Undergraduate Courses

Spring 2021

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Schniedewind, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Archaeology

ARCHEOL M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119D, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Art History

ART HIS 27 – Art and Architecture of Ancient Americas
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. Introduction to art, architecture, and urbanism of Americas (North to South) from earliest settlement until AD 1450. Analysis of variety of media within their historical and cultural context. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C115F – Medieval Paris
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 21. Material culture, art, architecture, and history of city of Paris to circa 1500. Concurrently schedule with course C215F. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 119B – Eastern Islamic Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers through Afghanistan and parts of central Asia; Ottoman Empire. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 121B – Italian Renaissance Art of 15th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of 15th century. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Albrecht Dürer: Painting, Graphic Arts, and Science
Seminar: Sem 3
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study covers Renaissance painter Albrecht Dürer’s contributions to history of art, design, graphic arts, media production, and physical sciences through his paintings, prints, sketchbooks, journals, and treatises.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Architecture and Feminism
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of complex ways in which architecture design, construction, and history have intersected with female lives, in ways that were both empowering and oppressive. Case studies drawn from across time and space.

Chinese

CHIN 110C – Introduction to Classical Chinese
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Mai, H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 110B. Grammar and readings in selected premodern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN C150A – Lyrical Traditions
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Mai, H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Readings in English translation of poetic and critical writings of traditional China, with emphasis on development of subjectivity and modes of address. Concurrently scheduled with course C250A. P/NP or letter grading.

Classics

CLASSIC M121 – Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Sissa, G.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Classics (CLASSIC) M121 – Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
Political Science (POL SCI) M111A – Ancient and Medieval Political Theory
Course Description: (Same as Political Science M111A.) Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, St. Augustine, Aquinas, Machiavelli, and More and questions such as forms of government, citizenship, justice, happiness, rhetoric, religion, emotion. P/NP or letter grading.

CLASSIC 185 – Origins and Nature of English Vocabulary
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Vine, B.H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Origins and nature of English vocabulary, from Proto-Indo-European prehistory to current slang. Topics include Greek and Latin component in English (including technical terminology), alphabet and English spelling, semantic change and word formation, vocabulary in literature and film. P/NP or letter grading.

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality: Renaissance Woman and Her Daughters
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
This is a multiple-listed class:
English (ENGL) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Gender Studies (GENDER) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies (LGBTQS) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Course Description:(Same as Gender Studies M107B and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M107B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Examination of literary and cultural production through lens of gender and sexuality. Depending on instructor, emphasis may be historical, regional, national, comparative, or thematic and include other intersectional vectors of identity and representation such as race and ethnicity. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Genesis and development of female character type from contradiction: namely, how figure of virtuous-yet-fallen, fallen-yet-graced, active-yet-passive, married-yet-chaste female protagonist of British literature is conceived in and of English Reformation, and its tensions between essential equality of all souls before God and political necessity of female subordination. Exploration of how Renaissance woman emerges in homiletic literature of 16th century (theology, conduct books, history), and is shaped into being in heroines of Milton, Shakespeare, Sidney, and Spenser. Examination of ways in which legacy of this genesis persists in novels of Austen, Brontë, and Richardson. Concerns include shifting notions of literary character; demands of form upon it (poem, play, novel); difference of material production (from boy actors to female audiences of novels); influences of political and religious culture (female queens to angel in house); and ways in which writers read their predecessors (literary influence and formal innovation).

ENGL 118B – Literature and Other Arts: Orpheus and Eurydice Redux: Multimedia Avatars of Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Gallagher, L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Investigation of relationship of literature to one or more other arts, including music (opera, musical theater, popular music, jazz), painting, photography, other visual arts, sculpture and other plastic arts, performance art, dance, architecture. Topics vary and may include not only English literature but foreign literature in translation. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of persistent power of Orpheus legend to expose fault lines in social and political life. Course materials range from Greek and Roman antiquity to present day, and cover several genres and aesthetic forms (drama, fiction, film, musical theater, opera, poetry, and visual art objects). Critical perspectives from philosophies of myth target mythic avatars’ eloquence as coded witnesses to several species of harm: domestic abuse, forced labor and incarceration, constrictive gender expressions, and micro-betrayals of intimacy and safety. Avatars’ diagnostic power also mobilizes incentives to corrective and reparative action in face of foreclosed expectations of how stories of loss and displacement may turn out. Materials include Alfred Hitchcock’s celebrated noirish film Vertigo and French novel that inspired it, Jean Cocteau’s surrealist-inflected film Orpheus; and Anaïs Mitchell’s folk opera musical Hadestown. Student research outcomes include option of selecting and curating materials for digital project.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 142 – Later Medieval Literature: Rebels, Heretics, Plague: Odd Gaps of Late Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Late medieval England was time of massive death to repeated ravages of the Black Plague, rebellion, revolution, and (small number of) heretics burned at stake. Reading springtime world of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, however, one would be hard-pressed to know that medieval England was riven with divisions, and struggling with crises of class, gender, and religious identities. What, then, are histories that Medieval English literature creates and obscures? Includes Middle English quiz, creative translation project and accompanying short two-page essay, and two papers: one four- to five-page paper and final 10- to 12-page paper.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 153 – Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances: True Crime and Domestic Drama in Early Modern England
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Bonnici, K.B.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts–masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari–alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of early modern dramatizations of notorious murders of the day, and plays concerned with lives of ordinary people (sometimes same). Plays include Arden of Faversham, A Woman Killed with Kindness, and The Witch of Edmonton, along with crime pamphlets and ballads.

ENGL 157 – Ancient Foundations of Modernity: Renaissance Translations from Classics
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Until late 19th century (and to some extent into mid-20th), Greco-Roman texts written between 750 BC and circa 200 AD dominated curriculum from grade school through college, in both England and America. These are works of extraordinary importance (e.g., checks-and-balances structure of American constitution comes from first-century BC Greek historian Polybius), and of extraordinary beauty, variety, and intelligence. Focuses on English Renaissance translations of classics, because Renaissance was rebirth (re-naissance) of classical learning and literature; and one topic is translation of ancient texts into early modern cultural contexts. General introduction to classical underpinnings of English literature. Readings include selections from Cicero, Hesiod, Homer, Ovid, Pliny, Plutarch, and Xenophon on topics as far-flung as love, duty, sex, science, and empire.

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: Shakespeare’s Two Tetralogies
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult Schedule of Classes for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study of Shakespeare’s two sequences of history plays in chronological order. Particular attention to representation of political process, role of language in construction of power, modes of historical causality, and role of character in construction of historical representation.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Dreams, Visions, and Apparitions in Medieval Literature
Seminar: Sem 3
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Dreams, visions, and apparitions are constitutive of medieval literature writ large. They are ubiquitous in hagiographical writings, academic commentaries, theological treatises, and poetic compositions. They often inaugurate treatises and tales, raise expectations, and fulfill or even frustrate audience expectations. Wherever they occur, they offer space for thinking through relations between real and visionary; historical and fantastic; empirically verifiable and spiritually valuable; medieval discourses or disciplines including rhetoric, history, law, and theology. Exploration of dreams, visions, and apparitions in texts ranging from lives of holy women and men (such as semi-autobiographical Passion of St. Perpetua and Felicity, anonymous biography of bride Christina of Markyate, and Eadmer’s Life of Anselm) to great poetic works of Chaucer (Parlement of Foules, House of Fame, Canterbury Tales); Gower (Confessio amantis); and Langland (Piers Plowman). Focus on ways that writers handle dream experiences for their content and form.

French

FRNCH 112 – Medieval Foundations of European Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Stahuljak, Z.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion/film screenings, two hours. Medieval texts, culture, social structure, and political history as they lay bases of European modernity. P/NP or letter grading.

FRNCH 116 – Studies in Renaissance French Culture and Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Burns, R.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Taught in French. Study of Renaissance French culture and literature, including la Pléiade and 16th-century poetry, linguistic and poetic revolution, novel and early prose, and late French humanism. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Equity or the Desire for Justice in Early Modern France
Equity has come to the fore in recent years as a key concept in campaigns for social justice. But what is equity and where does the term come from? This course will explore the classical roots of the concept of equity and its multifaceted revival in early modern French literature and thought. Students will be invited to think critically about the role of early modern approaches to equity in the shaping of present-day ethical and political discourses. Authors will include Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Ronsard, Montaigne, Bodin, and Pascal. All works will be read and discussed in English, though attention to the French originals will be encouraged wherever possible. P/NP or letter grading.

Gender Studies

GENDER M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality: Renaissance Woman and Her Daughters
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
This is a multiple-listed class:
English (ENGL) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Gender Studies (GENDER) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies (LGBTQS) M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality
Course Description: (Same as English M107B and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M107B.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Examination of literary and cultural production through lens of gender and sexuality. Depending on instructor, emphasis may be historical, regional, national, comparative, or thematic and include other intersectional vectors of identity and representation such as race and ethnicity. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Genesis and development of female character type from contradiction: namely, how figure of virtuous-yet-fallen, fallen-yet-graced, active-yet-passive, married-yet-chaste female protagonist of British literature is conceived in and of English Reformation, and its tensions between essential equality of all souls before God and political necessity of female subordination. Exploration of how Renaissance woman emerges in homiletic literature of 16th century (theology, conduct books, history), and is shaped into being in heroines of Milton, Shakespeare, Sidney, and Spenser. Examination of ways in which legacy of this genesis persists in novels of Austen, Brontë, and Richardson. Concerns include shifting notions of literary character; demands of form upon it (poem, play, novel); difference of material production (from boy actors to female audiences of novels); influences of political and religious culture (female queens to angel in house); and ways in which writers read their predecessors (literary influence and formal innovation).

GENDER M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Cheung, R.Y.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Gender Studies (GENDER) M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
History (HIST) M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
Course Description: (Same as History M170C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics include women and family, women in Confucian ideology, women in literati culture, feminist movement, and women and communist revolution. P/NP or letter grading.

History

HIST 14 – Atlantic World, 1492 to 1830
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Pestana, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Strongly recommended for History majors planning to take more advanced courses in history of any region bordering on Atlantic during period from 1500 to 1900. Exploration of idea of Atlantic world and few of major historical trends that shaped its history, including migration, slavery, imperial conflicts, and revolution. Atlantic history approach avoids national frameworks that assume creation of later national division in order to understand larger, integrated region, one that gave rise to later nation states. In reconsidering how past is studied, highlights key connections, interactions, and circuits that gave rise to modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Manipulating, or Being Manipulated by, Environments: Chinese Perspective, 1000 to 1980
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Wang, Y.; Hudson, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisite: English Composition 3. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: While ancient China is often perceived as timeless and isolated place with harmonious human-environment relations, study brings us real history. Examination of not only ups and downs of dynasties, but also power of natural or artificial environments, fluctuating market, demographic trends, and institutional innovations of state and communities. Study structured on three themes: long-term patterns of environmental management, resource management of communities, and environment engineering of imperial and modern state.

HIST 105C – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1700 to Present
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 107B – Armenian History: Armenia from Cilician Kingdom through Periods of Foreign Domination and National Stirrings, 11th to 19th Centuries
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 130 – History of European Political Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to principal themes in history of European political thought from classical antiquity to close of early modern period. Study of outstanding contributions to history of social, political, and moral philosophy in texts of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, More, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Reconstruction of broad intellectual and ideological contexts from which their work emerged to help students make sense of works of political philosophy in their relevant historical setting and to know something about Athenian democracy and its critics, Roman republic and its empire, Renaissance, early modern European civil wars, American and French Revolutions, and Enlightenment. Focus on emergence of some crucial concepts during this period–ideas about state, self, rights, sovereignty, liberty, private property, and more–that define way we think about politics and society in modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Cheung, R.Y.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Gender Studies (GENDER) M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
History (HIST) M170C – History of Women in China, AD 1000 to Present
Course Description: (Same as Gender Studies M170C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics include women and family, women in Confucian ideology, women in literati culture, feminist movement, and women and communist revolution. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 187B – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Medieval
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 187I – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Science/Technology: Gender and Medicine in Early Modern Europe and Atlantic World
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Gherini, C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of historical literature on early modern (1450-1800) history of gender and medicine. Survey of how historians have recovered women’s roles as health care providers and interpreters of body in Europe’s metropolitan centers and its colonies. Examination od how scholars have pursued questions of medical knowledge about reproduction, medical professions’ involvement in creating ideas about gender and sexual difference, and how resulting ideas related to their social and cultural contexts. Study asks how historians have approached history of women as patients–especially ways that religious affiliation, rank, and race shaped women’s experience of childbirth and illness. Students dive deeply into topic of their own choice for final historiographic paper.

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter graing.

Italian

ITALIAN 116A – Italian Renaissance: Renewal of Art and Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Burns, R.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of Quattrocento and its representatives in arts and humanistic thought (i.e., Mantegna, Botticelli, Pico, Valla, and Ficino).
Class Description: Laughing Matters in Renaissance Italy
This course provides an introduction to the Italian Renaissance through the prism of laughter. Laughter was anything but trivial to writers and artists of the time. In fact, it was considered by many to be of great philosophical, social, and pedagogical value. We will explore the humor of the humanists in its various guises, from wit and pleasant comedy to trenchant satire and the grotesque, and consider its place within broader transformations of Renaissance art and thought. Authors will include Alberti, Aretino, Burchiello, Castiglione, Fonte, Galileo, Leonardo, Machiavelli, Poggio, and Pulci. All works will be read and discussed in English, though attention to the Italian originals will be encouraged wherever possible. P/NP or letter grading.

Japanese

JAPAN 50 – Japanese Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Duthie, T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Survey of development of Japanese culture and its relationship to Asiatic mainland. P/NP or letter grading.

Middle Eastern Studies

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century CE. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Musicology

MUSCLG CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Activity: Act 1
Instructor(s): Winkle, M.D. TA
This is a multiple-listed class:
Music (MUSC) M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Musicology (MUSCLG) CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Music History CM90T.) (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with course C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

Philosophy

PHILOS 104 – Topics in Islamic Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Crager, A.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three to four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one philosophy course. Development of philosophy within orbit of Islam from beginning of interaction of Islam with ancient philosophy to period of hegemony of Ottoman Empire. Figures examined may vary but usually include many of al-Kindi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, ben Maimon (Maimonides), Ibn Rushd (Averroes), and Suhrawardi. Topics include central issues in metaphysics and epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.

PHILOS C119 – Topics in History of Philosophy: Relationship of Mind and Body in Early Modern Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Hiltunen, A.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Study of selected philosophers or themes in history of philosophy from different periods (e.g. ancient and medieval, medieval and early modern). May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Concurrently scheduled with course C219. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Students learn how Descartes and Spinoza thought about mind-body relationship. Their approach to problem differs from 20th- and 21st-century discussion, which focuses largely on qualitative consciousness problem. In contrast, these philosophers struggled with question of what it is for mind and body to act together. Body is capable of acting independently of mind, but also that life of mind must be somehow specially related to body. Investigation of their answers to questions including whether mind is distinct from body; in what way mind is united to particular body and not to others; whether mind can interact with body; how emotions and feelings depend on mind-body relationship; and how mental agency and self-control involves having body. Examination of two systematic answers to these questions from Descartes and Spinoza.

Religion, Study of

RELIGN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Asian M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Asian M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60A. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

RELIGN M161C – Korean Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Buswell, R.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Korean (KOREA) CM160 – Korean Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M161C – Korean Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Korean CM160.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in Korea, interactions between indigenous Korean culture and Sinitic traditions of Buddhism, Korean syntheses of imported Buddhist theological systems and meditative techniques, and independent Son (Zen) schools of Korea. Letter grading.

Russian

RUSSN 90A – Introduction to Russian Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Pilshchikov, I.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to Russian culture and society from earliest times to 1917. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian

SCAND 50 – Introduction to Scandinavian Literatures and Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Wen, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50W. Designed for students in general and for those wishing to prepare for more advanced and specialized studies in Scandinavian literature and culture. Selected works from literatures of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and Finland, ranging from myth, national epic, saga, and folktale through modern novel, poem, play, short story, and film, read in English and critically discussed. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 88S – Game of Thrones in Real Life: Ancient Times to Modern Times
Seminar: Sem 1
Instructor(s): Juwadi, K.R.; Lunde, A.O.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Game of Thrones is arguably most popular show in world. For seven seasons, this HBO show captured attention and hearts of viewers of all different backgrounds. While at face value Game of Thrones might simply be entertaining, show tackled wide array of social and political issues. Despite being set in medieval-era fantasy world, themes that are part of Game of Thrones are still applicable to current day. Guided discussion about themes and ideas that Game of Throne touched upon that may not have been noticed. Overview of historical events that relate to Game Thrones. Connection of historical events to Game of Thrones and modern day issues. P/NP grading. Facilitated by Kavya Juwadi, with Arne O. Lunde as faculty mentor.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Colonial Literature in Cinema: Adaptation, Representation, and History
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study visits different representations of colonial period. Analysis, comparison, and relation of existing connections among cinema, literature, and history. Taught in Spanish.