Undergraduate Courses

Fall 2017

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units 5
Instructor(s) Smoak, J.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading

Art History

ART HIS C115D – Gothic Art and Architecture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 105D.) Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of Europe in 13th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C215D. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 121C – Italian Renaissance Art of 16th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 106C.) Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of 16th century. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS C126 – Selected Topics in Early Modern Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Wilson, B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in early modern art that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. May be repeated twice for credit. Concurrently scheduled with course C226. P/NP or letter grading.

Clusters

CLUSTER 30A – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Watkins, S.J.; Burdorff, S.F.; Yokoyama, O.T.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Course 30A is enforced requisite to 30B, which is enforced requisite to 30CW. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration in depth of particular mythological traditions, aspects of storytelling, role of myth in culture, society, and/or art, and contributions of various disciplines to study of myth. Letter grading.

English

ENGL 10A – Literatures in English to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisites: English Composition 3 or 3H, English 4W or 4HW. Survey of major writers and genres, with emphasis on tools for literary analysis such as close reading, argumentation, historical and social context, and critical writing. Minimum of three papers (three to five pages each) or equivalent required. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Diskey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL M105A – Early Chicana/Chicano Literature, 1400 to 1920
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lopez, M.K.
Course Description: (Same as Chicana and Chicano Studies M105A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Survey of Chicana/Chicano literature from poetry of Triple Alliance and Aztec Empire through end of Mexican Revolution (1920), including oral and written forms (poetry, corridos, testimonios, folklore, novels, short stories, and drama) by writers such as Nezahualcoyotl (Hungry Coyote), Cabaza de Vaca, Lorenzo de Zavala, María Amparo Ruiz de Burton, Eusebio Chacón, Daniel Venegas, and Lorena Villegas de Magón. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 140B – Chaucer: “Troilus and Criseyde” and Selected Minor Works
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of “Troilus and Criseyde” and selected minor works of Chaucer, such as “Book of the Duchess,” “House of Fame,” “Parliament of Fowls,” etc. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 141 – Early Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Major poetry and prose of early medieval Britain, including epic, romance, history, saints’ lives, and travel literature. Texts and topics include “Beowulf,” Vikings, poems on women, Bede, and King Alfred. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 143 – Drama to 1576
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. English drama from its Latin and Anglo-Norman roots to opening of first public playhouse. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 145 – Medieval Literatures of Devotion and Dissent: Virgin, Wife, and Widow: Dissent and Dominance in Lives of Holy Women
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Exploration of devotional genres and their complex relationships with traditions of dissent in medieval English culture, encompassing hagiography, vision, conversion narrative, interreligious debate, heresy trials, and Lollard manifestos and translations. Texts may include “Dream of Rood,” “South English Legendary,” “Ancrene Wisse,” “Piers Plowman,” Lollard writings, macro-plays, Wakefield cycle, “Showings of Julian of Norwich,” and “Book of Margery Kempe.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Category of holy life offers space for thinking through relationship between church and holy women, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, rebellion and conformity. Ranging from lives of virgin-martyrs to those of runaway brides, chaste wives, and widows, focus on ways in which figure of holy woman as virgin, wife, or widow engaged norms of medieval church by rebelling against and at same time conforming to them. Close reading of lives (Vitae) of such women (and a few holy men) alongside legal documents, itineraries, property records, statutes, and other ecclesiastical documents on issues from virginity to marriage, travel to enclosure. Discussion topics include what constitutes femaleness or masculinity, when medieval notions of gender become consequential for saint-making, when gender is merely incidental, and how rebel and reactionary figures enable female hagiography in world otherwise hostile to women.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespeare and Legal Scene
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Cunningham, K.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: It is no news that Shakespeare’s plays include legal issues and trial scenes of all kinds: from The Merchant of Venice to The Winter’s Tale, from The Comedy of Errors to Measure for Measure, and (in imaginary form) in King Lear, thematic and dramatic possibilities of legal processes and equitable justice captured playwright’s imagination. Reading of selected plays in which various kinds of legal themes and scenes, including but not limited to trials, inform story Shakespeare tells. To understand relationship between Shakespearean law and contemporary culture, reading may include selected16-century texts dealing with legal theories, processes, and procedures. Includes midterm and final paper.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: Virgins and Viragos: Female Mystics of Late Medieval Church
Seminar: Sem 5
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Stories of holy women–hagiographical narratives–offer space for thinking through shifting relationship between church and holy woman, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and animals and saints. Study extends from travails of runaway bride Christina of Markyate to miraculous conversions of wolves and travels of Margery Kempe. Focus on narrative characteristics of late medieval hagiography and cultural work it does. Writings about and by holy women (and holy men) alongside relevant trial records, itineraries, maps, illustrations, and other institutional documents on issues ranging from virginity to marriage, travel to enclosure, writing to preaching. Discussion topics include what makes these narratives compelling, and to what extent formal conventions of storytelling help establish female agency in male-dominated world? Not open for credit to students enrolled in course 145 for fall 2017.

French

FRNCH 16 – Society And Self in Early Modern France
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Stefanovska, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Role of religion, politics, and sociability in constructing self and understanding its relation with society in early modern France. Development of students’ critical thought and knowledge of French and European intellectual tradition. P/NP or letter grading.

Gender Studies

GENDER M105A – Premodern Queer Literatures and Cultures
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gottlieb, C.M.
Course Description: (Same as English M101A and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Studies M101A.) Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Survey of discrete period of queer literature from beginning to circa 1850. Works by such writers as Sappho, Plato, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and Thomas Gray may be included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

German

GERMAN 231 – Gothic
Discussion: Dis 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Stevens, C.M.
Course Description: Discussion, three hours. Systematic study of phonology and grammar of Gothic language, with readings in Wulfila’s translation of Bible and introduction to history of Goths and their place in development of modern Europe. S/U or letter grading.

History

HIST 1A – Introduction to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa A.D. 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Phillips, C.D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century A.D. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 3A – History of Science: Renaissance to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Alexander, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of beginnings of physical sciences involving transformation from Aristotelian to Newtonian cosmology, mechanization of natural world, rise of experimental science, and origin of scientific societies. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 8A – Colonial Latin America
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Terraciano, K.B.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. General introduction to Latin American history from contact period to independence (1490s to 1820s), with emphasis on convergence of Native American, European, and African cultures in Latin America; issues of ethnicity and gender; development of colonial institutions and societies; and emergence of local and national identities. Readings focus on writings of Latin American men and women from the period studied. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 9D – Introduction to Asian Civilizations: History of Middle East
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gelvin, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Introduction to history of Muslim world from advent of Islam to present day. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 11A – History of China: To 1000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Von Glahn, R.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Survey of early history of China — genesis of characteristic Chinese institutions and modes of thought from antiquity to 1000. Focus on social, political, intellectual, and economic aspects of early and middle empires. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 21 – World History, circa 600 to 1760
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Outline of world history from rise of Islam to start of Industrial Revolution, structured around a broad chronological narrative of salient developments. Use of thematic and comparative approaches, with certain recurring themes and institutions that modulate from culture to culture. Reading of variety of contemporary accounts to look at way people perceived cultures outside their own. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sabean, D.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Study deals with different ways of thinking about and writing history. It takes off from consideration of two of most influential historians of popular culture, Natalie Z. Davis and Carlo Ginzburg, and examines debates about and criticisms of their work. Students also look at other forms of working with history in film and fiction, and consider different ways of using facts and constructing narratives. Examination of treatment of contingency in recent German film.

HIST 97C – Introduction to Historical Practice: Variable Topics in European History: Unsolved Mysteries of Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Discussion classes of no more than 15 students. Introduction to study of history, with emphasis on historical theory and research methods. Variable topics courses; consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Investigation of most intriguing mysteries of early-modern era in European history. Introduction to some sources, methods, and principles of historical research and writing. Study helps students develop their ability to read historical writing critically and to improve both oral and written presentation skills.

HIST 105A – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 500 to 1300
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 111B – Topics in Middle Eastern History: Early Modern
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Momdjian, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of Istanbul in Ottoman period (1453 to 1923); relationship between history and literary imagination and view of history as dialogue between past and present; scholarly debate on urban history of early-modern Middle East; introduction to corpus of theories (world economy paradigm) through discussion of Ottoman port cities. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 116A – Byzantine History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural continuity in millennial history of Byzantium. Reforms of Diocletian. Byzantium’s relations with Latin Europe, Slavs, Sassanids, Arabs, and Turks. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 119A – Medieval Europe, 400 to 1000
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Basic introduction to Western Europe from Latin antiquity to age of discovery, with emphasis on medieval use of Greco-Roman antiquity, history of manuscript book, and growth of literacy. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M127A – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
Course Description: (Same as Russian M118.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 136A – History of Britain: Tudor-Stuart Times, 1485 to 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Analysis of British economy, society, and polity, with focus on dynamics of both stability and change. Political, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural history of Britain under Tudors and Stuarts. Topics include Reformation, transformation of economy, establishment of overseas colonies, 17th-century political upheavals and their impact on political and socioeconomic structures. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 149A – North American Indian History, Precontact to 1830
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Madley, B.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. History of Native Americans from contact to present, with emphasis on historical dimensions of culture change, Indian political processes, and continuity of Native American cultures. Focus on selected Indian peoples in each period. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M186A – Women and Gender, Prehistory to 1792
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Cheung, R.Y.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M187A.) (Same as Gender Studies M186A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of history of women, gender, and sexuality from prehistory to 1792. First half deals with period before written history and asks when did gender appear? How and why did patriarchy develop? Topics include evolution of women’s bodies, appearance of gender, women’s contribution to Neolithic revolution, significance of Goddess artifacts, creation myths, and women and sexuality in different religions. Consideration of effects of European conquest on Mesoamerican women, women’s power in monarchies, gender dimensions of Atlantic slavery, and first manifestations of feminist consciousness in second half. Objects or texts created by women examined or read throughout. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 187B – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Medieval: Life, Death, and Human Body in Middle Ages
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Markman, K.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of perceptions of human body in context of medieval intellectual cultural. Exploration of importance of body in conception of self, attitudes toward physical appearance, pain, torture, sexuality, handling of corpses, cannibalism, and ghosts. Main objective is to familiarize students with skills of deconstructive historical analysis through examination of secondary literature. Students discuss current historiographical trends and learn to critically review and evaluate historical arguments.

HIST 187M – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar: Southeast Asia: Indian Ocean Travels, 1300 to 1800
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pirani, C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of writings of Europeans and Asians as they traveled through region known as Indian Ocean world (East Africa, Central Asia, India, Southeast Asia) during period known as age of exploration. Readings meant to show perspectives on people, things, and places in region. Students identify common and divergent descriptive approaches that travel writers have in order to identify their interests and sensibilities.

HIST 187N – Variable Topics Historiography Proseminar – India: Gunpowder Empires in Early Modern Islamic History: Mughals, Ottomans, and Safavids
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Proseminar on historiography involving close reading and critical discussion of secondary scholarship and primary sources on selected topics. Reading, discussion, and analytical writing culminating in one or several historiographical essays. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191B – Capstone Seminar: History — Medieval: Crime, Sin, and Law in Medieval Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191F – Capstone Seminar: History — Near East: Economic History: Late Antiquity to Early Islam
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Morony, M.G.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of processes of economic change from late antiquity to early Islamic period in western Asia and North Africa in terms of regional differences, mining, commercialization, monetization, labor, and consumption patterns.

Honors Collegium

HNRS 156 – Political Opposition in Early Modern Europe
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jacob, M.C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for College Honors students. Examination of tradition of radical political movements from Italian Renaissance to French Revolution. Topics include Machiavelli’s contributions to political thought, turmoil of 16th-century France and Dutch Republic and their radical underside of Protestant thought, French Wars of Religion, Dutch revolt against Spanish, English Civil Wars, and radical thought of European Enlightenment and its contributions to French Revolution. P/NP or letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN 110 – Dante in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Close study of one of world’s greatest literary geniuses, particularly of his masterpiece, “Divine Comedy,” the archetypal medieval journey through the afterworld. P/NP or letter grading.

ITALIAN 116A – Italian Renaissance: Renewal of Art and Thought
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Moudarres, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Study of Quattrocento and its representatives in arts and humanistic thought (i.e., Mantegna, Botticelli, Pico, Valla, and Ficino). P/NP or letter grading.

Music

MUSC 140A – History and Analysis of Western Music to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Steinmetz, J.A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Survey of Western music from its beginnings to 1700; examination of representative compositions within their cultural contexts and development of analytical methods appropriate to each repertory. Letter grading.

Music History

MSC HST CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Actvity: Act 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A.
Course Description: (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated for credit without limitation. May be concurrently scheduled with Musicology C490T. P/NP or letter grading.

MSC HST 125A – History of Western Music: Era of Church and Patron
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Upton, E.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6A (may be taken concurrently). Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of church and court patronage, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques. Letter grading.

Philosophy

PHILOS 19 – Genesis: Creation of World and Fall of Humanity
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Normore, C.G.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
Class Description: Study of key motifs found in book of Genesis: creation of world and fall of mankind. These are central to all Abrahamic religions, to efforts to integrate these religions with ancient philosophy, and to efforts to reinterpret them by thinkers such as Spinoza. Examination of accounts of Genesis story from Babylonian Genesis to Mormon Pearl of Great Price. Focus on debate about whether various texts entail that world was created, in time and out of nothing, by omnipotent being. Focus on story of fall of mankind, looking at how elements of it have been interpreted by such different writers as Anselm of Canterbury, Spinoza, and recently David Velleman.

PHILOS 107 – Topics in Medieval Philosophy: John Buridan and Nominalism in 14th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): The Staff
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Recommended requisite: course 105 or 106. Study of philosophy and theology of one medieval philosopher such as Augustine, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, or Ockham, or study of one single area such as logic or theory of knowledge in several medieval philosophers. Topic announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: John Buridan is undoubtedly one of most profound and influential thinkers of 14th century; his impact on late medieval and early modern philosophy is extensive, especially in logic and natural philosophy. Taking Buridan as focal point, examination of some features of 14th-century nominalism.

Study of Religion

RELIGN M109 – Introduction to Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: (Same as Islamic Studies M110.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Genesis of Islam, its doctrines, and practices, with readings from Qur’an and Hadith; schools of law and theology; piety and Sufism; reform and modernism. P/NP or letter grading.

Russian

RUSSN M118 – History of Russia, Origins to Rise of Muscovy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lenhoff, G.D.
Course Description: (Same as History M127A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Kievan Russia and its culture, Appanage principalities and towns; Mongol invasion; unification of Russian state by Muscovy, Autocracy and its Servitors; serfdom. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian

SCAND 165B – Vikings on Film
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Exploration of representations of Vikings in medium of film, considering Viking films within their historic and cultural contexts. How does representation of Vikings on film correspond to historical reality of Vikings? What have Vikings come to signify in modern era and why? Do we see development in idea of Vikings over time that is reflected in films from different periods? How do representations of Vikings in films produced in Scandinavia differ from their representations in films from other cultures? How do we see changing ideas about gender, ethnicity, dis/ability, sexual preference, and other aspects of identity reflected in Viking films? Development of critical thinking and close textual analysis skills. All readings and films in English or with English subtitles. P/NP or letter grading.