Undergraduate Courses

Winter 2023

AF AMER M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
Course Description: (Same as History M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

AN N EA 12W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Seminar, four hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 10W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architectural monuments, and iconography in relation to written sources. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Development of advanced writing skills and critical thinking. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

AN N EA M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

AN N EA C123A – Coptic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Winnerman, J.P.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Introduction to Coptic, final phase of Egyptian language, which is attested in writing from circa 300 to 1400 CE. Devoted to learning Coptic alphabet, grammar, and vocabulary (Sahidic dialect), with particular emphasis on historical linguistics. Concurrently scheduled with course C223A. P/NP or letter grading.

ARABIC 150 – Classical Arabic Literature in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings in English; knowledge of Arabic not required. Survey of premodern Arabic cultural production in its political, religious, and social contexts. Coverage of pre-Islamic Arabia, rise of Islam, and major themes of Southwest Asian history, along with significant figures and moments in literature and culture of premodern period. Consideration of selected modern responses to Arabic tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

ARCH&UD 10A – Histories of Architecture and Urbanism I
Lecture: Lec 1
Units:5
Instructor(s):TA Osman, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottonian, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C116A – Middle Byzantine Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Horvat, F.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 21. Theory and development of Byzantine art from iconoclastic controversy to 1204. Concurrently scheduled with course C216A. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 119A – Western Islamic Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Overton, K.H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers to Spain, 7th to 16th century. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Islamic Art in Global Museums
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Overton, K.H.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how Islamic art has been collected, displayed, and interpreted in variety of settings including site museum, imperialist collection, blockbuster exhibition, and major renovation. Consideration of challenges posed by Islamic art frame and weaves between local, national, and global perspectives. Students exposed to world-famous museums alongside potentially lesser-known ones.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Modalities of Gothic
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study looks at broad material and cultural mode that is Gothic, beginning with its medieval origins in architecture of basilica of Saint-Denis and continuing, in various media and iterations, through present day. Questions concerning how Gothic came to be, what it is, how it changed, and what it signified over time drive weekly reading, discussion, and student work.

CHIN 50 – Chinese Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wu, Y.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50W. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Introduction to most important aspects of Chinese culture. Topics include early Chinese civilization, historical development of Chinese society, issues of ethnicity, Chinese language and philosophy, and early scientific and technological innovation. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN M60 – Introduction to Chinese Religions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Balkwill, S.
Course Description: (Same as Religion M60B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60W. Knowledge of Chinese not required. General survey of religious life in China, with emphasis on everyday religious practice over doctrine, and themes common to Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN 110B – Introduction to Classical Chinese
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Duthie, N.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: course 110A. Grammar and readings in selected premodern texts. P/NP or letter grading.

CHIN 191A – Variable Topics Research Seminars: Classical China
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Wu, Y.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Research seminar on selected topics in premodern Chinese literature, thought, and culture. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

CHIN C138 – Travel Writing in Premodern China
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Li, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: course 50. Exploration of travel writing in China, with focus on English translations of works by native writers and by foreign visitors through centuries. Concurrently scheduled with course C238. Letter grading.

CHIN 139 – Gardens in China
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Mai, H.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Recommended preparation: course 50. Interdisciplinary survey of historic and literary gardens in China, with focus on English translations of texts by native writers and recent Western scholarship. Letter grading.

CHIN CM160 – Chinese Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Balkwill, S.
Course Description: (Same as Religion M161A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Chinese not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in China, interaction between Buddhism and Chinese culture, rise of Chinese schools of Buddhism. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading.

CHIN 191A – Variable Topics Research Seminars: Classical China
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Wu, Y.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Research seminar on selected topics in premodern Chinese literature, thought, and culture. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

CLUSTER M27B – Global Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.; Young, A.; Slyomovics, S.; Ali, M.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 27B.) (Same as Islamic Studies M27B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course M27A. Introduction to Islam, immensely diverse global tradition which is second largest religion. Study of Islam and Muslims within framework of study of global religious traditions and emphasis on profound diversity of localized belief and practice found across world. Examination of Islam’s evolution across 15 centuries, from late antiquity–when it emerged as localized religion in Central Arabia–to modern era where it is practice from U.S. to Indonesia. Concentration on broad analytical categories in study of religion such as text, culture, history, and prophecy. Students transition to more complex analyses through chronological overview of Islamic history. Study also of case studies of Muslim global networks in arenas such as art, music, literature, and political thought. P/NP or letter grading.

COM LIT 2BW – Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Tentative
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 141B – Introduction to Old English Language and Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Weaver, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Old English language and literature, including grammar and vocabulary, reading and translation of poetry and prose, and discussion of literatures and cultures of Anglo-Saxon England. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 142 – Later Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: Filthy Lucre: Fraudster, Trader, and Usurer in Medieval and Post-Medieval Ages
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of intersection of commerce and literature in medieval and post-medieval texts ranging from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, excerpts from Piers Plowman and Robin Hood narratives, to medievalistic texts such as Gerard Malynes’s Saint George for England. Close reaing of tales such as The General Prologue and Shipman’s, Merchant’s, Pardoner’s, and Summoner’s Tales in light of thinking about filthy lucre (turpe lucrum) found in treatises on avarice, usury, and simony as well as on money and financial speculation. Approaching these tales contextually, exploration of extent to which fraudster, trader, and usurer frequently merge and become indistinguishable from each other. By reading fictional texts through lens of filthy lucre, students gain understanding of how theories and practices of medieval commerce shaped these and other post-medieval writing.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 157 – Translation and Innovation in English Renaissance and Early Modern Period: Ancient Foundations of Modernity: Renaissance Translations from Classics
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of English Renaissance literature and culture in relation to literatures of antiquity and continental Renaissance. Topics may include epic tradition, forerunners of novel, Renaissance humanisms, literature of love, monsters and marvels, representing nature, Ovidian transformations. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Into 20th century, Greco-Roman texts written between 750 BC and circa 200 AD dominated curriculum from grade school through college, in both England and America. These are works of extraordinary importance (e.g., checks-and-balances structure of American constitution comes from first-century BC Greek historian Polybius); and of extraordinary beauty, variety, and intelligence. Focus on English Renaissance translations of classics, because Renaissance was rebirth (re-naissance) of classical learning and literature; and one topic is Tudor-Stuart contexts of these translations. General introduction to classical foundations on which virtually all English and American literature rest. Readings include selections from Cicero, Homer, Ovid, Pliny, Plutarch, and Xenophon on topics as far-flung as love, duty, sex, science, and empire. Includes weekly short paper and final project.

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: Shakespeare and Critical Race Theory
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult Schedule of Classes for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Shakespeare studies have witnessed boom in race studies, especially over past decade. Still, these critical examinations have not homed in more precisely on critical race theory (CRT): that is, theoretical conversations centered in law schools that have found some further explorations in education and to lesser extent in literary-cultural studies. Exploratory study seeks to bring together CRT and Shakespeare. Study asks what kinds of critical readings this produces; what kind of questions CRT brings to Shakespeare; and importantly, what kind of questions Shakespeare brings to CRT. Students read Shakespeare play and at least one CRT selection each week. Students make presentation, and submit smaller writing assignments and final paper.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Medieval Care of Mind
Seminar: Sem 5
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Weaver, E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of writing about cognitive impairment from late antiquity and Middle Ages. Primary focus on how mental illness was understood and treated hundreds of years before advent of asylum and development of psychoanalysis. Medieval thinking about eccentric minds often reflects tension between theories about individual cognition and beliefs in divine or diabolical influences from angels, demons, fairies, and ghosts. At same time, visions, voices, and other devotional experiences trouble distinction between reason and insanity. Readings include medieval medical treatises, chronicles, restorative charms, saints’ lives, first-hand accounts, and poems supplemented by selections from contemporary theorists.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Metaphysical and Cavalier Poetry
Seminar: Sem 4
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Requisites: courses 10A, 10B, and 10C, or 11 and 87, and completion of at least four upper-division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Focus mainly on major 17th-century English lyric poets–Donne, Herbert, Jonson, and Marvell–with frequent reference to less-famous contemporaries such as Carew, Lanyer, and Traherne. Through careful reading and open discussion, students attempt to understand what these poems say–often no small task–but also their place in traditions and revolutions of their society. Study asks what tensions and changes in that culture, as well as in lives of poets, these works might have helped to negotiate; why Metaphysical and Cavalier modes emerged in period of intense theological and political struggle; and what they suggest about sex and nature. Although word count of readings is not high, study is strenuous. Students write five brief response papers and substantial final paper. Students raise questions of all sizes, and participate in discussion of assigned poems and their contexts.

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa AD 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century AD. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): McClendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
Course Description: (Same as African American Studies M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 11B – History of China, circa 1000 to 2000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Goldman, A.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of later history of China–evolution of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from circa 1000 to 2000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, cultural, and economic aspects of early modern regimes and empires and rise of modern China into contemporary era. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 21 – World History, circa 600 to 1760
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Outline of world history from rise of Islam to start of Industrial Revolution, structured around a broad chronological narrative of salient developments. Use of thematic and comparative approaches, with certain recurring themes and institutions that modulate from culture to culture. Reading of variety of contemporary accounts to look at way people perceived cultures outside their own. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Philosophy and Utopia in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult Schedule of Classes for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to discipline of intellectual history, and detailed introduction on how to practice it, in order to make sense of key text in early modern political philosophy: Thomas More’s Utopia (1516). Includes several readings about intellectual history in general; and early modern political, moral, and social theory in particular. Focus on exploration of imaginative and intellectual world of Thomas More’s famous text, title of which pioneered new genre of European political writing. Endlessly enigmatic, profoundly imaginative, and often very funny indeed, More’s text also remains intensely controversial. Study designed to try to explain why.

HIST 102A – Iran and Persianate World
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Green, N.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of model of Persianate world to bring together histories of Iran, India, and central Asia (including Afghanistan) between circa 1200 and 2000. Movement and interaction of different peoples between major cultural centers where Persian was used as common language of intellectual, religious, social, and political exchange. Weekly focus on one particular theme, with lecture material supplemented by translations of writings of princes, poets, tribesmen, travelers, and mystics who created Persian republic of letters between Shiraz, Samarqand, and Delhi, and even as far as Siberia and China. Examination of why and how various ethnic and professional groups made Persian into one of most important languages in world history. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 105B – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1300 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Koh, C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 122A – Cultural and Intellectual History of Modern Europe, 15th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Climates of taste and climates of opinion. Educational, moral, and religious attitudes; art, thought, and manners of time in historical context. Renaissance cultural and intellectual history of Europe. Central themes include comparative history of ideas, theory and practice of art and architecture, civic and religious humanism, religious experience, and new cultural genres of history and philological scholarship. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 135A – Europe and World: Exploration and Conquest, 1400 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. First phase of European expansion in Americas, Africa, and Eurasia. Analysis of motives and methods of expansion, differing patterns of European settlement, including plantation economy, and development of new commercial networks, including Atlantic slave trade. P/NP or letter grading.

ISLM ST C151 – Islamic Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Yarbrough, L.B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 151.) Lecture, three hours. Recommended requisite: introductory course on Islam or instructor consent. Introduction to major fields of inquiry and debate in Islamic studies (e.g., exegesis, Hadith, law, theology, Sufism). Focus on selected topics of debate such as nature of God, jihad, hijab, or pilgrimage. Concurrently scheduled with course C251. Letter grading.

KOREA 50 – History of Korean Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wang, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. General survey of development of Korean culture within context of political, social, and economic history. P/NP or letter grading.

M E STD M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

RELIGN M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Middle Eastern Studies M50B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures–Judaism, Christianity, and Islam–historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

SCAND C133A – Saga
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Sagas are largest extant medieval prose literature. Texts in English, with selections from different types of Icelandic sagas. Consideration of history and society that produced these narratives. Concurrently scheduled with course C233A. Letter grading.

SCAND 138 – Vikings
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Survey of history, anthropology, and archaeology of Scandinavian societies in Viking Age. Consideration of impact of Vikings on Europe and beyond, and depiction of Vikings in sagas and other post-Viking-Age sources. Readings draw on medieval texts and secondary material. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 11A – Catalan Language and Culture I
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Manuel-Oronich, R.; Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, six hours. Preparation: at least two years of college-level Spanish, Portuguese, or another Romance language other than Catalan. Introduction to oral and written Catalan language. Part I of two-term accelerated language sequence equivalent to three terms of traditional pattern and designed for advanced undergraduate and graduate students. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 42 – Iberian Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Required of majors. Lectures taught in English; discussion sections taught in either Spanish or English. Highlights of civilization of Spain, with emphasis on artistic, economic, social, and historical development as background for upper-division courses. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include Convivencia (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Performing One’s Life in 17th-Century Transatlantic Hispanic World
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 25 or 27, and 119. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Performance shaped existence of 17th-century individuals. Men and women–regardless of class and race–gathered at theater, eager to see and to be seen. At end of day, human hearts and minds supplied curious with most genuine and mysterious spectacle to see, asking how others really are inside; and what people hide when they show up in public. Reading of plays by Calderón, Lope de Vega, Ruiz de Alarcón, Sor Juana, and others. Plays guide students through world in which suspicion that everyone in street was performing role was only too real. Individuals feared that everyone else was concealing their true selves. It became necessary to develop tools to see into other’s minds, while keeping one’s own under lock. Only smartest realized that even to spy on others was often easier than to look inside oneself–because no one wants to incur self-hate. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 296 – Graduate Research Group
Research Group Meeting: Rgp 1
Units: 2
Instructor(s): Fuchs, B.
Course Description: Research group meeting, two hours. Limited to graduate students. Designed to bring together graduate students in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss and critique individual research projects, especially dissertation research. S/U grading.

SPAN 191C – Senior Capstone Seminar
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cortinez, V.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 119, 120, and at least three upper-division elective courses required for majors. Limited to senior Spanish majors. Knowledge from previous coursework used to address current trends in discipline; students work with one faculty member on one focused research topic. Culminating paper required. Letter grading.