Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2020

 

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Schniedewind, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

ARABIC M106 – Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Arabic M106 – Qur’an; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M108 – Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Religion M108.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Qur’an, its early history, and form and function as scripture in Muslim history, civilization, and culture. Focus also on Qur’anic interpretation, its relationship to Islamic law, and Qur’an in contemporary discourses such as human rights, feminism, and contemporary reform movements. Primary sources include excerpts from Qur’an, Qur’anic interpretation, and selected writings of Muslim thinkers and reformists. Strong focus on analytical and writing skills through in-class assignments and discussion. Letter grading.

ARABIC M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Slyomovics, S.E.
This is a multiple-listed class: Arabic M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla; Comparative Literature (COM LIT) M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Course Description: (Same as Comparative Literature M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 115C – Romanesque Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 21. Art and architecture of Western Europe in 11th and 12th centuries. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C120 – Selected Topics in Islamic Art: Art and Technology in Medieval Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in Islamic art and architecture that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C220A. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of intersection between art and technology in medieval Islamic world (600-1500). Themes include representation of technology in paintings and diagrams; agency of instruments and machines; relation between technology, body, and labor; science, magic, and wonder; transcultural aspects of Islamic technology; and critical approaches to golden age of Islam.

ART HIS C139C – Inca Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Exploration of art, architecture, and urbanism of Incas from their empire’s height in late 15th century to their political and cultural fragmentation during Spanish occupation of Andes (1532 to 1824). Concurrently scheduled with course C239C. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS CM141 – Colonial Latin American Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Black, C.V.
This is a multiple-listed class: Art History (ART HIS) CM141 – Colonial Latin American Art; Chicana and Chicano Studies (CHICANO) M187B – Colonial Latin American Art
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C141.) (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M187B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Art and architecture of colonial Americas from 16th to 18th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C241. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSIC 140 – Topics in History of Greek Literature: Marble and Mud: Inventing Greece, from Renaissance to Weimar
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Zenios, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 10 or 40W. Investigation of specific issue in understanding of Greek literature, such as definition of one genre or evaluation of particular author. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Fascination with Greece has been steady beat in rhythm of Western and global thought. Examination of artistic, historical, and theoretical articulation of philhellenic movements to pose broader questions. Those include whether ideas of liberty, democracy, and equality can be used to promote domination and totalitarianism; what ethics of speaking for those that have no right to self-expression are; how past can be used to identify or distinguish modernity; and whether good art is supposed to attack or pacify eyes. Discussion topics include classical culture and self-proclamation of modernity; Greek art and modern aesthetics, from beautiful to primitive and ugly; and Hellenism and representation of otherness, from travelogs to contemporary exhibition practices. Particular attention paid to literature and philosophy of Romantic Hellenisms, and their implication with political projects of revolution and imperialism.

CLASSIC 144 – Topical Studies in Ancient Culture: Legacy of Ancient Medicine
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Touwaide, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: one course from 10, 20, 30, 40W, or 41W. Investigation of one problem in ancient culture that involves discussion of both Greek and Roman material. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: According to widely diffused opinion, medicine was among major achievements of ancient Hellenic culture and it provided foundations of Western art of healing. However exact this idea might be, it does not explain why and how ancient medicine could have been source of present-day medicine. Investigation of topics such as how ancient medicine was transmitted through centuries; how it was assimilated into–and/or determined–Western medicine and science; or whether it can be considered source of modern medicine, and if so, why and how. To approach these and other similar questions, examination of history of medicine through Mediterranean from most remote antiquity to dawn of modern medicine, and even later. Study of components such as transmission of knowledge; and translation, adaptation, criticism, or rejection of classical medicine. Analysis of discoveries traditionally considered as fundamental to development of modern medicine.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Introduction to Popular Culture
Seminar: Sem 7
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Hassnaoui, A.; Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to variety of critical approaches used in study of popular culture. Although study draws on familiarity with popular culture, it approaches subject from scholarly perspective. Exploration of how popular culture, in all its forms, not only reflects world around us but also influences how we perceive world. Every day we are exposed to thousands of images, sounds, and experiences that we understand as natural–as just way world is. But everyday life we take for granted is anything but natural. It is both product and creator of shared worldview. Examination of wide range of subjects (e.g., film, television, music, advertising, Internet, and geography) using wide range of critical approaches (e.g., genre theory, gender studies, semiotics, and political economy), to better understand how contemporary American culture shapes our lives.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Lost and Found: Tolkien’s Invented Mythology
Seminar: Sem 8
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Bellairs, J.M.; Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Readers often comment on expansiveness of J.R.R. Tolkien’s masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings. This expansiveness is usually attributed to sense of massive history of Middle Earth, of which readers often get only glimpse. Close reading of Tolkien’s The Silmarillion, in which one finds not just invented history, but entire mythology, using elements from several real-world myths and stories. Using analytical skills and approaches learned, examination of The Silmarillion as (re)constructed mythology. Prior reading of The Lord of the Rings recommended.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Love and War: Trojan Conflict(s), from Ancient Greece to Early Modern England
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Study traces western European evolution of several key figures from Trojan War, beginning with ancient epic and tragedy, culminating in close reading of several selections from early modern English poetry and drama (including Shakespeare). Other material investigated includes Roman adaptations of Trojan story, Christian moralizations of pagan inheritances, and visual culture of continental Renaissance. Consideration of how each later culture (re)used and (re)imagined figures of classical mythology to reflect its own contemporary experiences and concerns. Includes quizzes, reading responses, and final paper.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Tales as Old as Time: Fairy Tales across Time, Culture, and Form
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.; Schiffman, B.L.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Thanks to Disney, everyone knows Beauty and the Beast fairy tale; but film is not whole story, it is just one version of this popular tale. Study uses Disney films as jumping-off point to examine how folk and fairy tales evolve through time, across cultures, and across media (e.g., film, folktale collection, picture book, podcast, YouTube video, and more). Study looks at how stories such as Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella evolve, and how audience experience changes with these evolutions. Weekly viewing of Disney film, and reading, viewing, or listening to other versions of tale; as well as reading of secondary sources about story and presentation media. Readings include scholarship from disciplines of folklore studies, media studies, sociology, and more. Students gain knowledge about these iconic tales, and become equipped to talk about evolution of story and impact of media on story and storytelling.

COM LIT 2BW – Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

COM LIT M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Slyomovics, S.E.
This is a multiple-listed class: Arabic M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla; Comparative Literature (COM LIT) M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Course Description: (Same as Arabic M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Weaver, E.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 148 – Cultures of Middle Ages: Romancing Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Interdisciplinary survey of particular medieval societies, with special emphasis on complex interactions between different ethnic and cultural traditions of medieval world. Examination of processes of intercultural encounter and transmission: classical or patristic traditions into medieval culture, crusade, travel literature, and literature of contact zones, including interactions between Celtic, Anglo, and Norman societies, and debates between Pagans, Jews, Christians, and Muslims. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Current anti-Muslim racism tries to erase long and complex history of mutual rapprochement, influence, and aversion. Students read pre-modern texts concerning Islam, from Muslim and Latin Christian writers, to explore pre-modern Islamic imaginaries from many perspectives. Muslim writers meditated upon relations of humans, God, and natural world; many writings were translated and conveyed into European languages. Meanwhile, in Latin Christendom, romance proved to be genre well-suited to speculation, nightmare, thought experiment, and reverence. Theories of literary world-making used to put past and present into conversation and illuminate complex discourses–beyond orientalism–circulated before European hegemony. Texts may include 1001 Nights, Aucassin and Nicolette, Conference of Birds, Hayy ibn Yaqhan, story of Tawaddud/La Doncella Teodor, Arabic and Old French versions of life of Buddha, historical accounts of Salah al-Din, stories from Boccaccio’s Decameron, and travel narratives by Muslims and non-Muslims in Mediterranean and Asia.

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: World War Medieval
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: J.R.R. Tolkien writes how his passion for fantasy was “wakened by philology on the threshold of manhood, and quickened to full life by war.” In aftermath of 20th-century global wars, Tolkien was not alone. Exploration of strange relationship between modern global warfare and medievalist fantasy. Weaving between medieval epics and 20th-century fantasy, novels, and history, exploration of fantasy’s role as both means of escape from war trauma, and way of coming to better grips with it. Drawing on critical theories of trauma and fantasy world-making, students read historical novels about World War I–such as Pat Barker’s Regeneration–next to Tolkien’s Fellowship of the Ring (with excerpts from The Two Towers and The Return of the King); T.H. White’s The Book of Merlin, and Susan Cooper’s Dawn of Fear and The Dark is Rising, with medieval texts such as Malory’s Mort d’Arthur, Alliterative Morte Arthure, and Hervor’s Saga. Includes two short papers, optional presentation or creative project, weekly response papers, and discussion.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 153 – Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts–masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari–alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 157 – Translation and Innovation in English Renaissance and Early Modern Period: Epic Heroes
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gerber, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Epic heroes are dominant, self-reliant, and competitive. These traits also define toxic masculinity, with which even Renaissance writers grappled, considering that these values defied their Christian emphases on Christ’s suffering, selflessness, and acceptance. As result, Renaissance heroes often seem misplaced, such as Milton’s epic about Satan. Study recreates journey of classical epic hero into Renaissance England, including some of its Italian and Spanish intermediaries and modern instantiations. Analysis of how epic genre shaped conflicting notions of masculinity, while also normalizing sociocultural hierarchies that valorize their heroes. Questions addressed include what epic hero is; what epic’s modern forms are; and ultimately, what epics can teach about our own vexed notions of heroism and national identity. Not open for credit to students enrolled in course 182B for spring quarter 2020.

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: Epic Fail: How Renaissance Killed Classic Hero
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gerber, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult Schedule of Classes for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Investigation of Renaissance of classical epics, broadly defined as long narrative poetry describing heroic deeds of ancient civilizations. Problem is Christianity supposedly killed epic, introducing Christ-like values that undermined classical heroics. Results often misplace forms of heroism, such as Milton’s elaboration of Book of Genesis with Satan as central hero. Such misplaced heroics challenged historical form that Renaissance writers revived; and promoted its survival even up to modern blockbusters, which repeatedly bandy epic as descriptor for dramatic marketing effects. Study recreates journey of classical epic into Renaissance England; and considers Italian and Spanish intermediaries, and modern media instances. Analysis of how epic genre–used to valorize heritage of particular peoples and construct national identities–became pedestrian meme for labeling failure, approaching classical revival from transhistoric and transregional perspective. Study asks what epic is, what its modern forms are, how it survived, and what it can teach us.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Longer Poems, and Their Tudor Contexts
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Consideration of Shakespeare’s sonnets and his two narrative poems, Venus and Adonis and Rape of Lucrece, alongside sonnets and narratives by Daniel, Drayton, Sidney, Spenser, Surrey, Wyatt, and others; and forms in which those poems were published and consumed. Some literary, book, and publishing history, all in one package. Students present at least one secondary text on relevant subject, and write 15- to 20-page paper making use of appropriate secondary criticism. Essential preparation: familiarity with early modern English.

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Inquisition: Power and Faith in Middle Ages
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Iafolla, R.J.; Hudson, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: In early 13th century, Pope Gregory IX ordered inquisition into “heretical depravity” to combat outbreak of religious dissent in southern France. At first, it simply meant using new procedures for conducting investigations and trials. But scope of inquisition quickly expanded until it became method for identifying, prosecuting, and punishing many forms of deviance. In particular, study covers origins and nature of inquisition; experiences of accused heretics on trial; expansion of inquisition to new targets like Jews, holy women, and saints; inquisitorial methods of control over individuals and communities; and Spanish Inquisition and its legacy. Students complete short writing assignments to develop writing and research skills, and final paper. Students develop historical questions, identify relevant sources, and deploy evidence in support of an argument.

HIST 105B – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1300 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M106 – Premodern Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M106 – Premodern Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M106A – Premodern Islam
Course Description: (Same as Religion M106A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of early development of Islam with special attention to doctrine of nature of God, human responsibility, guidance, revelation and religious authority, duties of believers, ritual, law, sectarian movements, mysticism, and popular religion. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116B – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 125D – History of Low Countries
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of aspects of Dutch (and on occasion Belgian) history from medieval period to period after World War II, with emphasis on political and cultural history. Topics include Middle Ages, Dutch Republic in 17th and 18th centuries, Low Countries from 1830 to 1918, Netherlands and Belgium in context of Europe after 1945. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 129A – Social History of Spain and Portugal: Age of Silver in Spain and Portugal, 1479 to 1789
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of popular history in Iberian Peninsula. Emphasis on peasants and urban history, gold routes, slave trade, history of women, and development of different types of collective violence. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M50.) (Same as Religion M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST 291A – Variable Topics in Islamic Studies: Islamic Thought: Al-Ghazali
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Selected topics on Islam. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading.
Class Description: Overview of major themes in Islamic thought (kalam, fiqh, tasawwuf, falsafa, etc.) during early and middle periods. Study takes central figure, Abu Hamid al-Ghazali, as focal point. Emphasis on reading, contextualizing, and understanding Arabic texts. Requires reading knowledge of Arabic language.

ITALIAN 113 – Dante’s “La Divina Commedia”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 100. Taught in Italian. Study of medieval philosophy, religion, and politics in “La Divina Commedia,” greatest literary achievement of the age. P/NP or letter grading.

JAPAN 165 – Introduction to Japanese Buddhist Texts
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 110A or Chinese 165 or Japanese placement test. Readings in premodern Buddhist texts written by Japanese in Sino-Japanese or Kambun and mixed Japanese/Chinese literary styles concerning textual commentaries, doctrinal treatises, hagiographies, temple histories, etc. Coverage varies. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Letter grading.

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

M E STD M133 – Bible and Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
This is a multiple-listed class: Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M133 – Bible and Qur’an; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M133 – Bible and Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Religion M133.) Lecture, three hours. Survey of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, and Qur’an to familiarize students with content of scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and sociocultural background from which these multifarious texts emerged, and to explore major themes and consider variety of approaches to scripture. Development of appreciation for role scripture plays in these religious systems and in American culture and society. P/NP or letter grading.

MUSCLG CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Activity: Act 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Winkle, M.D.; Stein, D.
This is a multiple-listed class: Music (MUSC) M90T – Early Music Ensemble; Musicology (MUSCLG) CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History CM90T.) (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with course C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

PHILOS 104 – Topics in Islamic Philosophy: Self, Knowledge, and Society in Al-Farabi and Avicenna
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Crager, A.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three to four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one philosophy course. Development of philosophy within orbit of Islam from beginning of interaction of Islam with ancient philosophy to period of hegemony of Ottoman Empire. Figures examined may vary but usually include many of al-Kindi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, ben Maimon (Maimonides), Ibn Rushd (Averroes), and Suhrawardi. Topics include central issues in metaphysics and epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study of self, knowledge, and society in classical Islamic philosophy. Particular focus on twin titans of formative period of Islamic philosophy (falsafa): Al-Farabi and Avicenna (Ibn Sina). Exploration of philosophical psychology of Avicenna. Study covers Avicenna’s innovative conception of human self/soul (al-nafs), his advances in cognitive psychology, and his account of knowledge as psychological phenomenon. Exploration of Al-Farabi’s philosophy of discourse (mantiq) and political philosophy. Study covers Farabi’s development of epistemology from perspective of logical theory, his influential account of nature and point of religion, and his approach to knowledge as sociopolitical phenomenon.

RELIGN M106A – Premodern Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M106 – Premodern Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M106A – Premodern Islam
Course Description: (Same as History M106.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of early development of Islam with special attention to doctrine of nature of God, human responsibility, guidance, revelation and religious authority, duties of believers, ritual, law, sectarian movements, mysticism, and popular religion. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M108 – Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Arabic M106 – Qur’an; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M108 – Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Arabic M106.) Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Qur’an, its early history, and form and function as scripture in Muslim history, civilization, and culture. Focus also on Qur’anic interpretation, its relationship to Islamic law, and Qur’an in contemporary discourses such as human rights, feminism, and contemporary reform movements. Primary sources include excerpts from Qur’an, Qur’anic interpretation, and selected writings of Muslim thinkers and reformists. Strong focus on analytical and writing skills through in-class assignments and discussion. Letter grading.

RELIGN M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions: Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M133 – Bible and Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
This is a multiple-listed class: Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M133 – Bible and Qur’an: Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M133 – Bible and Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M133.) Lecture, three hours. Survey of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, New Testament, and Qur’an to familiarize students with content of scriptures of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and sociocultural background from which these multifarious texts emerged, and to explore major themes and consider variety of approaches to scripture. Development of appreciation for role scripture plays in these religious systems and in American culture and society. P/NP or letter grading.

RUSSN 90A – Introduction to Russian Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Pilshchikov, I.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to Russian culture and society from earliest times to 1917. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 172A – Nordic Folk and Fairy Tales
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Exploration of Nordic version of classic tale-types such as Dragon Slayer, Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, and King Lindorm in historic and cultural contexts. Reading of important works of Nordic and international folktale scholarship, representing historical-geographic, structuralist, psychological, feminist, disability-theory, and queer-theory approaches. Development of critical thinking and close textual analysis skills, and understanding and appreciation of genre that continues to pervade popular culture. Readings in English translation. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 11B – Catalan Language and Culture II
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Soley Mateu, A.; Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, six hours. Requisite: course 11A. Introduction to oral and written Catalan language. Part II of two-term accelerated language sequence equivalent to three terms of traditional pattern and designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies: Love and Social Order in Medieval Sentimental Romance
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Delgado Garcia, N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include Convivencia (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Sentimental romance is literary genre that enjoyed great popularity in Spain during 14th and 15th centuries. In these fictions, love turns into despair due to impossibility of reaching it. European novel is, among others, product of narrative and thematic innovation that Spanish sentimental fiction entailed. Study of some characteristic topics of medieval sentimental romance: love and passion (unrequited or shattered); sexuality and social order; presence of author’s voice in narration; and allegories of death or its presence as final resolution, among others. Examination of classical influences that served as preamble for development of narrative on topic of love in Middle Ages. Close reading of selected fragments of representative texts; these are analyzed to explore dynamics of failed love in feudal nobility of time. Also covers topics of madness, death, and treatment of women as lover and beloved. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Performing One’s Life in 17th-Century Transatlantic Spanish World
Lecture: Lec 2
Units:4
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Performance shaped existence of 17th-century individuals. Men and women–regardless of class and race–gathered at theater, eager to see and to be seen. Even outdoors, ephemeral architecture and fireworks transformed cities and turned citizens into spectators. However, at end of day, everyone realized that human hearts and minds supplied curious with most genuine and mysterious spectacle to see. Students read plays by Miguel de Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Juan Ruiz de Alarcón, Sor Juana, Calderón, and others. They guide students through world in which suspicion that everyone in street was performing role was only too real. Individuals feared that other was concealing his or her true self. It became necessary to develop tools to peep into people’s minds, while keeping one’s own under lock. Only smartest ones realized that even to spy on others was often easier than to look inside oneself.

SPAN 160 – Topics in Spanish Linguistics: Historical Evolution of Spanish and Portuguese: Phonology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Quicoli, A.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 25. Exploration of origin of language, how Spanish is acquired, evolution of Spanish from Latin to early modern period, how Spanish varies in world, how to teach Spanish, Spanish in contact with other languages. Possible topics include Spanish in Los Angeles, history of Spanish language, first- and second-language acquisition, language and cognition. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study traces evolution of sound system of modern Spanish and Portuguese from vulgar Latin within context of modern linguistics theory. Topics include language acquisition and linguistic change; theory of linguistic change; phonological rules, and concept of phonological change; sound system of classical Latin and vulgar Latin; and evolution of Spanish and Portuguese vowels and consonants. Texts include instructor reader and additional assigned readings.