Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2019

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Schniedewind, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

ARABIC 150 – Classical Arabic Literature in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings in English; knowledge of Arabic not required. Survey of premodern Arabic cultural production in its political, religious, and social contexts. Coverage of pre-Islamic Arabia, rise of Islam, and major themes of Southwest Asian history, along with significant figures and moments in literature and culture of premodern period. Consideration of selected modern responses to Arabic tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

ARCHEOL M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Burke, K.S.
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119D, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 51.) Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottoman, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ART HIS M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 121C – Italian Renaissance Art of 16th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Wilson, B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 106C.) Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of 16th century. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 108A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C126 – Selected Topics in Early Modern Art: Making Worlds: Art, Materiality, and Early Modern Globalization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Wilson, B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in early modern art that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C226. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Explanatory narratives of colonialism, empire building, and religious conversion–of center, periphery, and globalization–have been under revision in recent years, in order to nuance understanding of what were immensely complex and multifaceted phenomena. Study shifts focus, from governing regimes and institutions to ways in which creative forms and practices were intertwined in dynamics of materiality and early modern globalism. Analysis directed toward flow of materials, artifacts, and motifs across borders and bodies of water. Units: 4

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: In Text and Image: Indigenous Perspective on Colonization in Andes
Instructor: Nair, S.E.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 127.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of Guaman Poma’s texts and images to glean rare insights they provide on Andean history, art, and architecture. In addition to close examination of Poma’s original manuscript and images, examination of those drawings he made for another colonial manuscript (Getty Manuscript by Murua), currently held in Getty rare book library. Examination of secondary sources that explore life and work of Guaman Poma, as well as early colonial art, history, and cultural in Andes. Units: 4

ASIAN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Asian M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Religion M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

CLASSIC 51B – Art and Archaeology of Ancient Rome
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Beckmann, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, 75 minutes. Survey of major period, theme, or medium of Roman art and archaeology at discretion of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

CLUSTER 21CW – History of Modern Thought: Special Topics: Exploration of Modern Otherness through Works of William Shakespeare
Seminar: Sem 5
Units: 6
Instructor(s):TA, Porter, T.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 21CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 21B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Examination of cross-section of classical and modern social theories and debates that shape them. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Study offers framework to question Western conceptions of race, gender, gender roles, and sex through exploration of selected Shakespeare plays. Examination and consideration of statements about such topics as feminism and consent, and what Shakespeare plays teach us about current hot-button issues: whether there are hidden messages that, quite frankly, help directly or indirectly navigate these scenarios in play’s time or modern context. Consideration of theoretical and political stakes.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Goddesses and Art: Depiction of Women in Art, from Ancient Greeks to Fashion Week
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Brown, H.B.; Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Depiction of female form in artistic media across world is one of most common subject matter choices, but how did this start? Students look at how women became subject of art created by men while being oppressed in their own societies. By looking at art of ancient Greeks, through Renaissance painting, all the way to modern films and advertising, students analyze reason this art is created and by whom; and learn about goddesses that inspired it. Mythological stories introduced in previous terms, as well as other stories and academic/historical research, used to understand fascination with female form throughout history.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Ice and Fire: Patterns of History and Theory in Westeros
Seminar: Sem 4
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of first three books of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series from number of literary and theoretical perspectives, including several of those already introduced in previous terms. Close reading of excerpts from A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, and A Storm of Swords alongside selections of literary theory–including ideas of gender, conflict, and violence. Students practice shaping and presenting analytical arguments through theoretical lens. Students also spend time with medievalism of Martin’s Westeros, considering some historical details reflected in novels. Students without prior knowledge of novels or television show (seasons 1 through 4) expected to familiarize themselves with plot, character, etc. to extent that they are able to participate meaningfully in class discussion. Those considering enrollment should also be aware of (and comfortable with) graphic representations violence and sexuality in this material.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Lost and Found: Tolkien’s Mythology
Seminar: Sem 5
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Bellairs, J.M.; Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Readers often comment on expansiveness of J.R.R. Tolkien’s masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings. This expansiveness is usually attributed to sense of massive history of Middle Earth, of which readers often get only a glimpse. Close reading of professor Tolkien’s The Silmarillion, in which is found not just history, but entire mythology; invented, but using elements from several real-world myths and stories. Using analytical skills and approaches studied in cluster, examination of The Silmarillion as (re)constructed mythology. Prior reading of The Lord of the Rings recommended.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth–Special Topics: Grim(m) Indeed: Modern Retellings of Fairy Tales
Seminar: Sem 6
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Lorhan, L.B.; Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Analysis of classic fairy tale retellings such as Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, Rumpelstiltskin, and Snow White. Readings include selections from works of Margaret Atwood, Angela Carter, Robert Coover, Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Anne Sexton, and Jane Yolen. Consideration of how tales from Grimm canon have been adapted for film, ranging from arthouse cinema (Pablo Berger’s Blancanieves) to horror flicks (Yim Pil-Sung’s sumptuous Henjel gwa Gueretel) and animated features (Tangled), as well as retellings for television (Grimm and Faerie Tale Theatre).

COM LIT 2BW – Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Stahulijak, Z.
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Shuger, D.K.
Course Description:Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL M101A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures: Queer Figures of Allegory and Covenant in Premodern Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gallagher, L.
This is a multiple-listed class:
English (ENGL) M101A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures
Gender Studies (GENDER) M105A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies (LGBTQS) M101A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures
Course Description: (Same as Gender Studies M105A and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M101A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of discrete period of queer literature from beginning to circa 1850. Works by such writers as Sappho, Plato, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Thomas Gray may be included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of representative literary and philosophical texts from premodern period (biblical and classical antiquity through medieval and early-modern eras) that depict wide-ranging perceptions of intersections of erotic desire, gender markings, and codes of communal belonging. Because term queer is not native to these texts, survey of influential theories of subjectivity and social dynamics in contemporary literary and cultural studies to show how to read for queer and queering elements in premodern literatures and cultures. Assigned texts include: Plato’s Symposium; Acts of Apostles; martyrological Passion of Saints Perpetua and Felicity; Alain de Lille’s Complaint of Nature; Chaucer’s Pardoner’s Tale; Christine de Pisan’s City of Ladies; Marlowe’s Edward II, and Hero and Leander; Richard Barnfield’s Affectionate Shepherd; and Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

ENGL 112E – Food and Fantasy in Irish Tradition and Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Nagy, J.F.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Food, cooking, feeding, eating, and drinking as powerful cultural symbols in Irish oral and literary tradition from medieval to modern times. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 141 – Early Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Jager, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Texts and topics include “Beowulf,” Vikings, poems on women, Bede, and King Alfred. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 146 – Medieval Story Cycles and Collections: Medieval Frame Narratives and Antiauthoritarianism
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Gerber, A.
Course Description Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of medieval story cycles and story collections as narrative forms. Medieval story cycles engage in complex literary conversations across medieval cultures, periods, genres, and languages, while story collections often stage art of storytelling within narrative frame to invite self-consciousness about powers of literary production itself. Texts may include cycles such as texts gathered as “Matter of Britain,” “Matter of Rome,” or “Matter of France”; also “Mabinogi,” manuscript collections such as Auchinleck manuscript or Exeter book, framed narratives such as “Decameron,” “Canterbury Tales,” “1001 Nights,” and Gower’s “Confessio Amantis,” or collections of exempla, legends, and dicta. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of golden age of frame narratives–namely 14th and 15th centuries–when writers across Europe turned to inset tales to give voice to those formerly excluded from literary corpus. Following tradition formulated both in antiquity (Ovid’s Metamorphoses) and Near East (One Thousand and One Nights), medieval frame narratives learned to interweave stories from different perspectives about various peoples. Examination of how these medieval appropriations fused old literary influences with new character voices. Study covers inherited cornucopia of tales that helped create antiauthoritarian politics, from perspective of historically underrepresented cultures. Units: 5

ENGL 148 – Cultures of Middle Ages: Traveling Worlds
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Interdisciplinary survey of particular medieval societies, with special emphasis on complex interactions between different ethnic and cultural traditions of medieval world. Examination of processes of intercultural encounter and transmission: classical or patristic traditions into medieval culture, crusade, travel literature, and literature of contact zones, including interactions between Celtic, Anglo, and Norman societies, and debates between Pagans, Jews, Christians, and Muslims. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Focus on intercultural interaction in Middle Ages between four great traditions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and classical antiquity. Exploration of narratives of travel, trade, pilgrimage, and geography as opportunities for world-building. Beginning with classical geographies and histories that construct late-antique pagan worlds, examination of medieval texts that build worlds from Jewish (Benjamin of Tudela and Petachia of Rattisbon), Muslim (Ibn Jubayr and Ibn Battuta), and Christian perspectives (King Alisaunder, Marco Polo, and Book of John Mandeville); and works by Italo Calvino and China Mieville. Secondary readings may include works by Roxanne Euben, Simon Gaunt, Shirin Khanmohamadi, Sharon Kinoshita, Shayne LeGassie, and Robert Stoneman. Study fulfills English major genre studies, interdisciplinary studies, critical theory (GICT) breadth requirement. Units: 5

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.eachern, C.  Units: 5

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Resourceful Shakespeare: Origins, Analogs, and Offshoots
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of selected plays by William Shakespeare from general perspective of source study, considering both Shakespeare’s use of sources and use of Shakespeare as source. Students read some narrative and dramatic works that Shakespeare used in crafting his own plays to better understand playwright’s transformational strategies. Students gain fresh awareness of plays’ particular idiosyncrasies and more complex sense of Shakespearean imitation and originality. Consideration of those plays as sources, in turn, as they are ripped off/riffed on by modern theatrical, cinematic, and musical derivatives. Although main focus is Shakespeare’s plays, students also acquire sense of their durable importance as cultural properties, resources, and totemic objects of veneration, homage, allusion, and parody. Units: 5

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Longer Poems, and Their Tudor Contexts
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Consideration of Shakespeare’s sonnets and his two narrative poems, Venus and Adonis and Rape of Lucrece, alongside sonnets and narratives by Daniel, Drayton, Sidney, Spenser, Surrey, Wyatt, and others; and forms in which those poems were published and consumed. Some literary, book, and publishing history, all in one package. Students present at least one secondary text on relevant subject, and write 15- to 20-page paper making use of appropriate secondary criticism. Essential preparation: familiarity with early modern English.

FRNCH 112 – Medieval Foundations of European Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Stahuljak, Z.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion/film screenings, two hours. Medieval texts, culture, social structure, and political history as they lay bases of European modernity. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 2C – Religion, Occult, and Science: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in Western Tradition, 1000 to 1600
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Ruiz, T.F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Specific aspects of elite and popular culture in medieval and early modern Europe. Manner in which men and women sought to explain, order, and escape terrors of their lives by embracing transcendental religious experiences and dreaming of apocalypse and witchcraft. Examination of experiences in context of genesis of the state, birth of a new science, and economic and social change. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 19 – Early Modern England Goes to Undergraduate Research Week
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
Class Description: Students undertake short research project that culminates in poster for presentation at Undergraduate Research Week (URW). Students learn about major developments in early modern English history. Students also learn library research skills to help them formulate research question and identify sources with which to pose answer. Students apply to present results of their research at URW, and learn how to design poster. Students practice short oral presentations about their work, to be given at URW. Class meets April 3, 17, May 1, 15, 29.

HIST 105C – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1700 to Present
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 108A – History of North Africa from Islamic Conquest
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of political, social, economic, and religious history of Islamic West (Maghrib) from Muslim conquest in 7th and 8th centuries CE until 1578. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 119C – Medieval Civilization: Mediterranean Heartlands
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of Western Mediterranean Europe, social/economic/cultural within political framework, including its relation with other cultures. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 125D – History of Low Countries
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of aspects of Dutch (and on occasion Belgian) history from medieval period to period after World War II, with emphasis on political and cultural history. Topics include Middle Ages, Dutch Republic in 17th and 18th centuries, Low Countries from 1830 to 1918, Netherlands and Belgium in context of Europe after 1945. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 132 – Topics in European History: Food Revolutions in Europe
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Renton, K.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Integrated introduction to important aspects of European history, with emphasis on specific topic within broad framework. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Food has always been fraught with politics, class, and culture. Examination of revolutions in food supply, and their role in defining European culture and history, between 15th and 18th centuries. Exploration of how Industrial Revolution was famously preceded by Agricultural Revolution in Northern England and Dutch lowlands in late medieval Europe. Examination of revolutionary impacts of Columbian Exchange on new crops to feed rapidly expanding world population. Exploration of how century of famine and war, during little ice age, fed into more famous political and cultural upheavals of 18th century. Approaching larger issues of economic production and technological development from perspective of food, study incorporates issues of climate, environment, and culture in early modern history of Europe.

HIST M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Myers, D.N.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Course Description:(Same as Jewish Studies M184B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of origins and historical development of anti-Semitism. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M50.) (Same as Religion M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 42A – Italy through Ages in English: Saints and Sinners in Early Modern Italy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of issues of cultural hegemony, political and religious freedom, and doctrinal conflict through Italy’s early modern literary and artistic production. Texts may include Dante’s Divine Comedy, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Saint Catherine’s letters, Machiavelli’s The Prince, and Galileo’s scientific writings. Artworks may include those of Raphael and Michelangelo, as well as Bernini’s sculptures. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 98T – Transgressive Voices: Women Writers in Early Modern Italy
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Guarro, A.L.; Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Examination of women writers who used their voices to defy cultural and social constructs intended to limit women’s role in early modern Italy. Analysis of literary and historical examples of female transgression to uncover anxieties surrounding feminine behavior not consistent with societal norms. Letter grading.

ITALIAN 103A – Introduction to Classic Italian Literary and Cultural Studies
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Tognozzi, E.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 100. Taught in Italian. Selected classic works of Italian literature, theater, art, and culture from medieval era to Renaissance and baroque. Emphasis on critical methods and skills for analyzing and interpreting wide range of Italian texts and cultural formations in their historical context and in comparison to contemporary and transnational views. Representative authors may include Saint Francis of Assisi, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Saint Catherine of Siena, Machiavelli, Giotto, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Caravaggio, Gaspara Stampa, Veronica Franco, Ariosto, Tasso, and Galileo. P/NP or letter grading.

JEWISH M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Smith, M.L.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M184B – History of Anti-Semitism
Course Description: (Same as History M184B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of origins and historical development of anti-Semitism. P/NP or letter grading.

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

POL SCI 111B – Early Modern Political Theory
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor: Pagden, A.R.
Course Description: Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Machiavelli, More, Montaigne, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Condorcet, and Kant and questions such as representation, property, autonomy, and political economy. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Slavic M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Asian M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Asian M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60A. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

RELIGN M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M115 – Islam and Other Religions
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M115.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Students gain familiarity with historical cases and modes of interaction between Muslims and non-Muslims in plural societies. Consideration of axis questions such as how does Qur’an reflect religious plurality; how does it situate Islam vis-à-vis its alternatives; what encounters did rapid expansion of Islam bring about in diverse societies; how did Islam and other religions change through debate, war, and exchange of ideas; what roles has political power played in conditioning interreligious interaction; how have conversion and hybridity affected what it means to be Muslim; what is different about interreligious interactions in secular states and societies; and how is past invoked to justify opinions and policies today. Investigation of these questions by conducting microstudies: close readings of sources through theoretical lens. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 134 – Scandinavian Mythology
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Overview of major gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, narratives and adventures that make up lore collectively referred to as Scandinavian, or Norse, myth. Reading and examination of this lore that is chiefly preserved in two collections traditionally called “Poetic (or Elder) Edda” and “Prose (or Younger) Edda.” P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 138 – Vikings
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of history, anthropology, and archaeology of Viking Age society. Readings draw on medieval sagas as well as secondary material, focus on impact of Vikings on northern Europe, and consider ways in which European and Scandinavian societies evolved in response to Viking incursions. P/NP or letter grading.

SLAVC M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Religion M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

SLAVC 90 – Introduction to Slavic Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Koropeckyj, R.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introductory survey of social and cultural institutions of Slavic peoples and their historical background. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Moving Borders: Sex, Migration, and Captivity in Mediterranean World
Lecture: Lec 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 25. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description : Study of interplay of sex, migration, and captivity in 16th- and 17th-century novels, letters, and plays from Mediterranean and transatlantic Iberian empire. Circulation of human beings across different territories of global monarchy fostered transmission of social and philosophical ideas, resulting in increasing hybridization of cultures in contact. Migration was linked to perception of eroticism, as foreigners occupied pre-eminent position in sex markets of global capitals. As elite agents, noblemen, and diplomats traveled to Paris, Rome, or Bologna to receive education or take on diplomatic endeavor, they meddled and interacted with Iberian exiles who were fleeing religious persecution or poverty. Captives, slaves, and freemen shared working spaces, travel routes, and professions. Individuals in movement were eager to re-create their experiences, providing us with materials to reflect upon today’s globalized culture and society. Readings include La Lozana andaluza, Mateo Alemán, Cervantes, María de Zayas, and Montalbán.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Written on Ocean: Ships and Sailors in Colonial Spanish American Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 25. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry.

THEATER 126B – Acting Classical Texts
Studio: Stu 1
Instructor: Hackett, M.J.
Course Description: Studio, six hours. Requisite: course 126A. Advanced study of characterization, approach to verse, scansion, use of embodiment in classic texts. Personalization within heightened reality. Letter grading. Units: 4