Undergraduate Courses

Winter 2019

 

Ancient Near East (AN N EA)
AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

AN N EA M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C
Course Description: (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Units: 5

Arabic
ARABIC M107 – Islam in West
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Sayeed, A.
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M107 and Religion M107.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Acquisition of understanding of basic doctrines and practices of Islam. Survey of history of Islam in West, with focus on U.S. and France. Analysis of issues relevant to growth and development of selected Muslim communities in West. Exposure to diverse expressions of Islam through independent research on Muslim communities and institutions in U.S. Development of strong analytical writing and speaking skills. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Architecture and Urban Design
ARCH&UD 10A – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Meulemans, M.J., Osman, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Art History (ART HIS)
ART HIS C117B – Selected Topics in Medieval Art: Digital Gothic
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in medieval art that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C217B. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Students learn about Gothic architecture by reconstructing it digitally, in 3D, in CAD-based program. No previous knowledge of CAD required, but previous course in art history with architecture helpful. Includes one lecture/discussion and one workshop per week, midterm group presentation, and final group project presentation. Units: 4

ART HIS M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Burke, K.S.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M104D.) (Same as Islamic Studies M111 and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C120 – Selected Topics in Islamic Art: Islamic Art and Architecture before 1250
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Balafrej, L.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C104C.) Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in Islamic art and architecture that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C220A. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Survey of Islamic art and architecture before 1250, from Mediterranean to Middle East to China. Emphasis on both historical and critical approaches. Units: 4

ART HIS 121B – Italian Renaissance Art of 15th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Wilson, B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 106B.) Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of 15th century. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C139C – Inca Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Nair, S.E.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 117F.) Lecture, three hours. Exploration of art, architecture, and urbanism of Incas from their empire’s height in late 15th century to their political and cultural fragmentation during Spanish occupation of Andes (1532 to 1824). Concurrently scheduled with course C239C. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C148B – Art and Material Culture of Early Imperial China, 210 B.C. to A.D. 906
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Von Falkenhausen
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C115E.) Lecture, three hours. Palaces and tombs of early imperial dynasties, impact of Buddhist art (cave temples), rise of new media and technologies. Concurrently scheduled with course C248B. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: The Desert
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 127.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Transdisciplinary exploration of desert as ecosystem, landscape, imagined space, and discourse. Particular focus on Middle East and North Africa. Units: 4

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Art of French Renaissance
Seminar: Sem 2
Instructor: Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 127.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study follows tension between Gothic flamboyance and Florentine Mannerism as mode française transformed, during 16th century, into strict Classicism that would influence European art for centuries to come. Units: 4

Classics
CLASSIC 185 – Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Vine, B.H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Clusters
CLUSTER 30B – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructors: Watins, S.J.; Burdorff, S.F. ; Yokoyama, O.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 30A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration in depth of particular mythological traditions, aspects of storytelling, role of myth in culture, society, and/or art, and contributions of various disciplines to study of myth. Letter grading. Units: 6

Comparative Literature
COM LIT 2AW – Survey of Literature: Antiquity to Middle Ages
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Macfadyen, D.W.
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1A or 4AW. Study of selected texts from antiquity to Middle Ages, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts include works and authors such as “Odyssey,” “Gilgamesh,” Sappho, Greek tragedies, “Aeneid,” Petronius, Beowulf, Marie de France, “Tristan and Iseult,” “1001 Nights,” “Popul Vuh.” Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

COM LIT 4BW – Literature and Writing: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Discussion: Dis 1
Instructor: TA – Macfadyen, D.W.
Course Description: Discussion, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 2BW. Study and discussion of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works and authors such as Chaucer, Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” Cervantes’ “Don Quixote,” Shakespeare, “1001 Nights,” Christine de Pizan, “Popul Vuh,” Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

COM LIT 180 – Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Heal Body, Persuade Mind: Relationship between Erotomania, Melancholy, and Nostalgia in Renaissance Culture
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Ciavolella, M.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of defined periods and approaches in medical humanities, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions in dialogue with other disciplines such as anthropology, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Erotomania, melancholy, and nostalgia share many traits. Throughout history their pathologies have often overlapped, and ambiguity thus created persists today. Medicine, natural philosophy, and literature and philosophy play unique role in this process of distortion and reassignment of meaning. In case of these three ideas, physicians and philosophers have shown indefatigable propensity to explore their boundaries, bring their reciprocal relationships to light and, most importantly, ponder their relevance in terms of physical and mental health of individual. Study focuses on relationship between melancholy and erotomania (amor hereos) in ancient and early modern medical and literary texts, including first text devoted exclusively to study of nostalgia, Johannes Hofer’s Dissertatio Medica de Nostalgia, oder Heimwehe of 1688. Units: 4

COM LIT 180 – Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Mediterranean Medical Traditions: Comparative Perspectives
Seminar: Sem 2
Instructor(s): Touwaide, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of defined periods and approaches in medical humanities, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions in dialogue with other disciplines such as anthropology, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study devoted to major medical systems produced in ancient Mediterranean world: Greek, Arabic, and medieval/Latin. It follows their tradition from origin to Renaissance (including their linkages and intersections through translations); and compares these system(s) not only to reconstruct their genealogy, but also–if not above all–to possibly answer question of what makes medical system Greek, Arabic, or medieval. Non-Mediterranean traditions and systems (mostly Ayurvedic and Chinese) included as appropriate. Ancient texts read in English translation; knowledge of one or more original-source languages is advantage. Units: 4

English
ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Gerber, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 140B – Chaucer: “Troilus and Criseyde” and Selected Minor Works
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Gerber, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of “Troilus and Criseyde” and selected minor works of Chaucer, such as “Book of the Duchess,” “House of Fame,” “Parliament of Fowls,” etc. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Thomas, A.
Class Description: Stories of holy women–hagiographical narratives–offer space for thinking through shifting relationship between church and holy woman, between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and between animals and saints. Study extends from travails of runaway bride Christina of Markyate and visions of Hildegard of Bingen, to feats of Catherine of Siena and travails of Dorothea of Montau and Margery Kempe. Students read writings about and by holy women (and by holy men) alongside relevant materials on dream-visions, narrative strategies, books of rhetorical composition, digests of law, and other institutional documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, travel to enclosure, writing to preaching, and secrets shared and betrayed. Questions for discussion include: what makes these narratives compelling or powerful; and to what extent formal conventions of storytelling help invent powerful female characters in otherwise male-dominated world. Units: 5

ENGL 146 – Medieval Story Cycles and Collections: Auchinleck Manuscript
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of medieval story cycles and story collections as narrative forms. Medieval story cycles engage in complex literary conversations across medieval cultures, periods, genres, and languages, while story collections often stage art of storytelling within narrative frame to invite self-consciousness about powers of literary production itself. Texts may include cycles such as texts gathered as “Matter of Britain,” “Matter of Rome,” or “Matter of France”; also “Mabinogi,” manuscript collections such as Auchinleck manuscript or Exeter book, framed narratives such as “Decameron,” “Canterbury Tales,” “1001 Nights,” and Gower’s “Confessio Amantis,” or collections of exempla, legends, and dicta. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Students read Auchinleck manuscript, book written in 1330s London. It contains fascinating array of texts including saints’ lives, romances, and history writing set amidst shorter pieces of satire, social and political complaint, and religious instruction. Consideration of of medieval book idea as pre-print artifact and as digital phenomenon. Focus on idea of popular: what it meant to write for broad audience in medieval England; how popularity, celebrity, and virtue function in manuscript texts; and how constructions of exotic national, geographic, and religious others was part of that idea. Units: 5

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.
Units: 5

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Major Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to Shakespeare’s plays through survey of some we recognize as his most significant, both historically and contemporarily. Drawing on works from entirety of his career, emphasis on formal and historical properties of Shakespeare’s plays (and stage); and ways these plays engage questions of race, gender, sexuality, and class, religion, philosophy, and politics. How all these questions are embodied–put into bodies–signals how Shakespeare’s dynamic poetry and language have become essential hallmarks for modern and global. Possible texts include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Tempest. Students write term paper. Includes midterm and final examinations. Units: 5

ENGL 153 – Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts–masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari–alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 156 – Devotion and Dissent: Rhetoric of Reformation
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Hedlin, K.S.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Examination of religious thought and practice associated with Reformation and Counter-Reformation enterprises in early modern period and consideration of how various types of writing–poems, prayer books, sermons, historical chronicles, essays, travel narratives, trial records–reflect and assess religious ferment of era. Coverage of either broad historical range such as from Henry VIII’s break with Rome to execution of Charles I or one specific topic such as varieties of martyrdom, art of confession, or conversion narratives. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of religious thought-world of early-modern poets and dramatists including John Donne, George Herbert, Anne Locke, John Milton, Mary Sidney, William Shakespeare, and Edmund Spenser. Students read work of influential Reformation theologians alongside archival materials and canonical literature, investigating how ideas such as forgiveness, penance, freedom, and sin are negotiated and nuanced after Protestant Reformation. Units: 5

ENGL 157 – Translation and Innovation in English Renaissance and Early Modern Period: Ancient Foundations of Modernity: Renaissance Translations from Classics
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Until late 19th century (and to some extent into mid-20th), Greco-Roman texts written between 750 BC and circa 200 AD dominated curriculum from grade school through college, in both England and America. These are works of extraordinary importance (e.g., checks-and-balances structure of American constitution comes from 1st-century BC Greek historian, Polybius), and also of extraordinary beauty, variety, and intelligence. Focuses on English Renaissance translations of classics, because Renaissance was rebirth (re-naissance) of classical learning and literature; and one topic is translation of ancient texts into early modern cultural contexts. General introduction to classical underpinnings of English literature. Readings include selections from Cicero, Hesiod, Homer, Ovid, Pliny, Plutarch, and Xenophon on topics as far-flung as love, duty, sex, science, and empire. Units: 5

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: English Erotic Lyric, 1560 to 1640
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor: Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study of eros, not libido. Foundational discourses of early modern eroticism: Plato’s Symposium; Ovid’s Amores, Ars amatoria, and/or Heroides; and Petrarch’s Rime sparse. Erotic–not pornographic–lyrics of English Renaissance (Sidney’s Astrophel and Stella; Shakespeare’s Sonnets; Donne’s Songs and Sonnets; plus poems by Lodge, Herrick, and Strode). Instructor leads initial meetings. Students responsible for structuring discussion and presentation of English poetry. Each student writes six 1- to 2-page papers, plus 10-page seminar paper. Units: 5

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: London Theater and New King
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Scottish King James VI and I replaced Elizabeth I on English throne in 1603. In their individual ways, both monarchs were interested in theater, and theater was interested in them. How did new political order influence public theaters? Students read some famous plays from 1603-06 in order to formulate hypotheses. Knowledge of Shakespeare’s plays and early modern English are important advantages, as is intellectual confidence to pursue research topics individually. Presentations and one long paper required. Units: 5

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Seminar: Sem 2
Instructor: Jager, E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how ancient Mediterranean epic bequeathed to medieval European romance wide range of character types, narrative patterns, themes, and imagery having to do with war; eros; justice; spirituality; community (city, kingdom, etc.); and personal journey or quest. Books read drawn from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, Chrétien de Troyes’ Lancelot, The Romance of the Rose, The Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur. Includes weekly reports and 10- 12-page research essay, also adapted for presentation at concluding mini-conference. Enrollment by instructor consent. Application instructions available at https://english.ucla.edu/courses-undergraduate/winter-2019/ under Senior English Capstones/Seminars heading. Units: 5

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Metaphysical and Cavalier Poetry
Seminar: Sem 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Focus primarily on canonical figures of earlier 17th-century English lyric poetry (Donne, Herbert, Jonson, and Marvell) alongside less-famous contemporaries such as Carew and Traherne; and on some crucial themes of period: economic inequality, science versus magic, radicals versus conservatives, gender and sexuality, Protestant Reformation, appeal of nature, and fear of death. Through careful reading and open discussion, students attempt to understand not only what these poems say–often no small task–but also their place in configurations of Jacobean and Caroline society. Topics include what tensions and changes in that culture, and in lives of poets, these works might have helped to negotiate; how and why metaphysical and cavalier modes emerged in period of intense theological and political struggle, and what interplay of form, content, and meaning is; what kind of work they did, and how well they did it; and what kinds of work students should do on them now. Units: 5

French
FRNCH 12 – Introduction to Study of French and Francophone Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Carron, J.
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 6. Principles of literary analysis as applied to selected texts in poetry, theater, and prose by French and Francophone writers. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

FRNCH 16 – Society And Self in Early Modern France
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Stefanovska, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Role of religion, politics, and sociability in constructing self and understanding its relation with society in early modern France. Development of students’ critical thought and knowledge of French and European intellectual tradition. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

History
HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa A.D. 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century A.D. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Lydon, G.E.
Course Description: (Same as African American Studies M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 11B – History of China, circa 1000 to 2000
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Goldman, A.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of later history of China–evolution of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from circa 1000 to 2000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, cultural, and economic aspects of early modern regimes and empires and rise of modern China into contemporary era. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 14 – Atlantic World, 1492 to 1830
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Pestana, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Strongly recommended for History majors planning to take more advanced courses in history of any region bordering on Atlantic during period from 1500 to 1900. Exploration of idea of Atlantic world and few of major historical trends that shaped its history, including migration, slavery, imperial conflicts, and revolution. Atlantic history approach avoids national frameworks that assume creation of later national division in order to understand larger, integrated region, one that gave rise to later nation states. In reconsidering how past is studied, highlights key connections, interactions, and circuits that gave rise to modern world. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 187B – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Medieval
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor: Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Italian
ITALIAN 42C – Italy Through the Ages in English: Food and Literature in Italy
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Tognozzi, E.A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Profile of Italian history and culture through analysis of gastronomic and literary texts. Special emphasis on late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Risorgimento. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Jewish Studies
JEWISH 177 – Variable Topics in Jewish Studies: Jews at Origins of Islam
Lecture: Lec 2
Instructor: Yadgar, L
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of Jewish history during early Islamic period, as reflected in Muslim and non-Muslim sources. Readings in Qur’an, biography of prophet Muhammad, Islamic history, and Jewish and Christian writings in order to study Jewish civilization in its contacts with Muhammad’s new religion. All readings in English. General Education (GE) Units: 4

Korean
KOREA 180A – History of Korea through 1259
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Jung-Kim, J.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Examination of evolution of Korean culture and society within context of political and institutional industry. Consideration of both higher and popular culture. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Middle Eastern Studies
M E STD M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Units: 5

Musicology
MUSCLG CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Actvity: Act 1
Instructor(s): Le Guin, E.C.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History CM90T.) (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with course C490T. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

MUSCLG 125B – History of Western Music: Era of Empires and Marketplaces
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Le Guin, E.C.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History 125B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6B (may be taken concurrently), 125A. Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of empires and marketplaces, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques. Letter grading. Units: 5

Philosophy
PHILOS 100B – Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Normore, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended requisite: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

PHILOS 104 – Topics in Islamic Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Crager, A.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three to four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one philosophy course. Development of philosophy within orbit of Islam from beginning of interaction of Islam with ancient philosophy to period of hegemony of Ottoman Empire. Figures examined may vary but usually include many of al-Kindi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, ben Maimon (Maimonides), Ibn Rushd (Averroes), and Suhrawardi. Topics include central issues in metaphysics and epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

PHILOS C110 – Spinoza
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Carriero, J.P.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 21. Study of philosophy of Spinoza. May be concurrently scheduled with course C210, in which case there is weekly discussion meeting, plus fewer readings and shorter papers for undergraduates. Limited to 30 students when concurrently scheduled. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Religion, Study of
RELIGN M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Middle Eastern Studies M50B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Units: 5

Russian
RUSSN 90A – Introduction to Russian Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Pilshchikov, I.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to Russian culture and society from earliest times to 1917. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Scandinavian
SCAND 40 – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40W. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including “Nibelungenlied,” “Volsunga saga,” “Eddas,” and “Beowulf.” Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

SCAND 132A – Elementary Old Norse
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Byock, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Introduction to grammar and pronunciation of Old Norse. Selected readings from sagas and “Prose Edda.” P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

SCAND 138 – Vikings
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of history, anthropology, and archaeology of Viking Age society. Readings draw on medieval sagas as well as secondary material, focus on impact of Vikings on northern Europe, and consider ways in which European and Scandinavian societies evolved in response to Viking incursions. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

SCAND C171 – Introduction to Scandinavian Folklore
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Tangherlini, T.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Introduction to fairy tales and legends of Scandinavian tradition as well as to interpretive methodologies that strive to answer question why do people tell stories that they tell? Concurrently scheduled with course C271. Letter grading. Units: 4

Spanish
SPAN 42 – Iberian Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Required of majors. Lectures taught in English; discussion sections taught in either Spanish or English. Highlights of civilization of Spain, with emphasis on artistic, economic, social, and historical development as background for upper-division courses. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Love and Friendship in 16th- and 17th-Century Spain
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor: Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 25. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: What happens to body and soul when person falls in love or finds friendship; and what good or bad does that do to individuals and society? Students read novels, theatrical plays, poems, and even fragments of medical and psychological treatises that present answers that 16th- and 17th-century individuals gave to questions like these. For some, love was terminal illness; for others, only path to happiness. Philosophers hailed friendship as way to find another self, with whom alone sincerity was allowed, in world that forced individuals to mask every feeling in order to associate with others. Unfortunately–much like today–love and friendship took place under constraints of gender, class, and race; they helped to create social ties as much as they operated through exclusion, as they do now. Readings include Cervantes, Guillén de Castro, Lope de Vega, and María de Zayas. Units: 4