Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2020

 

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Arabic

ARABIC 130 – Classical Arabic Texts
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from premodern literary texts, with grammatical and syntactical analysis. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

Art History

ART HIS 22 – Renaissance and Baroque Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Wilson, B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Renaissance and baroque art. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C115D – Gothic Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of Europe in 13th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C215D.

ART HIS 119A – Western Islamic Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers to Spain, 7th to 16th century.

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance.

ART HIS CM141 – Colonial Latin American Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Black, C.V.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) CM141 – Colonial Latin American Art
Chicana and Chicano Studies (CHICANO) M187B – Colonial Latin American Art
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C141.) (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M187B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Art and architecture of colonial Americas from 16th to 18th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C241.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Art and Technology
Seminar: Sem 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations.
Class Description: Exploration of intersection of art, labor, and technology, with focus on medieval Islamic period. Topics include representation of instruments and machines in objects, texts, and images; use of tools and instruments in artmaking; and relationship of body, instrument, and labor. Study also foregrounds philosophical, transregional, and transhistorical discussions.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Digital Gothic
Seminar: Sem 2
Units 4
Instructor(s) Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations.
Class Description: Students learn to reconstruct now-lost/destroyed monuments of medieval Paris in CAD-based software. No previous knowledge/experience of CAD is required, although comfort level with computers and some background in architectural history (especially study involving medieval architecture) is helpful. Goal is to understand ways in which these magnificent buildings, normally described as Gothic, were developed and constructed, as well as their history and use over time. Historic preservation and conservation are also topics of discussion.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Poussin in Arcadia
Seminar: Sem 3
Units 4
Instructor(s) Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations.
Class Description: Looks at Arcadian mythology in work of French Baroque painter, Nicolas Poussin.

Comparative Literature

COM LIT 4AW – Literature and Writing: Antiquity to Middle Ages
Discussion: Dis 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Black, S.R., The Staff
Course Description: Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A or 2AW. Study and discussion of selected texts from antiquity to Middle Ages, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts include works and authors such as “Iliad,” “Odyssey,” “Gilgamesh,” Sappho, Greek tragedies, “Aeneid,” Petronius, “Beowulf,” or Marie de France.

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required.

ENGL 19 – COVID-19: The Black Death in Literature
Seminar: Sem 5
Units 1
Instructor(s) Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA.
Class Description: The Black Death swept into England in 1348, and killed 40 to 60 percent of population. Such devastation is unimaginable; yet amidst COVID-19, it has become a little more legible. Students read selections of medieval poetry and prose written in aftermath of plague, and consider some ways literature and other art forms did (and did not) respond to the Black Death.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement.

ENGL M105A – Early Chicana/Chicano Literature, 1400 to 1920
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Lopez, M.K.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Chicana and Chicano Studies (CHICANO) M105A – Early Chicana/Chicano Literature, 1400 to 1920
English (ENGL) M105A – Early Chicana/Chicano Literature, 1400 to 1920
Course Description: (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M105A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of Chicana/Chicano literature from poetry of Triple Alliance and Aztec Empire through end of Mexican Revolution (1920), including oral and written forms (poetry, corridos, testimonios, folklore, novels, short stories, and drama) by writers such as Nezahualcoyotl (Hungry Coyote), Cabaza de Vaca, Lorenzo de Zavala, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Eusebio Chacón, Daniel Venegas, and Lorena Villegas de Magón.

ENGL 110B – Writing in English Major: Adjunct: Academic Writing about Shakespeare and Milton
Seminar: Sem 1
Units 2
Instructor(s) Bonnici, K.B.
Course Description: Seminar, two hours. Students must be concurrently enrolled in affiliated English lecture course (consult Schedule of Classes for courses so designated). Improvement and refinement of writing about literature. Brings together students enrolled in base American Literature and Culture or English courses in workshop setting to advance their discipline-specific writing skills, especially art of developing literary critical analysis and argument. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor or lecture course change.
Class Description: Designed to help English majors improve and refine their academic writing about early modern literature, particularly works of Shakespeare and Milton. Brings together students enrolled in designated base Shakespeare or Milton courses in workshop setting to advance their discipline-specific writing skills, especially art of developing literary critical analysis and argument.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.”

ENGL 141R – Early Medieval Literature: Research Component: Early Medieval Literature of North Atlantic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Weaver, E.M.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Substantial research component included.
Class Description: Study asks what earliest British literature was like; who created it; and what it meant to read and write at time when Irish, English, Welsh, and Norse were only just beginning to be written down. To answer these questions, students solve riddles, snoop through thousand-year-old medical texts and so-called catalogues of vice, and retrace Icelandic voyages to Americas and imaginary letters from India. Students also meet some time travelers, transgender saints, and African philosophers who shaped early English thought and writing while working toward final research project.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change.
Class Description: Category of holy life offers space for thinking through relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and rebellion and conformity. Ranging from lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, focus on ways in which holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged norms of medieval church by rebelling against–and at same time conforming to–them. Students close-read lives (Vitae) of such women (and some holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, and from travel to enclosure. Questions discussed include why holy women came to play increasingly dominant roles in Middle Ages; and how they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical structures designed to control their lives.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances.

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.”

ENGL 152 – Literatures of English Renaissance and Early Modern Period: Elizabethan Literature: Poetry, Politics, and Print
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works in their cultural context.
Class Description: Intensive study of explosion of non-dramatic English literature composed during reign of Elizabeth I (1558-1603). Concerns include how literary production was impacted by political, religious, and gender concerns; and how authors experimented with variety of literary forms as they undertook to create “a kingdom of our own language” (in Edmund Spenser’s words) in new marketplace of print.

French

FRNCH 116 – Studies in Renaissance French Culture and Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Carron, J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Taught in French. Study of Renaissance French culture and literature, including la Pléiade and 16th-century poetry, linguistic and poetic revolution, novel and early prose, and late French humanism.
Class description: Intolerant Renaissance – Alterity, during the European Renaissance, is born out of ruptures, reforms, “discoveries,” or gender relations. FR116 problematizes the ensuing intolerance in the encounter with new worlds, the Reformation, the anti-medieval renewal, and gender. See Calvin, Dentière, Labé, Navarre, Rabelais, Ronsard, Du Bellay, Montaigne, religious pamphlets, travel documents, and films. In French.

History

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Phillips, D.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms.

HIST 3A – History of Science: Renaissance to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Alexander, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of beginnings of physical sciences involving transformation from Aristotelian to Newtonian cosmology, mechanization of natural world, rise of experimental science, and origin of scientific societies.

HIST 8A – Colonial Latin America
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Terraciano, K.B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. General introduction to Latin American history from contact period to independence (1490s to 1820s), with emphasis on convergence of Native American, European, and African cultures in Latin America; issues of ethnicity and gender; development of colonial institutions and societies; and emergence of local and national identities. Readings focus on writings of Latin American men and women from the period studied.

HIST 9D – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to history of Muslim world from advent of Islam to present day.

HIST 19 – 1619 v. 1620: Slaves, Pilgrims, and Competing U.S. Origin Stories
Seminar: Sem 5
Units 1
Instructor(s) Pestana, C.G.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA.
Class Description: Explanation of country?s origins reveals much about its values and concerns. After American Revolution, Plymouth Plantation emerged as preferred origin story, one of religious piety, hard work, and family values. Plymouth won out over alternate story, romanticized, elite origin story of first Virginians, including “Princess” Pocahontas as well as certain English migrants. In our era, different vision of Virginia’s origins story gained attention through New York Times Magazine “1619 Project,” emphasizing slavery with 1619 cargo of Africans sold in the colony. Plymouth also got updated somewhat, with 400th anniversary celebrations of landing at Plymouth addressing more critically devastating effects of arrival of Europeans on lives of Native inhabitants. In both cases, American origins’ celebratory tone was challenged by hard realities of exploitation and dispossession. Focus on dueling origins myths, how they have changed over time, and what they say about politics of the moment.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History
Seminar: Sem 3
Units 4
Instructor(s) Tutino, S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods.
Class Description: Roman inquisition is one of most fascinating institutions in early modern Europe. Until very recently, it was also one of lesser known, because its archives used to be inaccessible. In 1998, Vatican opened archives of inquisition and of Index of Prohibited Books, which allowed new generation of scholars to get inside this mysterious and powerful institution and learn more about its protagonists; victims; and political, theological, and intellectual role in early modern Europe. Discussion of these recent findings. Students exposed to some primary sources coming from archive, and learn how historians use these and other kinds of documentary sources in their research. Students not only deepen their knowledge of institution and its significance, but also work on improving their ability to formulate arguments, use primary sources, and write historical research papers.

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development.

HIST 111B – Topics in Middle Eastern History: Early Modern
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Istanbul in Ottoman period (1453 to 1923); relationship between history and literary imagination and view of history as dialogue between past and present; scholarly debate on urban history of early-modern Middle East; introduction to corpus of theories (world economy paradigm) through discussion of Ottoman port cities.

HIST 119B – Medieval Europe, 1000 to 1500
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Basic introduction to Western Europe from Latin antiquity to age of discovery, with emphasis on medieval use of Greco-Roman antiquity, history of manuscript book, and growth of literacy.

HIST M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Lenhoff, G.D.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Russian (RUSSN) M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Course Description: (Same as Russian M118.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom.

HIST 135A – Europe and World: Exploration and Conquest, 1400 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. First phase of European expansion in Americas, Africa, and Eurasia. Analysis of motives and methods of expansion, differing patterns of European settlement, including plantation economy, and development of new commercial networks, including Atlantic slave trade.

HIST 149A – North American Indian History, Precontact to 1830
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Madley, B.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. History of Native Americans from contact to present, with emphasis on historical dimensions of culture change, Indian political processes, and continuity of Native American cultures. Focus on selected Indian peoples in each period.

HIST 164B – Topics in African History: Africa and Slave Trade
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one prior course in African history at UCLA. Designed for juniors/seniors. Social, economic, political, and cultural impact of slave trade on African society, with emphasis on Atlantic trade without neglecting those of ancient Mediterranean, Islamic, and Indian Ocean worlds. Abolition and African diaspora.

HIST 167B – History of East Africa
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s) Wint, H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of cultural diversity of east Africa from earliest times to growth of complex societies, its place within wider Indian Ocean system, and colonial conquest to gaining of independence and postcolonial challenges.

HIST 179A – Variable Topics in History of Medicine
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics may include global health, biomedical technologies, gender and medicine, Chinese medicine, psychiatry and mental illness, medicine and empire, epidemics and infectious disease. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic/instructor change.

HIST 180A – Topics in History of Science
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics may include science and colonialism, science and religion, environmental history, science in Enlightenment, development of theory of evolution, science and public policy, public nature of science.

HIST 191C – Capstone Seminar: History–Europe: Poverty Through Ages: London 1350-1850
Seminar: Sem 3
Units 4
Instructor(s) Paul, T.
Course Description:
Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project.
Class Description: Examination of poverty and attitudes towards the poor over 500-year period. Meanings of poverty and treatment by society. Impact of gender and race on experiences of poverty. Consideration of impact of events like Plague and Industrialization on lives of the poor, and how poverty transitioned from religious ideal in Medieval Europe to condition that was punished in workhouses of 18th and 19th centuries. Focus on London, one of wealthiest cities in Europe, but also extreme inequality. Drawing on digital history methodologies, students use primary sources to access lives of people who left very little behind. Final project is public history project. Students conduct original historical research and present findings in public online exhibition.

Iranian

IRANIAN 55 – Gender and Sexuality in Arts and Literatures of Iran and Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Multifaceted introduction to Persian poetry, recognized as jewel of Persian culture, and to pictorial, architectural, performative, cinematographic, and photographic dimensions of artistic milieu spanning between Balkans, India, and Central Asia from 10th century CE to present. With consideration of centrality of discourses on identity, desire, and spirituality to core of Persian aesthetics, study of broad variety of socioanthropological, ethical, and historiographical issues stemming from both mainstream topics characterizing extensive field of Iranian studies and most controversial conversations on nature of sexuality, ethnicity, and religion.

IRANIAN 103A – Advanced Persian: Introduction to Classical Persian Poetry
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor.

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M110.) (Same as Religion M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism.

Italian

ITALIAN 110 – Dante in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s) Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Close study of one of world’s greatest literary geniuses, particularly of his masterpiece, “Divine Comedy,” the archetypal medieval journey through the afterworld.

ITALIAN 116B – Italian Renaissance: Power and Imagination in Renaissance
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of artistic world of Leonardo, Raffaello, Michelangelo, Titian, and literary masterpieces of Machiavelli, Castiglione, Ariosto, Tasso, in world molded by powerful political forces, such as Roman Papacy and Medici, Gonzaga, and D’Este courts.

Jewish Studies

JEWISH M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Bonesho, C.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Course Description: (Same as Religion M10.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Judaism?s basic beliefs, institutions, and practices. Topics include development of biblical and rabbinic Judaism; concepts of god, sin, repentance, prayer, and the messiah; history of Talmud and synagogue; evolution of folk beliefs and year-cycle and life-cycle practices.

Musicology

MUSCLG CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Activity: Act 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Winkle, M.D.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Music (MUSC) M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Musicology (MUSCLG) CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History CM90T.) (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion.

MUSCLG 125A – History of Western Music: Era of Church and Patron
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Upton, E.R.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History 125A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6A (may be taken concurrently). Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of church and court patronage, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques.

Philosophy

PHILOS 5 – Philosophy in Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Normore, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Philosophical inquiry into such themes as freedom, responsibility, guilt, love, self-knowledge and self-deception, death, and meaning of life through examination of great literary works in Western tradition.

PHILOS C110 – Spinoza
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Hiltunen, A.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 21. Study of philosophy of Spinoza. May be concurrently scheduled with course C210, in which case there is weekly discussion meeting, plus fewer readings and shorter papers for undergraduates.

PHILOS C119 – Topics in History of Philosophy: Faith Seeking Understanding: Anselm’s Argument throughout History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Study of selected philosophers or themes in history of philosophy from different periods (e.g. ancient and medieval, medieval and early modern). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C219.
Class Description: Does God exist? Depends on what God is. Maybe God is something than which nothing greater can be thought. It seems like such a thing has to exist. Why? Well, assume for sake of argument that it doesn’t. In that case, think of something greater than it–namely, something that does exist. Therefore think of something greater than something than which nothing greater can be thought. But that’s a contradiction, and so our assumption was wrong. So something than which nothing greater can be thought–that is, God–exists. Not convinced? That’s fair: this argument, devised by Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109), is one of the most confounding and controversial–yet intriguing–in history of philosophy. Many excellent philosophers have criticized it over centuries, and still it’s proven remarkably resilient. Examination of Anselm’s argument, attend to its broader context, and consideration of various interpretations and assessments from Middle Ages up to present day.

Religion, Study of

RELIGN M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Bonesho, C.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M10 – Introduction to Judaism
Course Description: (Same as Jewish Studies M10.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Judaism?s basic beliefs, institutions, and practices. Topics include development of biblical and rabbinic Judaism; concepts of god, sin, repentance, prayer, and the messiah; history of Talmud and synagogue; evolution of folk beliefs and year-cycle and life-cycle practices.

RELIGN M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M109.) (Same as Islamic Studies M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism.

RELIGN 55 – Spirit of Medicine
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Gillespie, R.T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of relationship between medicine, religion, and society; how religion is help or hindrance to health; and what health care might look like beyond biomedical clinic. Examination of historical entwinement of religion, medicine, and society in Western antiquity to early modern period; disentanglement in Englightenment to early 20th century; and confluence of science, technology, and capitalism in biomedicine compartmentalized from religion today. Conceptualization of rhetorics and epistemologies of healing–what it means to be healed and how one would know–and put in tension with faith healings and religion-as-medicine, medicine-as-religion, and integrated approaches. Analysis of alternatives to biomedical status quo in theoretical medicine and in health care delivery, with particular attention to questions of justice and holistic care in U.S. and of policy and practice globally.

Russian

RUSSN M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Lenhoff, G.D.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Russian (RUSSN) M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Course Description: (Same as History M127A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom.

Scandinavian

SCAND 40 – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40W. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including Nibelungenlied, Völsunga Saga, Eddas, and Beowulf. Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts.

SCAND 40W – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including Nibelungenlied, Völsunga Saga, Eddas, and Beowulf. Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts.

SCAND 134 – Scandinavian Mythology
Seminar: Sem 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Overview of major gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, narratives and adventures that make up lore collectively referred to as Scandinavian, or Norse, myth. Reading and examination of this lore that is chiefly preserved in two collections traditionally called “Poetic (or Elder) Edda” and “Prose (or Younger) Edda.”

Spanish

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies: Sex and Power in Medieval Iberia
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Powell, E.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include Convivencia (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus.
Class Description: Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures and visual representations, including poetry, prose and art, with emphasis on the 13th, 14th, and 15th centuries. Possible topics include prostitution, gender and desire, queer Iberia, holy sadomasochism, medieval sex, and power and identity. Students analyze works by Abraham ibn Ezra, Alfonso Martínez de Toledo, Arcipreste de Talavera de la Reina, Johan Roís de Corella, Juan Rodríguez del Padrón, Juan Ruiz, Arcipreste de Hita, Leonor López de Córdoba, Lluís Borrassà, and Sor Isabel de Villena. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Conquest and Colonization of Latin America: Character Types and Literary Representations
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 4
Instructor(s) Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry.
Class Description: First Europeans to arrive on American continent were group of conquerors, travelers, soldiers, missionaries, sailors, and wanderers who moved throughout New World as it was interpreted by those who just arrived, and as unknown world by those still living in Old one. Following different character types–sailor, wanderer, conqueror, castaway, woman, captive, traitor, etc.–study of different literary representations of Latin American colonial world. Taught in Spanish.