Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2021

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Art History

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units:5
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 22 – Renaissance and Baroque Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Renaissance and baroque art. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Lecture: Lec 3
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance. P/NP or letter grading.

Chinese

CHIN 110A – Introduction to Classical Chinese
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Duthie, N.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 3 or Chinese placement test. Course 110A is enforced requisite to 110B, which is enforced requisite to 110C. Grammar and readings in selected premodern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN C150A – Lyrical Traditions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Mai, H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Readings in English translation of poetic and critical writings of traditional China, with emphasis on development of subjectivity and modes of address. Concurrently scheduled with course C250A. P/NP or letter grading.

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 19 – Silence of Lamb: Animals as Persons in Literature, Law, and Sciences
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
Class Description: Study of centrality of animal to articulation of human, and resultant silencing of numerous nonhuman species signified by former term. Whether as pet or pest, object dissected in lab or food carved at table, symbol or referent, nonhuman animal looms large though often silent, but still shaping what it means to be human. In living amid, researching, collaborating with, consuming, and above all thinking through nonhuman animal, humans construct who or what they are and how they differ from those deemed to be other than themselves. Exploration of human-animal interactions or intersections across diverse cultures, periods, and disciplines. Students read literary and legal excerpts, and some of latest scientific research on human-animal dichotomy/dualism: research that invites rethinking property status of nonhuman animals. Includes field trip to farm sanctuary.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 142 – Later Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Category of holy life offers space for thinking through relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and rebellion and conformity. Ranging from lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, focus on ways in which holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged norms of medieval church by rebelling against–and at same time conforming to–them. Students close-read lives (Vitae) of such women (and some holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, and from travel to enclosure. Questions discussed include why holy women came to play increasingly dominant roles in Middle Ages; and how they used their virginity or chastity to find agency within ecclesiastical structures designed to control their lives.

ENGL 146 – Medieval Story Cycles and Collections: Framing Premodern Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of medieval story cycles and story collections as narrative forms. Medieval story cycles engage in complex literary conversations across medieval cultures, periods, genres, and languages, while story collections often stage art of storytelling within narrative frame to invite self-consciousness about powers of literary production itself. Texts may include cycles such as texts gathered as “Matter of Britain,” “Matter of Rome,” or “Matter of France”; also “Mabinogi,” manuscript collections such as Auchinleck manuscript or Exeter book, framed narratives such as “Decameron,” “Canterbury Tales,” “One Thousand and One Nights,” and Gower’s “Confessio Amantis,” or collections of exempla, legends, and dicta. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Framed story collections put narrators in same rooms as their imagined audiences, making them visible and vulnerable, and thus highlighting tactics and self-interests of storytelling itself. Through multi-story narrative architectures, they can meditate on social and aesthetic power of underrepresented voices while inviting reader to envision social change, or hold line against it. Drawing on narrative theory, feminism, and cultural studies, exploration of four premodern story collections that put gender at issue: Petrus Alfonsi’s Disciplina Clericalis, Christine de Pizan’s Book of the City of Ladies, One Thousand and One Nights, and Doncella Teodor. Consideratuon of South Asian, Persian, and Mediterranean story collections that fed these works, including Boccaccio’s Decameron, The Book of Sindbad, and Vikram aur Betaal. Includes weekly response papers/forum posts, and two short papers or one longer paper (or one project with class presentation).

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 153 – Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances: Staging Race in Early Modern England
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wagner, A.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts–masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari–alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how early modern dramatists staged race. Readings = include masques and plays by Richard Brome, Thomas Dekker, Ben Jonson, George Peele, William Shakespeare, and John Webster. Students also read excerpts from early modern ethnographies, mythologies, and travel narratives to understand central role of theater in constructing racial hierarchies in 16th- and 17th-century England. Examinations of race in early modern period pay close attention to representations of gender, disability, class, and empire.

ENGL 157 – Translation and Innovation in English Renaissance and Early Modern Period: Ancient Foundations of Modernity: Renaissance Translations from Classics
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Into 20th century, Greco-Roman texts written between 750 BC and circa 200 AD dominated curriculum from grade school through college, in both England and America. These are works of extraordinary importance (e.g., checks-and-balances structure of American constitution comes from first-century BC Greek historian Polybius); and of extraordinary beauty, variety, and intelligence. Focus on English Renaissance translations of classics, because Renaissance was rebirth (re-naissance) of classical learning and literature; and one topic is Tudor-Stuart contexts of these translations. General introduction to classical foundations on which virtually all English and American literature rest. Readings include selections from Cicero, Homer, Ovid, Pliny, Plutarch, and Xenophon on topics as far-flung as love, duty, sex, science, and empire. Includes weekly short paper and final project.

History

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Phillips, D.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 3A – History of Science: Renaissance to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of beginnings of physical sciences involving transformation from Aristotelian to Newtonian cosmology, mechanization of natural world, rise of experimental science, and origin of scientific societies. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 9D – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to history of Muslim world from advent of Islam to present day. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 122B – Cultural and Intellectual History of Modern Europe, 16th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Tutino, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Climates of taste and climates of opinion. Educational, moral, and religious attitudes; art, thought, and manners of time in historical context. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy,
Russian (RUSSN) M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Course Description: (Same as Russian M118.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Course Description: (Same as Religion M174D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical introduction to Muslim communities of what eventually became nations of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include social, political, religious, and cultural history. P/NP or letter grading.

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M110.) (Same as Religion M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST 151 – Islamic Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Islamics 151.) Lecture, 90 minutes; discussion, 90 minutes. Recommended requisite: course M110. Based on original writings of major Islamic thinkers in English translation, provides balanced picture of enormous ideological variety found in contemporary Muslim world. Examination of representative writings from wide spectrum of modern Islamic intellectuals and writers. Letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN 110 – Dante in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Close study of one of world’s greatest literary geniuses, particularly of his masterpiece, “Divine Comedy,” the archetypal medieval journey through the afterworld. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 116A – Italian Renaissance: Renewal of Art and Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of Quattrocento and its representatives in arts and humanistic thought (i.e., Mantegna, Botticelli, Pico, Valla, and Ficino). P/NP or letter grading.

Japanese

JAPAN 50 – Japanese Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Duthie, T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Survey of development of Japanese culture and its relationship to Asiatic mainland. P/NP or letter grading.

Korean

KOREA CM160 – Korean Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Buswell, R.E.
Course Description: (Same as Religion M161C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in Korea, interactions between indigenous Korean culture and Sinitic traditions of Buddhism, Korean syntheses of imported Buddhist theological systems and meditative techniques, and independent Son (Zen) schools of Korea. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading.

Musicology

MUSCLG 125A – History of Western Music: Era of Church and Patron
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Upton, E.R.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History 125A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6A (may be taken concurrently). Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of church and court patronage, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques. Letter grading.

Religion

RELIGN M20 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M20 – Introduction to Islam, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M20 – Introduction to Islam
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M109.) (Same as Islamic Studies M20.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN M161C – Korean Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Buswell, R.E.
This is a multiple-listed class: Korean (KOREA) CM160 – Korean Buddhism, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M161C – Korean Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Korean CM160.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in Korea, interactions between indigenous Korean culture and Sinitic traditions of Buddhism, Korean syntheses of imported Buddhist theological systems and meditative techniques, and independent Son (Zen) schools of Korea. Letter grading.

RELIGN M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Course Description: (Same as History M174D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical introduction to Muslim communities of what eventually became nations of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include social, political, religious, and cultural history. P/NP or letter grading.

Russian

RUSSN M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
This is a multiple-listed class: History (HIST) M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy, Russian (RUSSN) M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Course Description: (Same as History M127A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian

SCAND 40 – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40W. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including Nibelungenlied, Völsunga Saga, Eddas, and Beowulf. Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 134 – Scandinavian Mythology
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Overview of major gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, narratives and adventures that make up lore collectively referred to as Scandinavian, or Norse, myth. Reading and examination of this lore that is chiefly preserved in two collections traditionally called “Poetic (or Elder) Edda” and “Prose (or Younger) Edda.” P/NP or letter grading.

Spanish

SPAN 11A – Catalan Language and Culture I
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, six hours. Preparation: at least two years of college-level Spanish, Portuguese, or another Romance language other than Catalan. Introduction to oral and written Catalan language. Part I of two-term accelerated language sequence equivalent to three terms of traditional pattern and designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 42 – Iberian Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Required of majors. Lectures taught in English; discussion sections taught in either Spanish or English. Highlights of civilization of Spain, with emphasis on artistic, economic, social, and historical development as background for upper-division courses. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include Convivencia (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Performing One’s Life in 17th-Century Transatlantic Hispanic World
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Performance shaped existence of 17th-century individuals. Men and women–regardless of class and race–gathered at theater, eager to see and to be seen. At end of day, human hearts and minds supplied curious with most genuine and mysterious spectacle to see, asking how others really are inside; what do people hide when they show up in public. Reading of plays by Calderón, Lope de Vega, Ruiz de Alarcón, Sor Juana, and others. Plays guide students through world in which suspicion that everyone in street was performing role was only too real. Individuals feared that everyone else was concealing their true selves. It became necessary to develop tools to see into other’s minds, while keeping one’s own under lock. Only smartest realized that even to spy on others was often easier than to look inside oneself–because no one wants to incur self-hate. Taught in Spanish.