Undergraduate Courses

SPRING 2017

Ancient Near East

AN N ES 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Instructor:  The Staff
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.. Units: 5

Arabic

ARABIC 120 – Islamic Texts
Instructor(s): The Staff
Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from Qur’an, Tafsir, Hadith, Fiqh. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading. Units:4

Archaeology

ARCHEOL M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
(Same as Art History M119D, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4.0

Art History

ART HIS M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
(Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading. Units:4.0

ART HIS 121B – Italian Renaissance Art of 15th Century
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
(Formerly numbered 106B.) Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of 15th century. P/NP or letter grading. Units:4.0

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
(Formerly numbered 108A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance. P/NP or letter grading. Units:4.0

ART HIS C126 – Selected Topics in Early Modern Art: Ornament and Print
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in early modern art that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C226. P/NP or letter grading. Units:4
Class Description: Ornament has conventionally been sidelined in art history. This is particularly case for Renaissance and baroque art and architecture since those fields are yoked to categories of style, and their historiographies have focused on biography, artistic intentions, iconography, monuments, and form. In contrast, ornament has been defined as (merely) decoration, devoid of meaning, nonstructural or nonfunctional, supplemental, and liminal. Yet those characteristics of ornament open up insights about mobility and agency of images, processes of metamorphosis and transformation, and imagination. Study includes visits to rich archive of ornamental prints at Hammer Museum Grunewald Center and UCLA printmaking studio; and discussion of art works and readings that engage with diverse media.

Comparative Literature

COM LIT 2BW – Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Instructor(s): Stahuljak, Z.
Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units: 5.0

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading. Units:5.0

ENGL 70 – Medievalisms: Medieval Literature and Contemporary Culture
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for any course in the 140 series. Introduction to medieval texts juxtaposed with modern texts and media to analyze how and why the medieval (in form of crusade, quest, romance, world-construction, etc.) is continually reproduced and transformed in large scale popular productions, novels, film, and television. Textual focus on medieval works in comparison to analysis of 20th- and 21st-century works may include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Le Morte Darthur, Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and Harry Potter. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5.0

ENGL 88L – Lower Division Seminar: Special Topics in English — Folklore and Mythology: Myth, Metamorphosis, and Meaning
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.
Overview of several key figures from classical mythology in their original contexts (ancient epic and tragedy, especially involving Trojan War and its immediate aftermath), examination of transmission and translation of these figures through historical-literary tradition of Western Europe, including Christian moralizations of pagan inheritances and visual culture of continental Renaissance. Close reading of several selections from medieval and early modern English poetry and drama (including Spenser and Shakespeare), with goal of understanding how these later cultures (re)used and (re)imagined figures of classical mythology to reflect their own contemporary experience and concerns. Includes in-class quizzes, midterm examination, and final paper. Units: 5.0

ENGL 98TB – Women’s Utopian Writing, Past and Present
Instructor(s): Verini, A.C., Gallagher, L.
Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Freshmen/sophomores preferred. Examination of women’s utopian writing from Middle Ages to present. Discussion of how these writings serve both as reflections of particular historical moments and as critiques that resonate with different moments in time. Letter grading. Units: 5.0

ENGL M101A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures: Queer Early Modern Literature
Instructor(s): Gottlieb, C.M.
(Same as Gender Studies M105A and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M101A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of discrete period of queer literature from beginning to circa 1850. Works by such writers as Sappho, Plato, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Thomas Gray may be included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Survey of queer early modern literature, including works by Shakespeare and Marlowe. In addition to reading early modern texts, analysis of contemporary film adaptations and recent critical debates in queer early modern studies. Units: 5.0

ENGL M103 – Studies in Disability Literatures: Shakespearean Disability Studies
Instructor(s):  Gottlieb, C.M.
What happens when Shakespeare’s plays are looked at through lenses offered by disability studies? Plays are full of characters with disabilities, but these representations have only recently begun to receive critical attention. Introduction to disability studies and Shakespeare studies by exploration of dynamic points of contact between them. Consideration of how physical and mental differences are marked in texts and performed on stage and in film. Examination of construction of dis/ability in relation to constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. Through analysis of representations of disability in Shakespeare’s time and in present, introduction to history of disability and familiarization with major concepts in disability studies. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality: Shakespearean Drama and Classical Bride of Death
Instructors(s):  Burdorff, S.F.
(same as GENDER M107B and LGBTQS M107B) Shakespeare’s dramatic works engage directly with classical bride of death trope, in which woman who dies immediately before or after marriage is imagined as being married not to mortal husband but to death itself. Examination of multivalent recurrences of this trope (for which Persephone is mythological archetype) in Shakespeare’s dramatic works, including identification and consideration of several related subtypes of bride (e.g., sacrificial virgin, living woman abandoned to death, and woman for whom rape constitutes kind of death). Trope first established in classical contexts, with focus on sources to which Shakespeare would likely have had access. Exploration of reasons trope might have resonated with Shakespeare’s dramatic work, and what its presence might suggest about complex relationships between gender, victimization, power, suffering, strength, and shaping of narrative selfhood in his plays.  P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Instructors(s):  McNamara, R.F.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 140B – Chaucer: “Troilus and Criseyde” and Selected Minor Works
Instructors(s):  McNamara, R.F.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of “Troilus and Criseyde” and selected minor works of Chaucer, such as “Book of the Duchess,” “House of Fame,” “Parliament of Fowls,” etc. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 141 – Early Medieval Literature
Instructor(s):  Jager, E.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Texts and topics include “Beowulf,” Vikings, poems on women, Bede, and King Alfred. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Instructor(s):  Cunningham, K.J.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Resourceful Shakespeare: Origins, Analogs, and Offshoots
Instructor(s):  Dickey, S.J.
Exploration of selected plays by William Shakespeare from general perspective of source study, considering both Shakespeare’s use of sources and use of Shakespeare as source. Students read some narrative and dramatic works that Shakespeare used in crafting his own plays to better understand playwright’s transformational strategies. Students gain fresh awareness of plays’ particular idiosyncrasies and more complex sense of Shakespearean imitation and originality. Consideration of those plays as sources, in turn, as they are ripped off/riffed on by modern theatrical, cinematic, and musical derivatives. Although main focus is Shakespeare’s plays, students also acquire sense of their durable importance as cultural properties, resources, and totemic objects of veneration, homage, allusion, and parody. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 151 – Milton
Instructor(s):  McEachern, C.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Shakespeare and Gender
Instructor(s):  Cunningham, K.J.
Wherever one looks in Shakespeare, men ponder how to deal with each other and with women; women ponder what it means to be female; and characters who differ from these binary norms struggle (sometimes comically, sometimes tragically) to find their space in dramatic worlds. Throughout his works Shakespeare stages complex notions of masculinity, femininity, and difference. Study looks at several plays and poems to understand playwright’s investment in constructing gender according to particular aesthetic, dramatic, social, and ideological goals. What does association of domesticity, business, or violence with femininity or masculinity in The Taming of The Shrew tell us about author’s notions of selfhood and sexuality? What should be made of implications of fluidity of desire in Twelfth Night? How do anonymous pamphlets Hic Mulier: or, The Man-Woman and Haec Vir: or, The Womanish Man contribute to understanding? Students make brief oral presentation and one final paper/project. Letter grading. Units:  5

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Metaphysical and Cavalier Poetry
Instructor(s):  Watson, R.N.
Focus primarily on canonical figures of earlier 17th-century English lyric poetry (Donne, Herbert, Jonson, and Marvell) alongside less-famous contemporaries such as Carew and Traherne; and on some crucial themes of period: economic inequality, science versus magic, radicals versus conservatives, gender and sexuality, Protestant Reformation, appeal of nature, and fear of death. Through careful reading and open discussion, students attempt to understand not only what these poems say–often no small task–but also their place in configurations of Jacobean and Caroline society. What tensions and changes in that culture, and in lives of poets, might these works have helped to negotiate? How and why did metaphysical and cavalier modes emerge in period of intense theological and political struggle, and what is interplay of form, content, and meaning? What kind of work did they do, and how well did they do it? What kinds of work should students do on them now? Letter grading. Units:  5.0

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Apocalypse, Again: Touchstones, Forms, and Mutations
Instructor(s):Gallagher, L.
Overview of deep history of apocalyptic imagination, from biblical antiquity to 20th-century expressions in literature, philosophical inquiry, film, and musical soundscapes. Readings address questions of how current popularity of apocalyptic expression reshapes or deforms cultural concerns commonly associated with apocalyptic mode in premodern and early modern cultures, and how apocalyptic toolkit promotes altered notions of futurity, pastness, and what it means to inhabit present. Texts include biblical touchstones (Revelation, Daniel); modern and late modern philosophical interventions (from Walter Benjamin to Giorgio Agamben); and literary appropriations: medieval dream visions, Shakespeare’s Measure for Measure, early modern proto-science fiction (Cavendish’s The Blazing World), and recent dystopian fiction (Sebald’s Rings of Saturn). Units: 5.0

French

FRNCH 16 – Society And Self in Early Modern France
Instructor(s):  Melzer, S.E.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Role of religion, politics, and sociability in constructing self and understanding its relation with society in early modern France. Development of students’ critical thought and knowledge of French and European intellectual tradition. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

FRNCH 116 – Studies in Renaissance French Culture and Literature
Instructor(s):  Carron, J.
Lecture, three hours. Taught in French. Study of Renaissance French culture and literature, including la Pléiade and 16th-century poetry, linguistic and poetic revolution, novel and early prose, and late French humanism. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Gender Studies

GENDER M105A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures
Instructor(s):  Gottlieb, C.M.
(Same as English M101A and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M101A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of discrete period of queer literature from beginning to circa 1850. Works by such writers as Sappho, Plato, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Thomas Gray may be included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

GENDER M107B – Studies in Gender and Sexuality: Shakespearean Drama and Classical Bride of Death
Instructor(s):  Burdorff, S.F.
Shakespeare’s dramatic works engage directly with classical bride of death trope, in which woman who dies immediately before or after marriage is imagined as being married not to mortal husband but to death itself. Examination of multivalent recurrences of this trope (for which Persephone is mythological archetype) in Shakespeare’s dramatic works, including identification and consideration of several related subtypes of bride (e.g., sacrificial virgin, living woman abandoned to death, and woman for whom rape constitutes kind of death). Trope first established in classical contexts, with focus on sources to which Shakespeare would likely have had access. Exploration of reasons trope might have resonated with Shakespeare’s dramatic work, and what its presence might suggest about complex relationships between gender, victimization, power, suffering, strength, and shaping of narrative selfhood in his plays. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

GENDER M133C – History of Prostitution
Instructor(s):  Norberg, K.
(Same as History M133C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. History of prostitution from ancient times to present. Topics include toleration in medieval Europe, impact of syphilis, birth of courtesan, regulation in 19th-century Europe, white slavery scare, and contemporary global sex trade. Readings include novels, primary sources, and testimony by sex workers. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

General Education Clusters

GE CLST 21CW – History of Modern Thought: Special Topics: Making and Knowing
Instructor(s):  Eilersten Ruby, T., Kelty, C.M.
In rise of modern science, making and knowing were closely intertwined. Study reflects upon epistemological transformations of early modern (1350-1750) and modern (1750-1950) periods by examination of practices, techniques, materials, settings, and meanings associated with skilled craft and artistic practices, and with technological production. Study covers issues including embodied knowledge and material epistemology; interaction between practice and theory in production of scientific knowledge; intersections between art and science; and questions of historical methodology/evidence in reconstruction of historical experience. Readings include primary and secondary sources drawn from history of science and technology, material culture studies, and art history. Students also participate in reconstruction of historical practices and techniques. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units:  6.0

History

HIST 2C – Religion, Occult, and Science: Mystics, Heretics, and Witches in Western Tradition, 1000 to 1600
Instructor(s):  Ruiz, T.F.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Specific aspects of elite and popular culture in medieval and early modern Europe. Manner in which men and women sought to explain, order, and escape terrors of their lives by embracing transcendental religious experiences and dreaming of apocalypse and witchcraft. Examination of experiences in context of genesis of the state, birth of a new science, and economic and social change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

HIST 9C – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Japan
Instructor: Hirano, K.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of Japanese history from earliest recorded time to the present, with emphasis on development of Japan as a cultural daughter of China. Attention to manner in which Chinese culture was Japanized and aspects of Japanese civilization which became unique. Creation of the modern state in the last century and impact of Western civilization on Japanese culture. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 5

HIST 96W – Introduction to Historical Practice: Ideas of Europe: Travel in Renaissance and Reformation Europe
Instructor(s):  Renton, K.E.
Travel, from medieval precedents to early-modern exploration and colonization, produced remarkable variety of images of human diversity. In travel writing, traveler reveals as much about himself and his point of view as areas about which he writes. How did Europeans view land and people they saw while traveling on pilgrimage, diplomatic mission, trade, and conquest? How did Europeans view each other? What were ideas of Europe? Exploration of diverse and dynamic world of Renaissance and Reformation Europe, with special emphasis on cultural, political, and religious encounters that transformed European culture. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading. Units:  5.0

HIST 97B – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in Medieval History: Encounters of Third Kind: Exploring Unknown in Medieval and Early Modern Europe
Instructor(s):  Markman, K.
Examination of role of travel narratives and adventure stories in shaping western ideas of peoples, lands, and possibilities beyond Europe. Comparison of actual explorers’ accounts with descriptions of journeys to fantastical worlds to understand role of real and imagined, perceived and conceived in construction of cultural and spatial boundaries. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History
Instructor(s):Stacey, P.J.
Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

HIST 105C – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1700 to Present
Instructor(s):  Gelvin, J.L.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST 108A – History of North Africa from Islamic Conquest
Instructor(s):  Morony, M.G.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of political, social, economic, and religious history of Islamic West (Maghrib) from Muslim conquest in 7th and 8th centuries C.E. until 1578. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST 116B – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4.0

HIST 125D – History of Low Countries
Instructor(s):  The Staff
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of aspects of Dutch (and on occasion Belgian) history from medieval period to period after World War II, with emphasis on political and cultural history. Topics include Middle Ages, Dutch Republic in 17th and 18th centuries, Low Countries from 1830 to 1918, Netherlands and Belgium in context of Europe after 1945. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST 129A – Social History of Spain and Portugal: Age of Silver in Spain and Portugal, 1479 to 1789
Instructor(s):  Ruiz, T.F.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Development of popular history in Iberian Peninsula. Emphasis on peasants and urban history, gold routes, slave trade, history of women, and development of different types of collective violence. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST M133C – History of Prostitution
Instructor(s):  Norberg, K.
(Same as Gender Studies M133C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. History of prostitution from ancient times to present. Topics include toleration in medieval Europe, impact of syphilis, birth of courtesan, regulation in 19th-century Europe, white slavery scare, and contemporary global sex trade. Readings include novels, primary sources, and testimony by sex workers. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

HIST 180A – Topics in History of Science: Deepest Order of Universe: Mathematics and Culture from Pythagoras to Computers
Instructor(s):  Alexander, A.
Sometime in 5th century BCE philosopher Hippasus of Metapontum was thrown into stormy sea by his Pythagorean brethren and drowned. His crime was unforgivable: he had shown that world could not be perfectly described by whole numbers. To Pythagoreans this was shocking setback, but quest to uncover rational order of world was only beginning. From Hipassus’ day to present, generations of scholars have sought deepest, most unshakeable truths that govern universe: they called them mathematics. Study traces key episodes in mathematical search for deep order of universe–from Pythagoreans’ quixotic quest to Euclid’s rigorous geometrical universe; from mathematicians in age of discovery who viewed field as voyage of exploration, to those who saw it as template for fixed hierarchical political order; and from Enlightenment mathematicians who sought out secret rhythms of nature, to modern ones who banished mathematics to its own ethereal realm, separate from world. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Honors Collegium

HNRS 1 – Plague Culture
Instructor(s):  Goodwin, J.E.
Seminar, three hours. Study of episodes and metaphors of plague in Western culture from ancients into age of AIDS. Topics include scripture, ancient tragedy, Black Death, realist novel, high aesthetic metaphors of plague, Nazi propaganda, existential and absurdist thought, postwar cinema, contemporary American theater, and modern science and medicine. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

HNRS 8 – Life, Death, and Everything in Between
Instructor(s):  Moreno, E.A.
Seminar, three hours. Designed for College Honors students. Literature course with classic texts used to explore various aspects of human condition as they relate to health and illness. Broad themes including creation, death, deformity, madness, contagion, infirmity, and alienation to be drawn from texts spanning Shakespeare to Plath. Texts selected to illuminate one central aspect of human experience to be examined in its historical context as well as in context of contemporary practice of medicine. Exploration of social, philosophical, and ethical issues pertaining to each theme and timely and controversial aspects of modern healthcare. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Instructor(s):  Burke, K.S
(Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN 42A – Italy through Ages in English: Early Modern Italy
Instrucotr(s):  Moudarres, A.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Italy’s unique contribution to Western civilization in development of humanist and Renaissance learning, political and philosophical thought, science, architecture, and arts in cities such as Venice, Padua, Florence, Rome, and Naples. Works by Giotto, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael, Machiavelli, Galileo, and Vico. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5.0

ITALIAN 103A – Introduction to Classic Italian Literary and Cultural Studies
Instructor(s):  Tognozzi, E.A.
Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 100. Taught in Italian. Selected classic works of Italian literature, theater, art, and culture from medieval era to Renaissance and baroque. Emphasis on critical methods and skills for analyzing and interpreting wide range of Italian texts and cultural formations in their historical context and in comparison to contemporary and transnational views. Representative authors may include Saint Francis of Assisi, Dante, Petrarch, Boccaccio, Saint Catherine of Siena, Machiavelli, Giotto, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo, Caravaggio, Gaspara Stampa, Veronica Franco, Ariosto, Tasso, and Galileo. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Korean

KOREA CM160 – Korean Buddhism
Instructor(s): Buswell, R.E.
(Same as Religion M161C.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in Korea, interactions between indigenous Korean culture and Sinitic traditions of Buddhism, Korean syntheses of imported Buddhist theological systems and meditative techniques, and independent Son (Zen) schools of Korea. Concurrently scheduled with course C260. Letter grading.Units: 4.0

Latin

LATIN 133 – Postclassical Latin Poetry
Instructor(s):  Haynes, J.A.
Lecture, three hours. Advanced readings of selected texts in postclassical Latin poetry. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Middle Eastern Studies

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Instructor(s):  Burke, K.S.
(Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Music History

MSC HST CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A., O’Shaughnessey, M.
Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with Musicology C490T. P/NP or letter grading. Units: 4

Philosophy

Topics in Medieval Philosophy: History of Skepticism from Hellenistic Time to Descartes
Instructor(s):  Lagerlund, C.H.
Skepticism was quite different in ancient times than it is now. Presentation of history of skepticism as introduced in later Greek and early Roman philosophy, and developed through Middle Ages up until time of Descartes. Covers both Pyrrohnian and Academic skepticism, and Augustine’s rejection of Academic skepticism. Study looks at how interest in skepticism dropped off in earlier parts of the Middle Ages, but was reintroduced in early 14th century. At that time, new skepticism developed based on idea of God as deceiver; that is, what is now called external world skepticism. Study looks at reaction to this, as well as new-found interest in skepticism in 16th century just before time of Descartes. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Political Science

POL SCI 111B Early Modern Political Theory
Instructor:  Barringer, E.B.
Lecture, three or four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exposition and critical analysis of major thinkers such as Machiavelli, More, Montaigne, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Smith, Condorcet, and Kant and questions such as representation, property, autonomy, and political economy. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4

Study of Religion

RELIGN 101 – History of Study of Religion
Instructor(s):  Scull, K.R.
Lecture, four hours. Recommended requisite: History 4. Survey of major modern theories, methods, and approaches to study of religion to situate them within their own historical, philosophical, and social contexts. Critical consideration of changing and contested meanings of term religion and its relationship to such categories as science and magic, as well as to other domains of social experience. Examination of how study of religion has interacted with other academic fields, especially biblical studies, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and evolutionary biology. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

RELIGN 120 – Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Comparative Approach
Instructor(s):  Krauss, R.
Seminar, three hours. Introduction to analysis of complex relationship of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam as living traditions whose historical origins, current interactions, and future development continue to shape spiritual, cultural, political, and social aspects of human civilization in 21st century. Letter grading. Units:  4.0

RELIGN M161C – Korean Buddhism
Instructor(s):  Buswell, R.E.
(Same as Korean CM160.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Korean not required. Introduction and development of Buddhism in Korea, interactions between indigenous Korean culture and Sinitic traditions of Buddhism, Korean syntheses of imported Buddhist theological systems and meditative techniques, and independent Son (Zen) schools of Korea. Letter grading. Units:  4.0

Scandinavian

SCAND 40 – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Instructor(s):  Ball, K.A.
Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40W. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including “Nibelungenlied,” “Volsunga saga,” “Eddas,” and “Beowulf.” Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0

Spanish

SPAN 42 – Iberian Culture
Instructor(s): Torrecilla, J.
Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Required of majors. Lectures taught in English; discussion sections taught in either Spanish or English. Highlights of civilization of Spain, with emphasis on artistic, economic, social, and historical development as background for upper division courses. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  5

SPAN 160 – Topics in Spanish Linguistics
Instructor(s):  Quicoli, A.C.
Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 25. Exploration of origin of language, how Spanish is acquired, evolution of Spanish from Latin to early modern period, how Spanish varies in world, how to teach Spanish, Spanish in contact with other languages. Possible topics include Spanish in Los Angeles, history of Spanish language, first- and second-language acquisition, language and cognition. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading. Units:  4.0