Undergraduate Courses

SUMMER 2017

Ancient Near East

AN N ES 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Instructor: Ramos, M.D.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

Arabic

ARABIC 120 – Islamic Texts
Instructor(s): Sadeghi, B.
Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from Qur’an, Tafsir, Hadith, Fiqh. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading. Units: 4

Art History

ART HIS C115F – Medieval Paris
Instructor: Cohen, MM.
Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 21. Material culture, art, architecture, and history of city of Paris to circa 1500. Concurrently schedule with course C215F. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS 119A – Western Islamic Art
Instructor: El Sandouby, A.
(Formerly numbered 104A.) Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers to Spain, 7th to 16th century. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C169 – Selected Topics in Architectural History: Domestic Architecture from Classical to Medieval
Instructor: Pawlowski, M.J.
Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in architectural history that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C269. P/NP or letter grading. Examination of domestic architecture and its development in Mediterranean from classical Greece, through Roman period, and ending with medieval period. Questions addressed include how domestic architecture can be studied; and what remains consistent across cultures and time, and what changes. Examination of material remains of domestic architecture. Exploration of use and function of space in domestic environment and discussion of difficulties inherent in its study. Units: 4

English

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Instructor: Allen, M.J.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: Crime Stories: Literature and Law in Middle Ages
Instructor: Jager, E.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Reading and discussion of crime narratives, both fictional and factual, relating to medieval and early-modern Europe. Topics include murder, theft, rape, property disputes, identity theft, investigative procedures and systems of justice, trial by combat, and capital punishment. Main texts (some excerpted) include The Song of Roland, Njal’s Saga, Arthurian tales, Chaucer, and The Return of Martin Guerre. Includes quizzes, writing assignments, and 2000-word research essay. Not open to students with credit for English 142 in previous summers. Units: 5

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: Robin Hood: Robbing from Medieval Past
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Robin Hood: man with green clothes, quiver of arrows on his back, who is remarkably good shot with bow; steals from rich and gives to poor. Everybody knows Robin Hood. Or more accurately, everybody knows some later version of Robin Hood, whether 1991 film starring Kevin Costner, Disney’s 1973 animated film, or even 1938 Errol Flynn movie. Exploration of how Robin Hood was invented–first in late medieval England, and then again in 19th and 20th centuries. Examination of how particular imaginations of medieval England accompanied those inventions, and what is at stake in their uncritical adoption. Students read series of medieval outlaw tales and Robin Hood texts, follow tradition through early modern ballads and broadsides, into 19th-century stories and novels, and series of films. Three essays required. Units: 5

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare
Instructor: Little, A.L.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

History

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Instructor: Ruiz, T.F.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 119D – Topics in Medieval History: Sex in Middle Ages
Instructor: Markman, K.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Special topics in history of Middle Ages, including religion in society, justice and law, politics of war and diplomacy, economic upheaval and renewal, and cultural representations. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Exploration of treatment of sex and sexuality in medieval scholarship, literature, and art. Topics include gender categories, marriage and family relations, love and romance, medicine, and prostitution. Units: 4

HIST 179B – History of Medicine: Foundations of Modern Medicine
Instructor: Zeleny, C.L.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School. P/NP or letter grading Units: 4

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M110 – Introduction to Islam
Instructors: Metzger, E. and Sayeed, A.
(Same as Religion M109.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Study of Religion

RELIGN M109 – Introduction to Islam
(Same as Islamic Studies M110.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5