, and streets of early modern Germany, and adapted them to their own, very riotous, holiday festivities. In this talk, Dr. Chanita Goodblatt (Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) discusses three plays, within a multi-cultural and multi-temporal context: Meistersinger Hans…

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