Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2022

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5.0
Instructor Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Arabic

ARABIC 130 – Classical Arabic Texts
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from premodern literary texts, with grammatical and syntactical analysis. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

ARABIC M110 – One Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Slyomovics, S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Course Description:
(Same as Comparative Literature M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “One Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading.

Art History (ART HIS)

ART HIS 29 – Chinese Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lee, H.; Von Falkenhausen, L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to Chinese art, covering all major periods from Neolithic to modern age. Presentation of monuments as well as artifacts in variety of media in their social and historical contexts. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 119B – Eastern Islamic Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Overton, K.H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers through Afghanistan and parts of central Asia; Ottoman Empire. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS CM141 – Colonial Latin American Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Rivas, C.A.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C141.) (Same as Chicana/o and Central American Studies M187B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Art and architecture of colonial Americas from 16th to 18th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C241. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C160 – Art and Empire
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Medvedev, N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Examination of relationship between art and imperial ideologies and introduction to current issues in colonial studies and postcolonial criticism. Concurrently scheduled with course C260A. P/NP or letter grading.

RT HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Recovering Sacred Places – Architecture and Landscapes of American Empire
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how ecological knowledge has informed how landscapes are understood and experienced; and how this in turn has shaped how architecture is made, and given meaning. Focus on ephemeral architectural practices in Americas. Includes extensive reading, writing, discussion. Students attend The Forgotten Canopy: Ecology, Ephemeral Architecture, and Imperialism conference at Clark Library.

Chinese (CHIN)

CHIN 187 – Chinese Etymology and Calligraphy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended requisite: course 3. Coverage of (1) development of Chinese writing system from pottery inscriptions 6,000 years ago to modern simplified forms and studies of six scripts principles that were used to form Chinese characters and (2) aesthetic training of calligraphic art and its appreciation, with focus on ways of recognizing and interpreting cursive style, common form of handwriting. Letter grading.

Classics (CLASSIC)

CLASSIC M121 – Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sissa, G.
Course Description: (Same as Political Science M111A.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, St. Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and More and questions such as forms of government, citizenship, justice, happiness, rhetoric, religion, emotion. P/NP or letter grading.

Clusters (CLUSTER)

CLUSTER M27A – Global Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Young, A.; Yarbrough, L.B.; Slyomovics, S.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 27A.) (Same as Islamic Studies M27A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M27A is enforced requisite to M27B, which is enforced requisite to M27CW. Introduction to Islam, immensely diverse global tradition which is second largest religion. Study of Islam and Muslims within framework of study of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across world. Examination of Islam’s evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity–when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia–to modern era where it is practice from U.S. to Indonesia. Concentration on broad analytical categories in study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history. Study also of case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought. Letter grading.

Comparative Literatire (COM LIT)

COM LIT M110 – One Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Slyomovics, S.
Course Description: (Same as Arabic M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “One Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading.

English (ENGL)

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 19 – Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Category of holy life offers space for thinking through relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and rebellion and conformity. Ranging from lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, focus on ways in which holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged norms of medieval church by rebelling against–and at same time conforming to–them. Students close-read lives (vitae) of such women (and some holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, and from travel to enclosure. Questions discussed include why holy women came to play increasingly dominant roles in Middle Ages; and how they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical structures designed to control their lives.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Major Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to Shakespeare’s plays through survey of plays historically and contemporarily recognized as some of his most consequential. Drawing on dramatic works from entirety of his career, emphasis on formal and historical properties of Shakespeare’s plays (and stage); and ways they continue to engage questions of race, gender, sexuality, and class, as well as questions of religion, philosophy, and politics. How all these questions are embodied, or put into bodies, signals way Shakespeare’s dynamic poetry has become essential hallmarks for defining both modern and global. Possible texts include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, Romeo and Juliet, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest. Includes term paper, midterm exam, and final exam.

ENGL 156 – Devotion and Dissent: Literature of English Reformations
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Examination of religious thought and practice associated with Reformation and Counter-Reformation enterprises in early modern period and consideration of how various types of writing–poems, prayer books, sermons, historical chronicles, essays, travel narratives, trial records–reflect and assess religious ferment of era. Coverage of either broad historical range such as from Henry VIII’s break with Rome to execution of Charles I or one specific topic such as varieties of martyrdom, art of confession, or conversion narratives. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Overview of major texts of English Reformations–Catholic as well as Protestant, Elizabethan as well as Henrician and Edwardian. Study then turns to literature of spiritual inwardness, literature that includes great religious lyrics of early 17th century. Includes weekly paper on assigned readings. No midterm or final examination.

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: Shakespeare’s Second Tetralogy
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult Schedule of Classes for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Detailed study of four works that make up Shakespeare’s second tetralogy of English history plays: Richard II; Henry IV parts 1 and 2; and Henry V. Students acquire some familiarity with Shakespeare’s chronicle sources and dramatic precedents; competing early modern historiographical models and methods; genre theory; performance theory; political situation and social concerns of England in late 1590s when plays are written (i.e., not just early 1400s, when plays are set); and needs of harried property manager. Study also samples some of many filmed treatments of these plays.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Dreams, Visions, and Nightmares in Medieval Literature
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Dreams, visions, and nightmares are constitutive of medieval literature writ large. They are ubiquitous in hagiographical writings, academic commentaries, theological treatises, and poetic compositions. They often inaugurate treatises and tales, raise expectations, and fulfill or even frustrate audience expectations. Wherever they occur, they offer space for thinking through relations between real and visionary; historical and fantastic; empirically verifiable and spiritually valuable; and between medieval discourses or disciplines including rhetoric, history, law, and theology. Exploration of dreams, visions, and nightmares in texts ranging from lives of holy women and men to great poetic works of Chaucer and Langland. Focus on ways that writers handle dream experiences for content and form. Students read fictional compositions framed by dreams, visions, and nightmares alongside relevant dream theories/commentaries. Not open for credit to students who completed 184 sections titled Dreams, Visions, and Apparitions in winter 2020 or spring 2021.

European Languages and Transcultural Studies (ELTS)

ELTS 151 – Valkyries and Dragonslayers: Völsung/Nibelung Tradition
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of medieval Norse and German traditions of Völsung and Nibelung families (Eddas, sagas, Nibelungenlied), as well as modern versions in various media (e.g., Wagner’s Ring Cycle, Fritz Lang’s Nibelungen films), in their historic and cultural contexts. Instruction and texts in English. P/NP or letter grading.

History (HIST)

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Phillips, D.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Tutino, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

History (HIST)
HIST 2C – Religion, Occult, and Science: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in Western Tradition, 1000 to 1600
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Specific aspects of elite and popular culture in medieval and early modern Europe. Manner in which men and women sought to explain, order, and escape terrors of their lives by embracing transcendental religious experiences and dreaming of apocalypse and witchcraft. Examination of experiences in context of genesis of the state, birth of a new science, and economic and social change. P/NP or letter grading.

History (HIST)
HIST 3A – History of Science: Renaissance to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Alexander, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of beginnings of physical sciences involving transformation from Aristotelian to Newtonian cosmology, mechanization of natural world, rise of experimental science, and origin of scientific societies. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 8A – Colonial Latin America
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Terraciano, K.B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 8AH. General introduction to Latin American history from contact period to independence (1490s to 1820s), with emphasis on convergence of Native American, European, and African cultures in Latin America; issues of ethnicity and gender; development of colonial institutions and societies; and emergence of local and national identities. Readings focus on writings of Latin American men and women from the period studied. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 9A – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of India
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introductory survey for beginning students of major cultural, social, and political ideas, traditions, and institutions of Indic civilization. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 9D – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to history of Muslim world from advent of Islam to present day. P/NP or letter grading

HIST 20 – World History to AD 600
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Green, N.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Examination of earliest civilizations of Asia, North Africa, and Europe–Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, India, China, Greece, and Rome–from development of settled agricultural communities until about AD 500, with focus on rise of cities, organization of society, nature of kingship, writing and growth of bureaucracy, varieties of religious expression, and linkage between culture and society. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 89 – Honors Seminars
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Limited to 20 students. Designed as adjunct to lower-division lecture course. Exploration of topics in greater depth through supplemental readings, papers, or other activities and led by lecture course instructor. May be applied toward honors credit for eligible students. Honors content noted on transcript. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 111B – Topics in Middle Eastern History: Early Modern: Ottoman-European Encounters in Early Modern Period: Diplomacy, Trade, Piracy, and Travelers
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Momdjian, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Istanbul in Ottoman period (1453 to 1923); relationship between history and literary imagination and view of history as dialogue between past and present; scholarly debate on urban history of early-modern Middle East; introduction to corpus of theories (world economy paradigm) through discussion of Ottoman port cities. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Early modern period is defined as age of exploration and discovery for Europe, and its encounters with different peoples–whose culture, art, and religion were constantly judged in opposition to European standard. This was true in particular of Ottoman Empire, whose so-called savage and nomadic ways did not measure up to high European criteria. Through variety of primary and secondary sources, examination of simplistic accounts of Western representation of Oriental East. Discovery of encounters and interactions that took place between Ottoman Empire and Western nations, and transcended boundaries between Europe and Ottoman Empire. While focusing on topics such as diplomacy, trade, piracy, travelers, statesmen, and women, students learn about different actors that made these encounters happen, and myriad exchanges and encounters that took place in early modern period.

HIST 119D – Topics in Medieval History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Special topics in history of Middle Ages, including religion in society, justice and law, politics of war and diplomacy, economic upheaval and renewal, and cultural representations. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
Course Description: (Same as Russian M118.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 187B – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Medieval
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 187F – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Near East: Everyday Ottoman Life: Material Culture and Commodities in Early Modern Period
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Momdjian, M.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminars on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to culture and history of Ottoman Empire. Examination of commodities ranging from most luxurious enjoyed by wealthy elite, to most mundane used daily by majority of population. Examination of how these items shaped and marked identity and social class of consumers.

Iranian

IRANIAN 103A – Advanced Persian: Introduction to Classical Persian Poetry
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

IRANIAN 55 – Gender and Sexuality in Arts and Literatures of Iran and Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Multifaceted introduction to Persian poetry, recognized as jewel of Persian culture, and to pictorial, architectural, performative, cinematographic, and photographic dimensions of artistic milieu spanning between Balkans, India, and Central Asia from 10th century CE to present. With consideration of centrality of discourses on identity, desire, and spirituality to core of Persian aesthetics, study of broad variety of socioanthropological, ethical, and historiographical issues stemming from both mainstream topics characterizing extensive field of Iranian studies and most controversial conversations on nature of sexuality, ethnicity, and religion. P/NP or letter grading.

Islamic Studies (ISLM ST)

ISLM ST M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M110.) (Same as Religion M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M27A – Global Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.; Guhin, J.J.; Chism, C.N.; Slyomovics, S.
Course Description: (Same as Clusters M27A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course M27A is enforced requisite to M27B, which is enforced requisite to M27CW. Introduction to Islam, immensely diverse global tradition which is second largest religion. Study of Islam and Muslims within framework of study of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across world. Examination of Islam’s evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity–when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia–to modern era where it is practice from U.S. to Indonesia. Concentration on broad analytical categories in study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history. Study also of case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought. Letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN 110 – Dante in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Close study of one of world’s greatest literary geniuses, particularly of his masterpiece, “Divine Comedy,” the archetypal medieval journey through the afterworld. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 116A – Italian Renaissance: Renewal of Art and Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ciavolella, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of Quattrocento and its representatives in arts and humanistic thought (i.e., Mantegna, Botticelli, Pico, Valla, and Ficino). P/NP or letter grading.

Japanese (JAPAN)

JAPAN 50 – Japanese Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Duthie, T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Survey of development of Japanese culture and its relationship to Asiatic mainland. P/NP or letter grading.

JAPAN 110A – Introduction to Classical Japanese: Basic Grammar
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Duthie, T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 100C or 100S or Japanese placement test. Introduction to fundamentals of classical Japanese. Grammar and reading of selected premodern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

JAPAN C159 – Variable Topics in Culture and Society in Japan
Lecture: Lec 1
Units:4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Examination of relationship between culture (art, literature, film) and society in Japan. Reading, audio and visual material, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit with topic change. Concurrently scheduled with course C259. P/NP or letter grading.

JAPAN CM160 – Japanese Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
Course Description: (Same as Religion M161B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading.

Korean (KOREA)

KOREA 50 – History of Korean Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wang, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. General survey of development of Korean culture within context of political, social, and economic history. P/NP or letter grading.

Musicology (MUSCLG)

MUSCLG 125A – History of Western Music: Era of Church and Patron
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History 125A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6A (may be taken concurrently). Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of church and court patronage, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques. Letter grading.

Philosophy (PHILOS)

PHILOS C110 – Spinoza
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Carriero, J.P.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one philosophy course. Selected topics in philosophy of Spinoza. May be concurrently scheduled with course C210. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled. P/NP or letter grading.

Religion, Study of (RELIGN)

RELIGN M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M109.) (Same as Islamic Studies M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M161B – Japanese Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
Course Description: (Same as Japanese CM160.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Letter grading.

Russian (RUSSN)

RUSSN M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
Course Description: (Same as History M127A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian (SCAND)

SCAND 40W – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including Nibelungenlied, Völsunga Saga, Eddas, and Beowulf. Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 11A – Catalan Language and Culture I
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff; Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, six hours. Preparation: at least two years of college-level Spanish, Portuguese, or another Romance language other than Catalan. Introduction to oral and written Catalan language. Part I of two-term accelerated language sequence equivalent to three terms of traditional pattern and designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies: Mapping Iberia: Geocritical Approaches to Medieval and EarlyModern Narratives
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include Convivencia (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to rich Iberian medieval and early modern literature and culture through lenses of geocriticism and space. Examination of Iberian literature, cultural objects, maps, and popular practices allow exploration of fascinating encounters among different religious, ethnic, and linguistic groups in Peninsula; and understanding of spatial shifts throughout its history. Topics examined include historical processes, fluidity of political boundaries, role of Mediterranean Sea in peninsular mercantile networks, urban and rural spaces, public rituals, gendered spaces, imperial architectures, dynamics of spatial appropriation, and complex subtleties that shaped medieval and early modern Iberian spatiality.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Written on Ocean: Ships and Sailors in Colonial Spanish American Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study of figures of sailors, pilots, and cartographers–and their journeys–as place of enunciation in early modern colonialism. Focus on exploration of great expeditions by sea that achieved circumnavigation and cartography of American continent, and most renowned navigators; but also expeditions of smaller magnitude charged to recognize ocean coastlines. Examination of meaning of transportation used to cross oceans and explore coasts; and ship as locus of enunciation in texts and maps. Readings in Spanish; taught in Spanish.