Undergraduate Courses

SPRING 2018

 

Ancient Near East

Ancient Near East (AN N EA)
AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Arabic

ARABIC M106 – Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class: Arabic M106 – Qur’an, Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M108 – Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Religion M108.) Lecture, three hours. How Qur’an as scripture shapes Muslim doctrine, rituals, and culture, and how throughout history Muslims have determined interpretations and applications of Qur’anic doctrines and prescriptions. Critical evaluation and analysis of contemporary discourses on Islam. Letter grading.

ARABIC 150 – Classical Arabic Literature in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Readings in English; knowledge of Arabic not required. Survey of premodern Arabic cultural production in its political, religious, and social contexts. Coverage of pre-Islamic Arabia, rise of Islam, and major themes of Southwest Asian history, along with significant figures and moments in literature and culture of premodern period. Consideration of selected modern responses to Arabic tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

Archaeology

ARCHEOL M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Art History

ART HIS 22 – Renaissance and Baroque Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 57.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of Renaissance and baroque art. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt;
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Islamic Studies M112, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C120 – Selected Topics in Islamic Art: Islamic Art and Architecture before 1500
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Balafrej, L.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C104C.) Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in Islamic art and architecture that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C220A. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Survey of pre-modern Islamic art and architecture from Mediterranean to Middle East to China, emphasizing both historical and critical approaches. Analysis of Islamic objects and monuments in their social and political landscape, but also with regards to modern concepts and institutions that have informed their study.

ART HIS 124 – Northern Renaissance Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 108A.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 22. Painting and sculpture in Northern Renaissance. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C139B – Aztec Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pohl, J.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered C117D.) Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 27. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and other arts of Nahuatl-speaking peoples of central Mexico, with emphasis on their social and historical context and major scholarly debates. Concurrently scheduled with course C239B. P/NP or letter grading.

Asian

ASIAN 151 – Buddhist Literature in Translation
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Bodiford, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Recommended preparation: prior course on Buddhism or traditional Asian religions. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. Readings from variety of Buddhist literature of Indic and non-Indic origin, with emphasis on key Buddhist themes and critical issues in cross-cultural interpretations of Asian religious texts. Letter grading.

Clusters

CLUSTER 30B – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Watkins, S.J.; Burdorff, S.F.; Yokoyama, O.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 30A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration in depth of particular mythological traditions, aspects of storytelling, role of myth in culture, society, and/or art, and contributions of various disciplines to study of myth. Letter grading.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth — Special Topics: Love and War: Trojan War from Ancient Greece to Early Modern England
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Overview of several key figures from classical mythology in their original contexts (ancient epic and tragedy, especially Trojan war and its immediate aftermath). Examination of transmission and translation of these figures through historical-literary tradition of Western Europe, including Christian moralizations of pagan inheritances and visual culture of continental Renaissance. Close reading of several selections from medieval and early modern English poetry and drama (including Shakespeare), with goal of understanding how these later cultures (re)used and (re)imagined figures of classical mythology to reflect their own contemporary experiences and concerns. Includes in-class quizzes, reading responses, and final paper.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth — Special Topics: Medievalism and Mythology in Postcolonial World
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Matabang, S.L.; Watkins, S.J.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Along with soldiers, missionaries, and others sent by European nations to reinforce imperial dominance in colonies came another influential force: stories. Medieval narratives that popularly circulated in Europe found new audiences in colonies of Americas and Southeast Asia. Well-known figures such as King Arthur, Roland, Doncella Teodor, and other figures of legend and folktale were adapted into various media from manuscripts and chapbooks to novels, comic books, and television. Topics include what role these stories play in colonial project, what their relationship is with national identity, and how they affect local narrative traditions and mythologies. Students contemplate questions related to burgeoning academic field of postcolonial medievalism while analyzing unique texts, some of which have seen little academic study. Readings cover variety of national traditions and genres, from Celtic prose narrative to Philippine metrical romances to Mexican comics.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth — Special Topics: Evolution of Arthurian Narratives
Seminar: Sem 7
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Voronca, D.V.; Watkins, S.J.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of how Arthurian narratives have evolved, in conception and reception, from traditional sources to modern retellings. Examination of contextual influences on form and content, how stories adapt to different genres and media, and accumulated effect of such shifts on contemporary perceptions. Investigation moves beyond chivalric hero and courtly love to realms of politics, gender, and religion. Students apply their knowledge of traditional storytelling and trace how this particular narrative cycle continues to be pervasive and persistent.

CLUSTER 30CW – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth — Special Topics
Seminar: Sem 9
Units: 6
Instructor(s): TA, Watkins, S.J.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30CW.) Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 30B. Limited to first-year freshmen. Topics may include myth and modern art (including literature, music, and film), myth and ritual, oral tradition and orality, myth and political ideology, myth and science, hero and trickster, and myths of creation. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

Comparative Literature

COM LIT 180 – Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Foundations of Western Medicine, from Hippocrates to Vesalius
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Touwaide, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of defined periods and approaches in medical humanities, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions in dialogue with other disciplines such as anthropology, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description :The Greek physician Hippocrates is traditionally identified as father of medicine. This affirmation drastically abbreviates medicine’s long history, from Antiquity to dawn of modern science. From Hippocrates to recovery and renewed analysis of ancient medicine in Renaissance best heralded by Vesalius, study presents development and transmission of knowledge in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Byzantium; through Middle Ages, Arabic world, and Renaissance. Focus on achievements, theories, and beliefs of great figures while examining their environmental, societal, religious, cultural, economic, and technical contexts. Survey of knowledge of human body–its functions and dysfunctions, and methods for its study; ways of preserving health, preventing disease, and treating illness; and many parameters that favored or limited investigation.

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 70 – Medievalisms: Medieval Literature and Contemporary Culture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour; Requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for any course in the 140 series. Introduction to medieval texts juxtaposed with modern texts and media to analyze how and why the medieval (in form of crusade, quest, romance, world-construction, etc.) is continually reproduced and transformed in large scale popular productions, novels, film, and television. Textual focus on medieval works in comparison to analysis of 20th- and 21st-century works may include Beowulf, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Le Morte Darthur, Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and Harry Potter. P/NP or letter grading.
ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Little, A.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL M103 – Studies in Disability Literatures: Shakespearean Disability Studies
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Gottlieb, C.M.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of modes of disability in literature, with specific emphasis on thematic concerns. Topics may include introduction to disability studies; race, gender, and disability; disability narratives; etc. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 114 – Lyric Histories: Hamlet’s Lyric Histories
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Morphew, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Exploration of lyric poetry in English across centuries. Topics may include historical evolution of aesthetic forms, changing concepts of
dramatic personae, matter of literary influence, and complex relationship of individual lyric speakers with their social and historical contexts. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 139 – Individual Authors: English Petrarchism
Lecture: Lec 2
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Morphew, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Specialized study of work of one single Anglophone poet, dramatist, prose writer, or novelist. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Francesco Petrarca (Petrarch) has been called father of Renaissance and father of humanism. These stone-etched encomiums obscure his work’s peculiarities and priorities, both of which have exerted mighty influence on Western civilization. Students read Petrarch’s scholarship and creative writing in hopes of better understanding why he found “more pleasure with the dead than the living.” Relevant English poetry and criticism also presented. Students write two papers, give presentation, and take midterm exam.
ENGL 140A – Chaucer: “Canterbury Tales”
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introductory study of Chaucer’s language, versification, and historical and literary background, including analysis and discussion of his long major poem, “Canterbury Tales.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 141 – Early Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Burdorff, S.F.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Texts and topics include “Beowulf,” Vikings, poems on women, Bede, and King Alfred. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Mystics and Misogynists: Women and Medieval Church
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Winningham, T.E.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: Black Knights, Fair Maidens, and Saracens: Using and Misusing Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Moyer, H.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 149 – Medievalisms: Black Knights, Fair Maidens, and Saracens: Using and Misusing Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Moyer, H.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of postmedieval production of Middle Ages as period for scholarly study, tactical premodern other to modern and contemporary, and commodity continually reinvented by postmedieval writers, artists, and popular media. Topics may include 19th-century production of medieval studies and its links to nationalism, notable medievalists and their work, and uses of Middle Ages in popular culture from Umberto Eco to Tolkien, Robin Hood, Arthur, and Merlin. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Resourceful Shakespeare: Origins, Analogs, and Offshoots
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 153 – Theatrical Renaissance: Early Modern Texts and Performances: London Theater
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Topics may include professional and amateur performances in court, cities, churches, and countryside of varied sorts of texts — masques, religious drama, secular drama, charivari — alongside examination of texts, performers, and performance spaces from 1509 to 1642. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 181B – Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Radicalism and Dissent: Protestantism and English Literature, 1640 to 1799
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Maniquis, R.M.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: London Theater and New King
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Students read plays by Shakespeare and his principal rival Thomas Middleton, all first written and performed in years immediately after Queen Elizabeth’s death and accession of James I. Some familiarity with Shakespeare is advantage, as is familiarity with drama as genre.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Shakespeare and Gender
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Cunningham, K.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Wherever one looks in Shakespeare, men ponder how to deal with each other and with women; women ponder what it means to be female; and characters who differ from these binary norms struggle (sometimes comically, sometimes tragically) to find their space in dramatic worlds. Throughout his works Shakespeare stages complex notions of masculinity, femininity, and difference. Study looks at several plays and poems to understand playwright’s investment in constructing gender according to particular aesthetic, dramatic, social, and ideological goals. What does association of domesticity, business, or violence with femininity or masculinity in The Taming of The Shrew tell us about author’s notions of selfhood and sexuality? What should be made of implications of fluidity of desire in Twelfth Night? How do anonymous pamphlets Hic Mulier: or, The Man-Woman and Haec Vir: or, The Womanish Man contribute to understanding? Students participate regularly in weekly discussions, make brief oral presentation and produce one final paper/project.

French

FRNCH 114A – Survey of French Literature: Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Carron, J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 12. Masterpieces of medieval and Renaissance literature, including examples of epic (“La Chanson de Roland”), romance (Chrétien de Troyes’ “Yvain”), and Renaissance prose and poetry (including Marot, Du Bellay, Ronsard, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, and Montaigne). P/NP or letter grading.

History

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Tutino, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Philosophy and Utopia in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to discipline of intellectual history. Study offers detailed introduction on how to practice it in order to make sense of key text in early modern political philosophy: Thomas More’s Utopia (1516). A number of readings about intellectual history in general, and early modern political, moral and social theory in particular, are on syllabus; but study focused on exploration of imaginative and intellectual world of Thomas More’s famous text, title of which pioneered new genre of European political writing. Endlessly enigmatic, profoundly imaginative, and often very funny indeed, More’s text also remains intensely controversial; study tries to explain why.

HIST 105C – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1700 to Present
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 107A – Armenian History: Armenia in Ancient and Medieval Times, 2nd Millennium B.C. to A.D. 11th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 107B – Armenian History: Armenia from Cilician Kingdom through Periods of Foreign Domination and National Stirrings, 11th to 19th Centuries
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Aslanian, S.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 108B – History of Islamic Iberia
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Survey of political, social, economic, religious, artistic, and literary history of Islamic culture in Western Europe. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116B – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 119D – Topics in Medieval History: Myth of Superhero, Then and Now
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Markman, K.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Special topics in history of Middle Ages, including religion in society, justice and law, politics of war and diplomacy, economic upheaval and renewal, and cultural representations. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of evolution of heroic ideal in western civilization from antiquity to present, with emphasis on Middle Ages. Through close reading of primary sources, students learn to contextualize experience of heroes in western tradition; and to identify policies, institutions, worldviews, and circumstances that shaped presentation of that hero. Discussion of contemporary comic-book culture, including special presentations by comic-book artists and creators. Assignments range from written analysis to performances and comic-book inspired project.

HIST 130 – History of European Political Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stacey, P.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to principal themes in history of European political thought from classical antiquity to close of early modern period. Study of outstanding contributions to history of social, political, and moral philosophy in texts of major thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, More, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Reconstruction of broad intellectual and ideological contexts from which their work emerged to help students make sense of works of political philosophy in their relevant historical setting and to know something about Athenian democracy and its critics, Roman republic and its empire, Renaissance, early modern European civil wars, American and French Revolutions, and Enlightenment. Focus on emergence of some crucial concepts during this period — ideas about state, self, rights, sovereignty, liberty, private property, and more — that define way we think about politics and society in modern world. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 179A – History of Medicine: Historic Roots of Healing Arts
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Zeleny, C.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Introduction to traditions, practices, goals, and myths of Western healing professions from time of ancient Greeks to Renaissance. Topics range from Hippocrates, Galen, and scholars at Alexandria to healing at Epidaurus and Salerno, contributions of medieval Muslim and Jewish doctors, rise of healing professions, medical faculties, nursing orders, and hospitals. P/NP or letter grading.

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Middle Eastern Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN 42A – Italy through Ages in English: Saints and Sinners in Early Modern Italy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of issues of cultural hegemony, political and religious freedom, and doctrinal conflict through Italy’s early modern literary and artistic production. Texts may include Dante’s Divine Comedy, Boccaccio’s Decameron, Saint Catherine’s letters, Machiavelli’s The Prince, and Galileo’s scientific writings. Artworks may include those of Raphael and Michelangelo, as well as Bernini’s sculptures. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 216B – Studies in the Renaissance: Ariosto and Renaissance Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. S/U or letter grading.

Jewish Studies

JEWISH 150B – Hebrew Literature in English: Rabbinic Judaism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Keiter, S.A.; Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Topics include emergence of rabbinic Judaism; its original literary forms; rabbinic worldview; forms of medieval rabbinic literature; modern Jewish religious movements and their attitude to rabbinic Judaism. May be taken independently for credit.

Middle Eastern Studies

M E STD M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Archaeology (ARCHEOL) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Art History (ART HIS) M119D – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M112 – Archaeology and Art of Christian and Islamic Egypt
Course Description: (Same as Archaeology M112, Art History M119D, and Islamic Studies M112.) Lecture, three hours. Culture of Egypt transformed gradually after Muslim conquest in mid-7th century C.E. According to material evidence such as ceramics, textiles, architectural forms, and building techniques, it is functionally impossible to separate pre-Islamic Christian Egypt from early Islamic Egypt. Although population may have become largely Muslim by 10th century, Egypt remained Coptic in many senses even to 14th century and retains sizeable Christian minority to present. Survey of archaeological remains and standing architecture of Egypt from 6th to 19th century, charting changes and continuities in material culture and shifts in human geography and land use. P/NP or letter grading.

Music

MUSC M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Actvity: Act 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A.; Rostomyan, A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Music History (MSC HST) CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with Musicology C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

Music History

MSC HST CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Actvity: Act 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A.; Rostomyan, A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Music (MUSC) M90T – Early Music Ensemble
Course Description: (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with Musicology C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

Religion, Study of

RELIGN M108 – Qur’an
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sayeed, A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Arabic M106 – Qur’an
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M108 – Qur’an
Course Description: (Same as Arabic M106.) Lecture, three hours. How Qur’an as scripture shapes Muslim doctrine, rituals, and culture, and how throughout history Muslims have determined interpretations and applications of Qur’anic doctrines and prescriptions. Critical evaluation and analysis of contemporary discourses on Islam. Letter grading.

Russian

RUSSN 90A – Introduction to Russian Civilization
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to Russian culture and society from earliest times to 1917. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian

SCAND 40 – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40W. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including “Nibelungenlied,” “Volsunga saga,” “Eddas,” and “Beowulf.” Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. P/NP or letter grading.

SCAND 134 – Scandinavian Mythology
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Overview of major gods and goddesses, heroes and heroines, narratives and adventures that make up lore collectively referred to as Scandinavian, or Norse, myth. Reading and examination of this lore that is chiefly preserved in two collections traditionally called “Poetic (or Elder) Edda” and “Prose (or Younger) Edda.” P/NP or letter grading.

Spanish

SPAN 135 – Topics in Early Modern Studies: Colonial Latin American Literature: Characters Types and Literary Representation
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Rodriguez, J.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: course 25. Exploration of 16th and 17th centuries, with focus on early modern period of Spain and Spanish America. Possible topics include Spanish colonization and indigenous responses, transatlantic literary and visual baroque, race and religion in construction of early modern nation, transatlantic fictions, early modern identities and theatrical representations, literature and historiography, transatlantic poetics and poetry. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: First Europeans to arrive on American continent were group of conquerors, travelers, soldiers, missionaries, sailors, and wanderers who moved throughout New World as it was interpreted by those who just arrived, and as unknown world by those still living in old one. Following different character types–sailor, wanderer, conqueror, castaway, woman, captive, traitor, etc.–study of different literary representations of Latin American colonial world. Taught in Spanish.

Theater

THEATER C104E – History of Design Décor Part I: Architecture and Decor — Antiquity to Early Neoclassical
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Clement, S.R.; Cho, M.H.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisites: courses 14A, 14B, 14C. Study of pre-Renaissance architectural and interior decor as manifestation of cultural, social, economic, and political influences to provide historical framework for design of scenery, costumes, and lighting for theater, film, and television. May be repeated once for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C404E. Letter grading.