Undergraduate Courses

Winter 2022

American Indian Studies (AM IND)
AM IND M10 – Introduction to American Indian Studies
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
This is a multiple-listed class:
American Indian Studies (AM IND) M10 – Introduction to American Indian Studies
World Arts and Cultures (WL ARTS) M23 – Introduction to American Indian Studies
Course Description: (Same as World Arts and Cultures M23.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; activity, one hour. Survey of selected Native North American cultures from pre-Western contact to contemporary period, with particular emphasis on early cultural diversity and diverse patterns of political, linguistic, social, legal, and cultural change in postcontact period. P/NP or letter grading.

Ancient Near East (AN N EA)
AN N EA 12W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Seminar: Sem 1
Course Description: Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Arabic
ARABIC 150 – Classical Arabic Literature in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings in English; knowledge of Arabic not required. Survey of premodern Arabic cultural production in its political, religious, and social contexts. Coverage of pre-Islamic Arabia, rise of Islam, and major themes of Southwest Asian history, along with significant figures and moments in literature and culture of premodern period. Consideration of selected modern responses to Arabic tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

Architecture and Urban Design (ARCH&UD)
ARCH&UD 10A – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Rovner, M.A.; Osman, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. P/NP or letter grading.

Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS 31 – Art of India and Southeast Asia
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Hall, R.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Discussion of selection of monuments and objects from Indian subcontinent and Southeast Asia using key historical, cultural, and religious concepts. Analysis of each monument or object in detail, with their relationships compared and contrasted. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M111 and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C139C – Inca Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Exploration of art, architecture, and urbanism of Incas from their empire’s height in late 15th century to their political and cultural fragmentation during Spanish occupation of Andes (1532 to 1824). Concurrently scheduled with course C239C. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: The Mystical Nihilism of Hieronymus Bosch
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

Chinese (CHIN)
CHIN 50 – Chinese Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Li, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50W. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Introduction to most important aspects of Chinese culture. Topics include early Chinese civilization, historical development of Chinese society, issues of ethnicity, Chinese language and philosophy, and early scientific and technological innovation. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN 110B – Introduction to Classical Chinese
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Duthie, N.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 110A. Grammar and readings in selected premodern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

Clusters (CLUSTER)
CLUSTER 27B – Global Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.; Chism, C.N.; Guhin, J.J.; Slyomovics, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 27A. Introduction to Islam, immensely diverse global tradition which is second largest religion. Study of Islam and Muslims within framework of study of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across world. Examination of Islam’s evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity–when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia–to modern era where it is practice from U.S. to Indonesia. Concentration on broad analytical categories in study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history. Study also of case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought. Letter grading.

English (ENGL)
ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 142R – Later Medieval Literature: Research Component: Chaucer, Springtime, and Plague
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). Substantial research component included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Late medieval England was time of rebellion, revolution, and (small number of) heretics burned at stake. Reading springtime world of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, however, one would be hard-pressed to know that medieval England was riven with political divisions and struggling with crises of class, gender, and religious identities; alongside relentless march of disease and medicine, technology and superstition, international trade, and reactionary provincialism. What, then, are histories that medieval English literature creates and obscures? Studentsl learn how to develop historical research questions, conduct research, and begin to answer those questions in substantial literary critical papers. Students read Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales and selections of connected Middle English verse and prose to ask meaningful literary critical questions about wider medieval world. Assignments include one 5- to 6-page paper, final 20-page paper, and 15-minute presentation on research project.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Category of holy life offers space for thinking through relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and rebellion and conformity. Ranging from lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, focus on ways in which holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged norms of medieval church by rebelling against–and at same time conforming to–them. Students close-read lives (vitae) of such women (and some holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, and from travel to enclosure. Questions discussed include why holy women came to play increasingly dominant roles in Middle Ages; and how they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical structures designed to control their lives.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Major Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to Shakespeare’s plays through survey of plays historically and contemporarily recognized as some of his most consequential. Drawing on dramatic works from entirety of his career, emphasis on formal and historical properties of Shakespeare’s plays (and stage); and ways they continue to engage questions of race, gender, sexuality, and class, as well as questions of religion, philosophy, and politics. How all these questions are embodied, or put into bodies, signals way Shakespeare’s dynamic poetry has become essential hallmarks for defining both modern and global. Possible texts include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest. Includes term paper, midterm exam, and final exam.

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 159 – Topics in Literature, circa 1500 to 1700: Beauty in Early Modern English Poetry
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wagner, A.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Examination of literatures from or about this time period. Consult Schedule of Classes for subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of early modern English poetic constructions of beauty. Reading sonnets, epyllia, and narrative poems by Greville, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, and others, examination of how poetic representations of beauty created normative expectations about race and gender, and how English elite conceived of beauty within increasingly global contexts. Examination of visual materials, including early modern portraits and jewels, to help consider exchange value of sonnets within English court’s gift culture. Readings also include critical essays on race and gender, and excerpts from travel narratives, scientific works, and early modern literary criticism.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Dreams, Visions and Nightmares in Medieval Literature
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how ancient Mediterranean epic provided medieval European romance with various character types, narrative patterns, themes and imagery relating to war, eros, justice, spirituality, community, and journey or quest. Texts include Augustine’s Confessions, Homer’s Odyssey, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Lais of Marie de France, The Song of Roland, and Vergil’s Aeneid. Assignments includes weekly reports and one 10- to 12-page research essay to be adapted for presentation at mini-conference. Enrollment by instructor consent; see Senior Capstone/Seminars at https://english.ucla.edu/courses-undergraduate/winter-2022/ for application instructions.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Women’s Work and Medieval Slavery
Seminar: Sem 4
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: In 2019, UCLA Library acquired deed for sale of slave woman, Magdalena, from one woman to another in 1401 Barcelona. Identified as neophyte from Tartary, Magdalena’s story raises many literary (and historical) questions about past. Focus on this primary document, and series of literary and historical questions that radiate out from it. Students read clusters of primary medieval texts that focus on slavery in medieval Europe, representations of domesticity and gendered medieval labor, medieval romance depictions of Tartar east, and writing by medieval women. Students write shorter midterm paper and final 20-page paper. Students also make formal 15-minute presentation on their research project. Not open for credit to students who completed course 142R with same title in winter 2020.

European Languages and Transcultural Studies (ELTS)
ELTS 112 – Medieval Foundations of European Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stahuljak, Z.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered French 112.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to and tracing of genealogy of some of most important medieval concepts and institutions, such as empire and state, religion, university, architecture and visual arts, identity, class, race, and sexuality, foundational for European civilization. Exploration of birth of modern nations from their medieval foundation. Examination of cultural production: how and why certain values were created and then passed on. P/NP or letter grading.

History (HIST)
HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units:5
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
African American Studies (AF AMER) M10A – History of Africa to 1800
History (HIST) M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Course Description: (Same as African American Studies M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 11B – History of China, circa 1000 to 2000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Goldman, A.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of later history of China–evolution of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from circa 1000 to 2000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, cultural, and economic aspects of early modern regimes and empires and rise of modern China into contemporary era. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 21 – World History, circa 600 to 1760
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Outline of world history from rise of Islam to start of Industrial Revolution, structured around a broad chronological narrative of salient developments. Use of thematic and comparative approaches, with certain recurring themes and institutions that modulate from culture to culture. Reading of variety of contemporary accounts to look at way people perceived cultures outside their own. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Limpieza de Sangre, Casta, and Race in Iberian World, 1391 to 1800
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ibarra, R.P.; Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Transatlantic view of hidalguía (inheritable nobility), limpieza de sangre (blood purity), and casta (caste or race) concepts. Consideration of how they were theorized and put into practice, and how scholars envision their contribution to European racialized thinking. Although primarily focused on Iberian Atlantic, study also incorporates recent work extending these questions into Iberian Pacific and Indian Ocean. Consideration of contexts, from late-Medieval anxieties of miscegenation produced by forced conversions in Iberian kingdoms to 18th-century production of casta paintings that purported to represent various degrees of racial mixture. Consideration of institutions, practices, clothing, and food roles in labeling others. Exploration of contemporary critiques of inquisitorial mindset. Students write substantial term paper, and gain experience leading discussions, peer reviewing, and presenting their work visually and verbally.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Philosophy and Utopia in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to discipline of intellectual history. Detailed introduction to how to practice it, in order to make sense of key text in early modern political philosophy: Thomas More’s Utopia (1516). Readings about intellectual history in general–and early modern political, moral, and social theory in particular–are included. Focus on exploration of imaginative and intellectual world of Thomas More’s famous text, title of which pioneered new genre of European political writing. Endlessly enigmatic, profoundly imaginative, and often very funny indeed, More’s text also remains intensely controversial. Study tries to explain why.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Roman Inquisition: New Questions, New Perspectives
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Tutino, S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Roman Inquisition is one of most fascinating institutions in early modern Europe. Since 1998, when its archive was finally opened for research, great deal has been learned about its protagonists; victims; agenda; and political, theological, and intellectual significance in early modern Europe. Discussion of these recent findings on history of Inquisition. Students also exposed to some primary sources coming from Inquisition archive. Students learn how historians use these and other kinds of documentary sources in research.

HIST 105B – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1300 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Koh, C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 111B – Topics in Middle Eastern History: Early Modern: Middle East, 1300 to 1700: from Nomads to Sultans
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Momdjian, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Istanbul in Ottoman period (1453 to 1923); relationship between history and literary imagination and view of history as dialogue between past and present; scholarly debate on urban history of early-modern Middle East; introduction to corpus of theories (world economy paradigm) through discussion of Ottoman port cities. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to over six centuries of Ottoman history, and placement of it in context of world history. Study covers rise of Ottomans from small principality to world empire, with special attention to different aspects of its complex history such as succession, methods of rule, center-periphery relations, and relations with West. Through examination of various themes and aspects of empire–such as its ethnic and religious diversity, military, and institutional organization– students become familiar with Ottoman state, society, and culture; and role they played in Middle East and world history. Study concentrates on history of empire, then highlights economy, culture, and society through study of trade, commodities, and everyday empire life.

HIST 116B – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 122A – Cultural and Intellectual History of Modern Europe, 15th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Climates of taste and climates of opinion. Educational, moral, and religious attitudes; art, thought, and manners of time in historical context. Renaissance cultural and intellectual history of Europe. Central themes include comparative history of ideas, theory and practice of art and architecture, civic and religious humanism, religious experience, and new cultural genres of history and philological scholarship. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 129A – Social History of Spain and Portugal: Age of Silver in Spain and Portugal, 1479 to 1789
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of popular history in Iberian Peninsula. Emphasis on peasants and urban history, gold routes, slave trade, history of women, and development of different types of collective violence. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 170A – Culture and Power in Late Imperial China
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Von Glahn, R.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Recommended preparation: courses 11A, 11B. Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of relations of power and cultural expressions of dominance and resistance in late imperial China (1000 to 1700), with emphasis on interplay of economic forces, ideas, and social and political institutions. Examination of institutions of state, family, school, and city; idioms of folk religion, death, and afterlife; political, legal, and medical discourses of body, personhood, and social identity; love, sexuality, and private life. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pirnazar, N.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Iranian M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Course Description: (Same as Iranian M178 and Jewish Studies M178.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to political, intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic status of Iranian Jews. Exploration of history of Iranian Jews from ancient period throughout history, with focus on post-Middle Ages to present time. Topics, studied from perspective of Iranian cultural and intellectual history, include identity and status, religious tolerance versus forced conversion, Iranian Jewish emancipation, and dynamic symbiosis between Iranian Jews and other Iranians. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 179B – History of Medicine: Foundations of Modern Medicine
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Zeleny, C.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191B – Capstone Seminar: History–Medieval: World of Cairo Geniza
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of medieval history from bottom up, through everyday documents produced and used by men and women at all levels of society: state decrees, personal and business letters, legal contracts, court records, lists of charity recipients, and accounts. Documents include those in Cairo Geniza collection. Even smallest details of these writings tell big things about world in which they were written. Weekly in-depth focus on particular document or set of documents that reveal aspects of politics, religion, class, commerce, material history, gender norms, and family relationships. Introduction to some social history methodology, as well as critical stances of field. Goal is for students to engage in branch of social history using these kinds of materials.

HIST C191O – Topics in History: World: Religion in Early Modern Europe and European Empires
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 191O.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Reading and discussion of selected topics, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. May be concurrently scheduled with course C201W. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of conceptual debates and empirical studies of past generation or two regarding religion in Europe and European overseas empires of period 1500 to 1800. Examination of series of readings organized in broad–but not strict–chronological sequence. Study includes conflicts in Iberian Peninsula around 1500, Reformation and Catholic renewal, and Enlightenment. Initially focusing largely on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, study also examines European perceptions of non-European religions. Students write capstone paper.

Indo-European Studies (I E STD)
I E STD M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lundquist, J.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Indo-European Studies (I E STD) M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Linguistics (LING) M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Course Description: (Same as Linguistics M150.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: Linguistics 1 or 20. Indo-European languages (ancient and modern), including their relationships, chief characteristics, writing systems, and sociolinguistic contexts; nature of reconstructed Indo-European proto-language and proto-culture. One or more Indo-European languages may be investigated in detail. P/NP or letter grading.

Iranian
IRANIAN 103B – Advanced Persian: Introduction to Classical Persian Prose
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

IRANIAN M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pirnazar, N.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Iranian M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Course Description: (Same as History M178 and Jewish Studies M178.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to political, intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic status of Iranian Jews. Exploration of history of Iranian Jews from ancient period throughout history, with focus on post-Middle Ages to present time. Topics, studied from perspective of Iranian cultural and intellectual history, include identity and status, religious tolerance versus forced conversion, Iranian Jewish emancipation, and dynamic symbiosis between Iranian Jews and other Iranians. P/NP or letter grading.

Islamic Studies (ISLM ST)
ISLM ST M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119C and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M50.) (Same as Religion M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

Italian
ITALIAN 114B – Middle Ages: Medieval Humor, Moralism, and Society
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burns, R.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Novelty of Boccaccio’s witty and comic masterpiece, Decameron, analyzed within context of moral and social codes of culture of time. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 116B – Italian Renaissance: Power and Imagination in Renaissance
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Gaylard, S.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of artistic world of Leonardo, Raffaello, Michelangelo, Titian, and literary masterpieces of Machiavelli, Castiglione, Ariosto, Tasso, in world molded by powerful political forces, such as Roman Papacy and Medici, Gonzaga, and D’Este courts. P/NP or letter grading.

Japanese (JAPAN)
JAPAN CM160 – Japanese Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Japanese (JAPAN) CM160 – Japanese Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M161B – Japanese Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Religion M161B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading.

Jewish Studies (JEWISH)
JEWISH M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pirnazar, N.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Iranian M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M178 – Introduction to History and Culture of Iranian Jews
Course Description: (Same as History M178 and Iranian M178.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to political, intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic status of Iranian Jews. Exploration of history of Iranian Jews from ancient period throughout history, with focus on post-Middle Ages to present time. Topics, studied from perspective of Iranian cultural and intellectual history, include identity and status, religious tolerance versus forced conversion, Iranian Jewish emancipation, and dynamic symbiosis between Iranian Jews and other Iranians. P/NP or letter grading.

Korean (KOREA)
KOREA C150 – Korean Literature in Translation: Classical
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Park, H.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 150.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Korean not required. Survey of premodern Korean literature from beginning to 19th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C250. P/NP or letter grading.

KOREA 180B – History of Korea, 1260 through 1876
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Wang, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Examination of evolution of Korean culture and society within context of political and institutional industry. Consideration of both higher and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading.

Linguistics (LING)
LING M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lundquist, J.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Indo-European Studies (I E STD) M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Linguistics (LING) M150 – Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics
Course Description: (Same as Indo-European Studies M150.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 1 or 20. Indo-European languages (ancient and modern), including their relationships, chief characteristics, writing systems, and sociolinguistic contexts; nature of reconstructed Indo-European proto-language and proto-culture. One or more Indo-European languages may be investigated in detail. P/NP or letter grading.

Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD)
M E STD M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119C and Islamic Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

Musicology (MUSCLG)
MUSCLG CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Activity: Act 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Winkle, M.D.; Stein, D.R.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Music (MUSC) M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Musicology (MUSCLG) CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History CM90T.) (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with course C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

Philosophy (PHILOS)
PHILOS 100B – Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):  King, Peter (University of Toronto)
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended requisite: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes. P/NP or letter grading.

Political Science (POL SCI)
POL SCI 191C – Variable Topics Research Seminars for Majors: Politics: Magna Carta at 806
Seminar: Sem 1
Units:4
Instructor(s): Orren, K.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Preparation: two upper-division courses in field in which seminar is offered. Limited to junior/senior Political Science majors with 3.25 grade-point average in upper-division political science courses. Consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be applied toward distribution or concentration requirement. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study of deep roots of American constitution, principles established as early as 12th century and still operative in cases today. Principles covered include constitutionalism, rule of law, protection of property, and due process. Includes secondary reading on legal history and contemporary U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Students complete term paper.

Religion, Study of (RELIGN)
RELIGN M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Slavic M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M60D – Religion in Classical India: Introduction
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60D – Religion in Classical India: Introduction
South Asian (S ASIAN) M60 – Religion in Classical India: Introduction
Course Description: (Same as South Asian M60.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to religions of classical India–Vedic, Brahmanical, Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist–paying equal attention to change and continuity, with emphasis on chronological development. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
This is a multiple-listed class:
Asian M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Asian M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60A. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

RELIGN M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M161B – Japanese Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Japanese (JAPAN) CM160 – Japanese Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M161B – Japanese Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Japanese CM160.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Letter grading.

Scandinavian (SCAND)
SCAND 138 – Vikings
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of history, anthropology, and archaeology of Viking Age society. Readings draw on medieval sagas as well as secondary material, focus on impact of Vikings on northern Europe, and consider ways in which European and Scandinavian societies evolved in response to Viking incursions. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 165B – Vikings on Film
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Exploration of representations of Vikings in medium of film, considering Viking films within their historic and cultural contexts. How does representation of Vikings on film correspond to historical reality of Vikings? What have Vikings come to signify in modern era and why? Do we see development in idea of Vikings over time that is reflected in films from different periods? How do representations of Vikings in films produced in Scandinavia differ from their representations in films from other cultures? How do we see changing ideas about gender, ethnicity, dis/ability, sexual preference, and other aspects of identity reflected in Viking films? Development of critical thinking and close textual analysis skills. All readings and films in English or with English subtitles. P/NP or letter grading.

Slavic (SLAVC)
SLAVC M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Religion M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 11A – Catalan Language and Culture I
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Oronich, R.; Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, six hours. Preparation: at least two years of college-level Spanish, Portuguese, or another Romance language other than Catalan. Introduction to oral and written Catalan language. Part I of two-term accelerated language sequence equivalent to three terms of traditional pattern and designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Conquest and Colonization of Latin America: Character Types and Literary Representations
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.