Undergraduate Courses

Winter 2020

AN N EA 12W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

AN N EA M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Ancient Near East (AN N EA) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Course Description: (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

Arabic
ARABIC 250 – Seminar: Premodern Arabic Literature
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Readings in Arabic texts from variety of periods and genres, along with appropriate secondary literature. Topics include pre-Islamic poetry and oratory, Qur’an, Umayyad and Abbasid poetry and literary prose, Hadith and Fiqh, historiography, biography, geography, medicine, mathematics, theology, asceticism, and mysticism. May be repeated for maximum of 24 units. S/U or letter grading.

ART HIS C115B – Early Medieval Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Gerstel, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 21. Art and architecture of Western Europe from Migration period until AD 1000. Concurrently scheduled with course C215B. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s):Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M111 and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Maya Art and Gender
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of how gender has played key role in formation and expression of arts in ancient Americas, in particular that of Maya. Consideration of theoretical frameworks drawn from women’s and gender studies. Exploration of ways in which art historians, archaeologists, and historians have looked at roles women played in indigenous societies, in particular that of arts.

CLASSIC 185 – Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vine, B.H.; Lunardi, V.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading.

CLUSTER 21B – History of Modern Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Porter, T.M.; Alexander, A.; Sissa, G.; Stahuljak, Z.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 21B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 21A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Introduction to key issues in humanities and social sciences through reading of prominent social theories of past four centuries. Consideration of writers from Rousseau and Wollstonecraft to Foucault and Beauvoir in historical context and from perspectives of academic specialties for which their work is fundamental. Letter grading.

CLUSTER 30B – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s); Burdorff, S.F.; Wendrich, W.Z.; Tangherlini, T.R.; Yokoyama, O.T.; Goldberg, S.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 30A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration in depth of particular mythological traditions, aspects of storytelling, role of myth in culture, society, and/or art, and contributions of various disciplines to study of myth. Letter grading.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 141C – Topics in Old English: Beowulf
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Weaver, E.M.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 141B. Intensive study of Old English literature in original language. Texts and topics may include Beowulf, Vercelli Book, books of monsters, medical writing, etc. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Designed for students who have completed course 141B. Although it only survives in one half-burned copy, Beowulf is today both early medieval poem that begins countless British literature surveys, and subject of blockbuster movie and novel adaptations. Yet, even as poem invites one into its mead halls and dragon hoards relatively easily, it remains impossible to say exactly when or by whom it was written; or what its earliest audiences may have thought of it. Students translate key scenes from original Old English, while reading whole through range of translations and critical lenses. One guiding theme is intimacy: How close can one get to poem (and language) from 1,000 years ago? And what ways of reading can help illuminate it? Study serves as laboratory for different interpretive approaches, from manuscript analysis to theoretical frameworks. Students also pursue original research project on poem and its readers, medieval and modern.

ENGL 142R – Later Medieval Literature: Research Component: Women’s Work and Medieval Slavery
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). Substantial research component included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: In 2019, UCLA Library acquired deed–dated 1401–for sale of slave woman, Magdalena, from one woman to another in Barcelona. Identified as neophyte from Tartary, Magdalena’s story raises many literary (and historical) questions about past. Focus on this primary document, and how to generate and pursue research topics that radiate out from it. Students work hands-on with manuscript in YRL Special Collections. Students learn how to develop historical research questions, conduct research, and begin to answer those questions in substantial literary critical papers. Students read clusters of primary medieval texts that focus on slavery in medieval Europe, representations of domesticity and gendered medieval labor, medieval romance depictions of Tartar east, and writing by medieval women. Clusters of texts used to ground exploration of medieval past. Study also uses new UC Annotate tool to ask and answer questions collaboratively. Students write two papers (5-6 pages and 20 pages) and make presentation.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Stories of holy women–hagiographical narratives–offer space for thinking through shifting relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and animals and saints. Study extends from travails of runaway bride Christina of Markyate and visions of Hildegard of Bingen, to feats of Catherine of Siena and travails of Dorothea of Montau and Margery Kempe. Students read writings about and by holy women (and by holy men) alongside relevant materials on dream-visions, narrative strategies, rhetorical composition, law digests, and other institutional documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, travel to enclosure, writing to preaching, and secrets shared and betrayed. Questions discussed include what makes these narratives compelling or powerful, and to what extent formal conventions of storytelling help invent powerful female characters in otherwise male-dominated world.

ENGL 146 – Medieval Story Cycles and Collections: Medieval Outlaws, Rebels, and Rioters
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of medieval story cycles and story collections as narrative forms. Medieval story cycles engage in complex literary conversations across medieval cultures, periods, genres, and languages, while story collections often stage art of storytelling within narrative frame to invite self-consciousness about powers of literary production itself. Texts may include cycles such as texts gathered as “Matter of Britain,” “Matter of Rome,” or “Matter of France”; also “Mabinogi,” manuscript collections such as Auchinleck manuscript or Exeter book, framed narratives such as “Decameron,” “Canterbury Tales,” “1001 Nights,” and Gower’s “Confessio Amantis,” or collections of exempla, legends, and dicta. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Everyone knows Robin Hood. Or, more accurately, everyone knows some later version of Robin Hood, whether 1991 film starring Kevin Costner or Disney’s 1973 animated film. Exploration of how Robin Hood was invented in later medieval England. Investigation of medieval stories that introduced number of outlaws, from outlawry’s most famous son, Robin Hood, to lesser-known rebels such as Fouke fitz Waryn and Hereward the Wake. Consideration of what it means to be out of law. Exploration of various ways in which outlaws behaved and functioned as social, political, and economic rebels in English literature. Students read series of medieval outlaw tales and Robin Hood texts, then follow tradition through early modern ballads and broadsides, and possibly into 19th-century stories and novels.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespeare’s Major Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to Shakespeare’s plays through survey of some recognized as his most significant, both historically and contemporarily. Drawing on works from entirety of his career, emphasis on formal and historical properties of Shakespeare’s plays (and stage); and ways these plays engage questions of race, gender, sexuality, class, religion, philosophy, and politics. How these questions are embodied–put into bodies–signals how Shakespeare’s dynamic poetry and language have become essential hallmarks for modern and global. Possible texts include A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, Othello, The Merchant of Venice, and The Tempest. Students write term paper. Includes midterm and final examinations.

ENGL 157 – Translation and Innovation in English Renaissance and Early Modern Period
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 181A – Topics in Genre Studies: Early English Verse Structure
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Stockwell, D.M.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87. Consult Schedule of Classes for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Survey of changing modes/principles of poetic composition in English, examined in relation to language history. General introduction to scansion using 21st-century (non-free) verse, and similarities and differences between verse and prose. Overview of pronunciation and stress patterns of Old (7th-11th century), Middle (11-15th century) and later English. Core study addresses metrical structure of Beowulf and other Old English alliterative compositions, possibly including Ælfric’s rhythmical prose, alliterative innovations and constraints in Middle English, (dis)continuity of alliteration in modern writing and culture, emergence and evolution of rhyme and syllable-counting in English prior to Chaucer, and iambic pentameter: metrical rules and violations in Chaucer, Milton, Shakespeare. Solid analytical grounding in general principles of poetic meter, speech rhythm, semiotics of verse structure, and differences between prose and verse should lead to deeper understanding and appreciation of constantly changing interplay between language and literature.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Jager, E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how ancient Mediterranean epic bequeathed to medieval European romance wide range of character types, narrative patterns, themes, and imagery having to do with war, eros, justice, spirituality, community (city, kingdom, etc.), and personal journey or quest. Assigned books vary but typically drawn from Augustine’s Confessions, Chrétien de Troyes’ Lancelot, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur, and Virgil’s Aeneid; Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Lais of Marie de France, The Romance of the Rose, and The Song of Roland. Assignments include weekly reports and one 10- to 12-page research essay, also adapted for presentation at mini-conference. Enrollment by instructor consent; see Senior/Capstone Seminars at https://english.ucla.edu/courses-undergraduate/winter-2020/.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: London Theater and New King
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Scottish King James VI and I replaced Elizabeth I on English throne in 1603. In their individual ways, both monarchs were interested in theater, and theater was interested in them. How did new political order influence public theaters? Students read some famous plays from 1603-06 in order to formulate hypotheses. Knowledge of Shakespeare’s plays and early modern English are important advantages, as is intellectual confidence to pursue research topics individually. Presentations and one long paper required.

FRNCH 16 – Society And Self in Early Modern France
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Stefanovska, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Role of religion, politics, and sociability in constructing self and understanding its relation with society in early modern France. Development of students’ critical thought and knowledge of French and European intellectual tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
This is a multiple-listed class: African American Studies (AF AMER) M10A – History of Africa to 1800; History (HIST) M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Course Description: (Same as African American Studies M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 11A – History of China: To 1000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Von Glahn, R.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of early history of China–genesis of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from antiquity to 1000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, and economic aspects of early and middle empires. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 21 – World History, circa 600 to 1760
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Outline of world history from rise of Islam to start of Industrial Revolution, structured around a broad chronological narrative of salient developments. Use of thematic and comparative approaches, with certain recurring themes and institutions that modulate from culture to culture. Reading of variety of contemporary accounts to look at way people perceived cultures outside their own. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Inquisition: Power and Faith in Middle Ages
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Iafolla, R.J.; Hudson, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: In early 13th century, Pope Gregory IX ordered inquisition into “heretical depravity” to combat outbreak of religious dissent in southern France. At first, it simply meant using new procedures for conducting investigations and trials. But scope of inquisition quickly expanded until it became method for identifying, prosecuting, and punishing many forms of deviance. Study covers origins and nature of inquisition; experiences of accused heretics on trial; expansion of inquisition to new targets like Jews, holy women, and saints; inquisitorial methods of control over individuals and communities; and Spanish Inquisition and its legacy. Students complete short assignments to develop writing and research skills, and final paper. Students develop historical questions, identify relevant sources, and deploy evidence in support of argument.

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Rich and Poor in Middle Ages
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Comuzzi, E.A.; Hudson, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of wealth inequality in medieval European society. Using variety of primary and secondary source readings, exploration of subjects such as lives of rich (nobles and kings), lives of poor (peasants and beggars), lives of those in middle (artisans and merchants), income inequality, social mobility, common means of making money, charity, and prevailing religious attitudes towards poverty and profit in Europe during middle ages.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Philosophy and Utopia in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.

Class Description: Introduction to discipline of intellectual history. Detailed introduction on how to practice it, to make sense of key text in early modern political philosophy: Thomas More’s Utopia (1516). Includes readings about intellectual history in general; and early modern political, moral, and social theory in particular. Focus on exploration of imaginative and intellectual world of Thomas More’s famous text, title of which pioneered new genre of European political writing. Endlessly enigmatic, profoundly imaginative, and often very funny indeed, More’s text also remains intensely controversial. Study tries to explain why.

HIST 97J – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in African History: Timbuktu Chronicles and other African Sources
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Africa, cradle of humanity and civilization, remains one of most misunderstood and understudied continents. One challenge historians of Africa face is unevenness of primary sources. African historical research therefore requires multidisciplinary approach, that draws heavily on methods of anthropologists and archaeologists. Students learn about methods and sources for reconstructing African past. Analysis of varied primary sources including oral tradition of Sundiata the Lion King of Mali; travelog of 13th-century Muslim globetrotter; and earliest records written by Africans in Arabic languages, namely so-called Timbuktu Chronicles. Attention given to European sources, and sources by Africans in European languages. Discussion of how historians handle these multimedia sources. Students weigh pros and cons of relying on internal and external evidence for writing Africa’s past.

HIST 107A – Armenian History: Armenia in Ancient and Medieval Times, 2nd Millennium BC to AD 11th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 107B – Armenian History: Armenia from Cilician Kingdom through Periods of Foreign Domination and National Stirrings, 11th to 19th Centuries
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 119A – Medieval Europe, 400 to 1000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Basic introduction to Western Europe from Latin antiquity to age of discovery, with emphasis on medieval use of Greco-Roman antiquity, history of manuscript book, and growth of literacy. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 122B – Cultural and Intellectual History of Modern Europe, 16th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Tutino, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Climates of taste and climates of opinion. Educational, moral, and religious attitudes; art, thought, and manners of time in historical context. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 130 – History of European Political Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to principal themes in history of European political thought from classical antiquity to close of early modern period. Study of outstanding contributions to history of social, political, and moral philosophy in texts of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, More, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Reconstruction of broad intellectual and ideological contexts from which their work emerged to help students make sense of works of political philosophy in their relevant historical setting and to know something about Athenian democracy and its critics, Roman republic and its empire, Renaissance, early modern European civil wars, American and French Revolutions, and Enlightenment. Focus on emergence of some crucial concepts during this period–ideas about state, self, rights, sovereignty, liberty, private property, and more–that define way we think about politics and society in modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M110.) (Same as Religion M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119C and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST 151 – Islamic Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Islamics 151.) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Recommended requisite: course M110. Based on original writings of major Islamic thinkers in English translation, provides balanced picture of enormous ideological variety found in contemporary Muslim world. Examination of representative writings from wide spectrum of modern Islamic intellectuals and writers. Letter grading.

ITALIAN 42A – Italy through Ages in English: Saints and Sinners in Early Modern Italy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of issues of cultural hegemony, political and religious freedom, and doctrinal conflict through Italy’s early modern literary and artistic production. Texts may include Dante’s Divine Comedy, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Saint Catherine’s letters, Machiavelli’s The Prince, and Galileo’s scientific writings. Artworks may include those of Raphael and Michelangelo, as well as Bernini’s sculptures. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 140 – Italian Novella from Boccaccio to Basile in Translation
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ciavolella, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Analysis of development of Italian novella in its structure, historical context, and folk material. Special emphasis on how Italian novella influenced other European literatures. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 216D – Studies in the Renaissance: Renaissance Theater
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ciavolella, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

M E STD M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Ancient Near East (AN N EA) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam;
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

M E STD M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class: Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119C and Islamic Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

PHILOS 100B – Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Normore, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended requisite: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M109.) (Same as Islamic Studies M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class: Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West; Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Slavic M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Ancient Near East (AN N EA) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Middle Eastern Studies M50B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

SCAND 138 – Vikings
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of history, anthropology, and archaeology of Viking Age society. Readings draw on medieval sagas as well as secondary material, focus on impact of Vikings on northern Europe, and consider ways in which European and Scandinavian societies evolved in response to Viking incursions. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND C171 – Introduction to Scandinavian Folklore
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Tangherlini, T.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Introduction to fairy tales and legends of Scandinavian tradition as well as to interpretive methodologies that strive to answer question why do people tell stories that they tell? Concurrently scheduled with course C271. Letter grading.

SLAVC M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class: Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West; Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Religion M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity–Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Conquest and Colonization of Latin America: Character Types and Literary Representations
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: First Europeans to arrive on American continent were group of conquerors, travelers, soldiers, missionaries, sailors, and wanderers who moved throughout New World as it was interpreted by those who just arrived, and as unknown world by those still living in Old one. Following different character types–sailor, wanderer, conqueror, castaway, woman, captive, traitor, etc.–study of different literary representations of Latin American colonial world.