Undergraduate Courses

WINTER 2017

Ancient Near East

AN N ES 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Instructor:  Bakhos, C.A.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

AN N EA M50B Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Instructor:  Bakhos, C.A.
(Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Units:  5

Arabic

ARABIC M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Instructor: Slyomovics, S.E.
Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Asian Languages and Cultures

ASIAN M60W Introduction to Buddhism
Instructor:  Bodiford, W.M.
(Same as Religion M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units:  5

JAPAN CM160
Instructor:  Bodiford, W.M.
(Same as Religion M161B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading. Units:  4

JAPAN 174 Classical Japanese Poetry
Instructor:  Duthie, T.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Examination of classical poetry of Nara and Heian periods, with focus on poetry anthology called “Man’yoshu” (Collection of Myriad Ages, 8th century) and on “Kokinwakashu” (Collection of Ancient and Modern Japanese Poems, early 10th century). Letter grading. Units:  4

KOREA 191A Variable Topics Research Seminars:  Premodern or Early Modern Korean History
Instructor:  Duncan, J.
Seminar, three hours. Research seminar on selected topics of interpretation in Korean history from earliest times through mid-19th century. Coverage varies from term to term and includes such topics as state formation, international relations, or sprouts of capitalism thesis. Reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading. Units:  4

S ASIAN CM160 Buddhism in India
Instructor:  Schopen, G.R.
(Same as Religion M161D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Indian languages not required. Overview of social and doctrinal history of Buddhism from its origin to its disappearance in India, based not only on texts but on archaeological, art historical, and inscriptional sources. Examination of both formal doctrine and actual practices and on what learned Buddhists wrote and ordinary Buddhists did, saw, and made. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading. Units:  4

Architecture & Urban Design

ARCH&UD 10A – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism
Instructor(s): Fabbrini, S. and Lavin, S.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Developments in architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600, constructing critical positions within which implications of terms history, architecture, city, and culture can be explored. Focus on examples from Europe and Mediterranean Basin and periodic exploration of world context. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Art History

ART HIS 21 Medieval Art
Instructor:  Cohen, M.M.
(Formerly numbered 51.) Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottoman, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ART HIS C116A – Middle Byzantine Art and Architecture
Instructor: Gerstel, S.E.
(Formerly numbered 105E.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 21. Theory and development of Byzantine art from iconoclastic controversy to 1204. Concurrently scheduled with course C216A. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C117B Selected Topics in Medieval Art: Medieval Sicily
Instructor:  Gerstel, S.E.
Lecture, three hours. Undergraduate Seminar (by permission only). Throughout history, the art and architecture of Sicily has been influenced by the island’s location at the center of the Mediterranean. Although the island’s fertile soil supported a long-term, stable agrarian economy, Sicily also benefited economically, culturally, and politically in the Middle Ages from its position as an important station on trade routes between Europe and Africa, Byzantium and the West. Because of its location, but also because of its layered history, the island boasted a population that was ethnically, linguistically, and religiously diverse. Conditions both external and internal to the island thus had an impact on the creation of art and architecture and on the circulation of goods, both at the elite and household level. The splendid monuments of the Kingdom of Sicily, founded by Roger II, demonstrate how, under the patronage of specific rulers and the sponsorship of members of their court, the island’s diverse cultural strands could be interwoven to create unique works of art and architecture. These works, as we shall see, were intended to manifest connections with cultures located far from the island kingdom. Analysis of the works also provides insights into the make-up of the island’s cosmopolitan culture. In this seminar, we will untangle the Islamic, Romanesque, and Byzantine strands that characterize Norman art and architecture in Sicily. We will also consider how the region’s incomparable ecclesiastical mosaics contributed to the modern understanding of medieval cultures. Concurrently scheduled with course C217B. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

ART HIS C117B Selected Topics in Medieval Art: Digital Gothic
Instructor: Cohen, M.M.
Lecture, three hours. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS 119B – Eastern Islamic Art
Instructor: Overton, K.H.
(Formerly numbered 104B.) Lecture, three hours. From Tigris and Euphrates Rivers through Afghanistan and parts of central Asia; Ottoman Empire. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Instructor: Burke, K.S.
(Formerly numbered M104D.) (Same as Islamic Studies M111 and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading. Units:4

ART HIS C139A – Mayan Art and Architecture
Instructor: Pohl, J.M.
(Formerly numbered C117B.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 27. Study of art of selected Maya-speaking cultures of southern Mesoamerica from circa 2000 B.C. to Conquest, with particular emphasis on history and iconography. Concurrently scheduled with course C239A. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Classics

CLASSIC 88GE –  Venoms, Poisons, and Medicines from Antiquity to Renaissance
Instructor: Touwaide, A.
Seminar, three hours. Focused study of one aspect of ancient Greek or Roman culture or reception of classical tradition. Topics are interdisciplinary in nature (literature, arts, religion, politics, culture) and make connections between ancient and post-classical eras. Topics include rediscovery of Pompeii and Herculaneum; Roman religion and literature; pleasures of Greek or Roman body; and 18th-century British literature and reception of classics. P/NP or letter grading.
Transdisciplinary examination of case stories, theoretical treatises, and reality of venoms and poisons, together with their treatments, from antiquity to Renaissance. Units: 5

CLASSIC 163 – Ovid and Consequences
Instructor:  Martelli, F.K.
Lecture, three hours. Study of Ovid’s “Metamorphoses” and persistence and extent of Roman poet’s influence on subsequent literature, art, and film. Close analysis of Ovid’s seminal text before turning to poem’s classical, medieval, Renaissance, and modern imitators, from Apuleius to Shakespeare to Picasso and beyond. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Comparative Literature

COM LIT M110 – Thousand and One Nights/Alf Layla Wa-Layla
Instructor: Slyomovics, S.E.
(Same as Arabic M110.) Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Arabic not required. Since its appearance in Europe in 1704, “Thousand and One Nights” is most well-known work of Arabic literature in West. Examination of cycle of tales more commonly known as “Arabian Nights,” including history of its translation, contemporary oral performances of tales in Arabic-speaking world, literary emergence of vernacular language in relation to classical Arabic, and Western appropriations of tales in music, film, and novels (Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Barth, Poe, and Walt Disney). P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

English

ENGL 140A Chaucer:  “Canterbury Tales”
Instructor:  Jager, E.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 140B Chaucer:  “Troilus and Criseyde” and Selected Minor Works
Instructor:  Mcnamara, R.F.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of “Troilus and Criseyde” and selected minor works of Chaucer, such as “Book of the Duchess,” “House of Fame,” “Parliament of Fowls,” etc. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 141 Early Medieval Literature
Instructor:  Burdorff, S.F.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Texts and topics include “Beowulf,” Vikings, poems on women, Bede, and King Alfred. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 142 Later Medieval Literature
Instructor:  Thomas, A.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 145 Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent
Instructor:  Thomas, A.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 150A Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Instructor:  Watson, R.N.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 150B Shakespeare: Later Plays
Instructor:  Dickey, S.J.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 153 Theatrical Renaissance:  Early Modern Texts and Performances: London Theater
Instructor:  Braunmuller, A.R.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts — masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari — alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ENGL 184 Capstone Seminar:  From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Instructor:  Jager, E.
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Reading, discussion, and writing about series of works illustrating transformation of ancient epic into medieval romance, with emphasis on themes such as war, eros, justice, spirituality, city or kingdom, and quest. Works considered typically drawn from Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, Chrétien de Troyes’ Lancelot, The Romance of the Rose, The Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur. Students write weekly reports and one 10- to 12-page research essay, plus 10-minute research report to class. Designed for students who have taken course 140A or 141. Units: 5

ENGL 184 Capstone Seminar:  Shakespeare’s Sonnets, Longer Poems, and Their Tudor Contexts
Instructor:  Braunmuller, A.R.
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Consideration of most of Shakespeare’s nondramatic writing in two broad contexts: comparable Tudor poems from Wyatt and Surrey through Sidney and Drayton, and forms in which those poems were published and consumed. Some literary history and some book history and some publishing history, all in one package. Students present at least one secondary text on relevant subject, and write 15- to 20-page paper making use of appropriate secondary criticism. Units: 5

French

FRNCH 114A Survey of French Literature:  Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Instructor:  Stahuljak, Z.
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 12. Masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance literature, including examples of epic (“La Chanson de Roland”), romance (Chrétien de Troyes’ “Yvain”), and Renaissance prose and poetry (including Marot, Du Bellay, Ronsard, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, and Montaigne). P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

Gender Studies

GENDER M170C – History of Women in China, A.D. 1000 to Present
Instructor: Cheung, R.Y.
(Same as History M170C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics include women and family, women in Confucian ideology, women in literati culture, feminist movement, and women and communist revolution. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

History

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa A.D. 843
Instructor:Langdon, J.S.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Broad, historical study of major elements in Western heritage from world of Greeks to that of 20th century, designed to further beginning students’ general education, introduce them to ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to Western civilization, and acquaint them, through reading and critical discussion, with representative contemporary documents and writings of enduring interest. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 1B Introduction to Western Civilization:  Circa AD 843 to circa 1715
Instructor:  Mcclendon, M.C.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Broad, historical study of major elements in Western heritage from the world of the Greeks to that of the 20th century, designed to further beginning students’ general education, introduce them to ideas, attitudes, and institutions basic to Western civilization, and acquaint them, through reading and critical discussion, with representative contemporary documents and writings of enduring interest. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

HIST 9C – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Japan
Instructor: Hirano, K.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of Japanese history from earliest recorded time to the present, with emphasis on development of Japan as a cultural daughter of China. Attention to manner in which Chinese culture was Japanized and aspects of Japanese civilization which became unique. Creation of the modern state in the last century and impact of Western civilization on Japanese culture. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 11B – History of China, circa 1000 to 2000
Instructor: Goldman, A.S.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of later history of China — evolution of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from circa 1000 to 2000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, cultural, and economic aspects of early modern regimes and empires and rise of modern China into contemporary era. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 19 – Fiat Lux Freshman Seminars: Brief and Intense History of Anti-Semitism, from Antiquity to Present
Instructor: Myers, D.N.
Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
Exploration of long and varied career of anti-Semitism. Investigation of diverse forms of phenomenon and its unique ability to assume multiple and even competing guises. Study asks how and why anti-Semitism has persisted for so long, and seeks to understand what lies at its core. Examination of recent controversies that some have described as anti-Semitic in nature and others have argued are instances of legitimate criticism of state of Israel. Units: 1

HIST 21 World History, circa 600 to 1760
Instructor:  Von Glahn, R.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Outline of world history from rise of Islam to start of Industrial Revolution, structured around a broad chronological narrative of salient developments. Use of thematic and comparative approaches, with certain recurring themes and institutions that modulate from culture to culture. Reading of variety of contemporary accounts to look at way people perceived cultures outside their own. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Gender, Sexuality, and Society in Early Modern China, 14th to 20th Centuries
Instructor(s): Gordanier, A.W. and Higbie, F.T.
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
What is gender; what does it mean to be man or woman? What is sexual orientation? What is family, and what is it for? We may know how to answer these questions in 2016, but people in different times and places have answered them in very different ways; those answers are vital part of understanding society and its history. Investigation of vibrant social and cultural history of early modern China, from Ming dynasty (1368-1644) through Qing (1644-1911) and early Republic, through lenses of gender and sexuality. Gender as category of analysis to explore subjects from family and property to crime, labor, politics, and sex and love. Consideration of how these insights lead to new ways of understanding slippery categories of gender and sexual identity in present. Students deepen understanding of history and historiography (theories and methods of writing history) of early modern China, and of ways in which those historical narratives echo to this day. Units: 5

HIST 102A – Iran and Persianate World
Instructor: Green, N.S.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of model of Persianate world to bring together histories of Iran, India, and central Asia (including Afghanistan) between circa 1200 and 2000. Movement and interaction of different peoples between major cultural centers where Persian was used as common language of intellectual, religious, social, and political exchange. Weekly focus on one particular theme, with lecture material supplemented by translations of writings of princes, poets, tribesmen, travelers, and mystics who created Persian republic of letters between Shiraz, Samarqand, and Delhi, and even as far as Siberia and China. Examination of why and how various ethnic and professional groups made Persian into one of most important languages in world history. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4and property to crime, labor, politics, and sex and love. Consideration of how these insights lead to new ways of understanding slippery categories of gender and sexual identity in present. Students deepen understanding of history and historiography (theories and methods of writing history) of early modern China, and of ways in which those historical narratives echo to this day. Units: 5

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Instructor: Piterberg, G.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 105B – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1300 to 1700
Instructor: Morony, M.G.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 119B Medieval Europe, 1000 to 1500
Instructor:  Markman, K.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Basic introduction to Western Europe from Latin antiquity to age of discovery, with emphasis on medieval use of Greco-Roman antiquity, history of manuscript book, and growth of literacy. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

HIST M170C – History of Women in China, A.D. 1000 to Present
Instructor: Cheung, R.Y.
(Same as Gender Studies M170C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics include women and family, women in Confucian ideology, women in literati culture, feminist movement, and women and communist revolution. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 179B – History of Medicine: Foundations of Modern Medicine
Instructor: Zeleny, C.L.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST M182B Medieval Jewish History
Instructor:  Myers, B.E.
(Same as Jewish Studies M182B and Religion M182B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of unfolding of Jewish history from rise of Christianity to expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Honors Collegium

HNRS 55 – Culture and History of Utopias
Instructor: Jacoby, R.
Seminar, three hours. Study of major utopian writings from Thomas More’s classical text to recent ecological and feminist utopian texts, with purpose of uncovering social, intellectual, and cultural landscapes underlying quest for a more perfect society. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HNRS 80 – Cossacks and Narratives about Them
Instructor: Koropeckyj, R.
Seminar, four hours. Designed for College Honors students. Examination of two Cossack societies: Ukrainian (Zaporozhian) Cossacks and Russian (Don) Cossacks. Both emerged in 15th and 16th centuries as warrior societies along contact zone between Slavic world and Muslin Tatar and Turkic world. Their frontier status and liminal culture proved to be mythogenic, and Cossacks figure prominently in imagination of cultures they impacted over centuries, especially in folklore, literature, film, and opera. Study of Cossacks through these media to understand not just Cossack society but ways in which Cossacks have been viewed through paradigms of Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Jewish, Ottoman, and west European cultures. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HNRS 115 – Poetry and Society in England, 1588 to 1688: Verse, Politics, Religion, and Sexuality from Spanish Armada to Glorious Revolution
Instructor: Watson, R.N.
Seminar, three hours. Designed for College Honors students. Poetry of England in century between 1588 and 1688 through prism of evolving political, philosophical, theological, sexual, economic, and scientific practices of that day and vice versa to understand poetry in cultural and historical context. Students research widely on range of subjects from alchemy to zoology and become class resource on some relevant topic such as Renaissance medicine, Calvinism, Scholasticism, Cromwell and New Model Army, Elizabethan foreign policy, Stuart architecture, agricultural and dietary changes, and printing and publishing conventions. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

Iranian

IRANIAN 103B – Advanced Persian: Introduction to Classical Persian Prose
Instructor: Ingenito, D.
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 102C. Students who do exceptionally well in course 20C may be permitted to enroll with consent of instructor. May be taken independently for credit. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Instructor: Burke, K.S.
(Formerly numbered Islamics M111.) (Same as Art History M119C and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Italian

ITALIAN 42C – Italy Through the Ages in English: Food and Literature in Italy
Instructor(s): The Staff
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Profile of Italian history and culture through analysis of gastronomic and literary texts. Special emphasis on late Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Risorgimento. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

ITALIAN 102A – Italian Cultural Experience in English
Instructor(s): The Staff
Lecture, three hours. Study of cultural development of Italy. Roots of Western civilization; social and artistic achievements of communal society; Marco Polo, Dante, Boccaccio, Giotto, rise of Italian merchant class. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

ITALIAN 116B Italian Renaissance:  Power and Imagination in Renaissance
Instructor:  Ciavolella, M.
Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 100. Taught in Italian. Study of artistic world of Leonardo, Raffaello, Michelangelo, Titian, and literary masterpieces of Machiavelli, Castiglione, Ariosto, Tasso, in world molded by powerful political forces, such as Roman Papacy and Medici, Gonzaga, and D’Este courts. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Japanese

JAPAN CM160 – Japanese Buddhism
Instructor: Bodiford, W.M.
(Same as Religion M161B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading. Units: 4

JAPAN 174 – Classical Japanese Poetry
Instructor(s): Duthie, T
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Examination of classical poetry of Nara and Heian periods, with focus on poetry anthology called “Man’yoshu” (Collection of Myriad Ages, 8th century) and on “Kokinwakashu” (Collection of Ancient and Modern Japanese Poems, early 10th century). Letter grading. Units: 4

Jewish Studies

JEWISH 182B Medieval Jewish History
Instructor:  Myers, B.E.
(Same as History M182B and Religion M182B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of unfolding of Jewish history from rise of Christianity to expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Latin

LATIN 131 Postclassical Latin Prose
Haynes, J.A.
Lecture, three hours. Advanced readings of selected texts in postclassical Latin prose. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Middle Eastern Studies

M E STD M50B Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Instructor:  Bakhos, C.A.
(Formerly numbered Near Eastern Languages M50B.) (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

M E STD M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Instructor: Burke, K.S.
(Same as Art History M119C and Islamic Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Music

MUSC M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A.; O’Shaughnessey, M.
(Same as Music History CM90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Music History

MSC HST CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A., O’Shaughnessey, M.
(Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with Musicology C490T. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Philosophy

PHILOS 100B Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Instructor:  Normore, C.G.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended requisite: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

PHILOS 104 – Topics in Islamic Philosophy
Instructor(s): Crager, A.D.
Lecture, three to four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Preparation: one philosophy course. Development of philosophy within orbit of Islam from beginning of interaction of Islam with ancient philosophy to period of hegemony of Ottoman Empire. Figures examined may vary but usually include many of al-Kindi, Ibn Sina (Avicenna), al-Ghazali, ben Maimon (Maimonides), Ibn Rushd (Averroes), and Suhrawardi. Topics include central issues in metaphysics and epistemology. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Political Science

POL SCI 111B Early Modern Political Theory
Instructor:  Pagden, A.R.
Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Machiavelli, More, Montaigne, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Condorcet, and Kant and questions such as representation, property, autonomy, and political economy. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Study of Religion

RELIGN M40 – Christianities East and West
Instructor: Vroon, R
(Same as Slavic M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity — Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

RELIGN M50 Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Instructor:  Bakhos, C.A.
(Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Middle Eastern Studies M50B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading. Units:  5

RELIGN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Instructor: Bodiford, W.M.
(Same as Asian M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60A. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

Scandinavian

SCAND 50W – Introduction to Scandinavian Literatures and Cultures
Instructor: Wen, P.J.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 50. Designed for students in general and for those wishing to prepare for more advanced and specialized studies in Scandinavian literature and culture. Selected works from literatures of Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and Finland, ranging from myth, national epic, saga, and folktale through modern novel, poem, play, short story, and film, read in English and critically discussed. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5

SCAND 133C – Social Network Analysis and Icelandic Family Saga
Instructor: Tangherlini, T.R.
Seminar, three hours. Exploration of how character interactions can be used as basis for developing social network view of stage on which saga action plays out. Examination of how best to model sagas as dynamic social networks and learn about metrics and analytical approaches from social network analysis (SNA) that deepen understanding of saga actions. SNA provides additional opportunity to explore hypothetical situations and recognize alternative social pathways that may have led to other types of community formations. Study of Icelandic saga toward increasing complexity, developing understanding of characters and character roles, and using this as basis of preliminary investigations. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

SCAND 134 – Scandinavian Mythology
Instructor: Ball, K.A.
Seminar, three hours. Overview of major gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, narratives and adventures that make up lore collectively referred to as Scandinavian, or Norse, myth. Reading and examination of this lore that is chiefly preserved in two collections traditionally called “Poetic (or Elder) Edda” and “Prose (or Younger) Edda.” P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

SCAND C171 – Introduction to Scandinavian Folklore
Instructor: Tangherlini, T.R.
Seminar, three hours. Introduction to fairy tales and legends of Scandinavian tradition as well as to interpretive methodologies that strive to answer question why do people tell stories that they tell? Concurrently scheduled with course C271. Letter grading. Units: 4

Slavic

SLAVC M40 Christianities of East and West
Instructor:  Vroon, R.W.
(Same as Religion M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity — Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

Spanish

SPAN 120 – History of Literature
Instructor: Cortinez, V.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 25. Introduction to different ways of looking at literary works as historical phenomena. Presentation of major models for writing history — great narratives, cyclic, teleological, sacred, and profane conceptions. Traditional concepts of literary history and problems of mixed categories (historical epochs versus epochs of style, national history, and world literature). P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 Topics in Early Modern Studies:  El Camino de Santiago
Instructor:  Dagenais, J.C.
Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 25. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include “Convivencia” (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

SPAN 135 Topics in Early Modern Studies: Conquest and Colonization of Latin America: Character Types and Literary Representations
Instructor:  Rodriguez, J.N.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 25. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

SPAN 170 – Topics in Media, Interdisciplinary, and Transhistorical Studies: History of Catalan Literature
Instructor: Dagenais, J.C.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Requisite: course 25. Interrelation between print, visual, and live arts, and way they exist in mass media, new technologies, and different platforms. Possible topics include visual cultures in Latin America, Latin American and Spanish cinema, musical cultures and literature, live arts and performance in popular culture, three-dimensional modeling of material culture, and architecture of medieval Iberia. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Goal is for students to develop familiarity with important authors and trends in history of Catalan literature. Beginning with contemporary period, students read short stories and poetry by prominent Catalan writers such as Rodoreda, Espriu, Foix, Carner, Riba, and others. Brief examination of some important writers of Romantic and Modernist periods, including Maragall, Verdaguer, and Guimerà. Study of key medieval writers: Ramon Llull, Jordi de Sant Jordi, Ausias March, Bernat Metge, Joannot Martorell, and others. Units: 4