Graduate Courses

Spring 2020

 

ARABIC 250 – Seminar: Premodern Arabic Literature
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Readings in Arabic texts from variety of periods and genres, along with appropriate secondary literature. Topics include pre-Islamic poetry and oratory, Qur’an, Umayyad and Abbasid poetry and literary prose, Hadith and Fiqh, historiography, biography, geography, medicine, mathematics, theology, asceticism, and mysticism. May be repeated for maximum of 24 units. S/U or letter grading.

ART HIS C220A – Selected Topics in Islamic Art: Art and Technology in Medieval Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in Islamic art and architecture that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C120. S/U or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of intersection between art and technology in medieval Islamic world (600-1500). Themes include representation of technology in paintings and diagrams; agency of instruments and machines; relation between technology, body, and labor; science, magic, and wonder; transcultural aspects of Islamic technology; and critical approaches to golden age of Islam.

ART HIS 220B – Advanced Studies in Islamic Art
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Monuments or theoretical problems related to Islamic culture and artistic production. May be repeated for credit with consent of adviser. S/U or letter grading.

ART HIS C239C – Inca Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Nair, S.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Exploration of art, architecture, and urbanism of Incas from their empire’s height in late 15th century to their political and cultural fragmentation during Spanish occupation of Andes (1532 to 1824). Concurrently scheduled with course C139C. S/U or letter grading.

ART HIS C241 – Colonial Latin American Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Black, C.V.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Art and architecture of colonial Americas from 16th to 18th century. Concurrently scheduled with course CM141. S/U or letter grading.

ENGL 246 – Renaissance Literature
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Shuger, D.K.
Course Description: Seminar, four hours. Studies in poetry and prose of Renaissance English literature, exclusive of Shakespeare; limits of investigation set by individual instructor. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.

ITALIAN 214A – Studies in Medieval Literature: La Divina Commedia
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

RUSSN 211A – Literature of Medieval Rus’
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Required for MA (literature). Survey of the literature from its beginning through the Kievan and Muscovite periods up to end of the 17th century.

SPAN 226 – Prose of the Golden Age: Imagining Community: Faces of Utopia in Early Modern Hispanic World
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Patino Loira, J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings of and lectures on fictional, didactic, religious, and historical writings.
Class Description: Students read early modern works written in Spanish on three continents. Exploration of how highly diverse but hierarchical society envisioned allegedly ideal, or better, communities in ways crucially modeled by series of intercultural, interreligious, and interracial encounters that shaped globalization of 16th and 17th centuries; and by experience of gender and power divides. Topics include how travelers to Istanbul and Beijing reflected on alternative forms of coexistence; how gender shaped community when group of nuns sailed three oceans to found convent in Manila; how gypsies, and other marginalized communities, served as experiments to imagine different legal and social frameworks of coexistence; how racial and religious conflict generated debates on identity and difference in Mediterranean and Atlantic contexts; and how imperialist power relations compromised Jesuit attempts at community building among Paraguay’s Guaraní populations.