Undergraduate Courses

WINTER 2018

 

Ancient Near East

AN N EA 10W – Jerusalem: Holy City
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Schniedewind, W.M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 12W. Survey of religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as symbolic focus of three faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Transformation of sacred space as reflected by literary and archaeological evidence through examination of testimony of artifacts, architecture, and iconography in relation to written word. Study of creation of mythic Jerusalem through event and experience. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

AN N EA M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Bakhos, C.A.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Ancient Near East (AN N EA) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Course Description: (Same as Middle Eastern Studies M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

Arabic

ARABIC 130 – Classical Arabic Texts
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Cooperson, M.D.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 103C. Readings from premodern literary texts, with grammatical and syntactical analysis. May be repeated for credit. Letter grading.

ARABIC M155 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Slyomovics, S.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Arabic M155 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Comparative Literature (COM LIT) M119 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Course Description:(Same as Comparative Literature M119.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literature of Islamic Spain to learn about interaction of Arabic and Western and Arabic and Jewish cultures and to recognize Islamic culture as vital force in European life and letters. P/NP or letter grading.

Architecture and Urban Design

ARCH&UD 10A – History of Architecture and Urban Design: Prehistory to Mannerism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Fox, G.; Lavin, S.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; outside study, 11 hours. Exploration of developments in global architecture and urban design from prehistory to 1600 and critical reflection on terms such as building, architecture, city, history, and culture. Focus on world context, construction and technology, and history of architectural ideas. P/NP or letter grading.

Art History

ART HIS 21 – Medieval Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Gerstel, S.E.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 51.) Lecture, three hours; quiz, one hour. Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Carolingian, Ottoman, Romanesque, and Gothic art and architecture. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 29 – Chinese Art
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Lee, H.: Von Falkenhausen
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 56B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour; museum field trips. General introduction to Chinese art, covering all major periods from Neolithic to modern age. Presentation of monuments as well as artifacts in variety of media in their social and historical contexts. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Formerly numbered M104D.) (Same as Islamic Studies M111 and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Hans Holbein’s Living Paintings
Seminar: Sem 4
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Harwell, G.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 127.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Swiss Renaissance painter Hans Holbein, court painter to King Henry VIII of England, may have been first who consistently made paintings as lifelike as photographs. But there is more to life of his paintings than appearances. Students read in Pliny, Barthes, and Bätschmann; discuss how drawing relates to painting, photography, and psychology; and consider how Holbein represented bodies in space, and how he imbued portraits with virtual life-force.

ART HIS 185 – Undergraduate Seminar: Medieval Bestiary at Getty Museum
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Cohen, M.M.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered 127.) Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Selected aspects of art history explored through readings, discussion, research papers, and oral presentations. May be repeated twice for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: In Middle Ages, bestiary was very useful and popular secular book, not unlike encyclopedia, that described and gave anecdotes about both real and mythical animals. Many bestiaries have wonderful images of animals they detail, and these images were transposed onto other artistic media, particularly in sculpture. It is nearly impossible to understand animal imagery in Middle Ages without reference to what medieval people believed about them from these legendary bestiaries. Students learn about and conduct research for large upcoming exhibition on medieval bestiary at Getty Museum (Brentwood) scheduled for summer 2019. Study of individual objects that will constitute exhibition. Students produce extended blogpost/digital catalog entry for these objects. Includes visits by exhibition chief curator, and travel to Getty to see objects already collected for exhibition.

Asian

ASIAN M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Bodiford, W.M.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Asian M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M60W – Introduction to Buddhism
Course Description: (Same as Religion M60W.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course M60. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. General survey of Buddhist worldview and lifestyle, with focus on those religious doctrines and meditative practices most essential to various Asian traditions of Buddhism. Particular attention to problems involved in study of religion. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

ASIAN 162 – Buddhist Meditation Traditions
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Buswell, R.E.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Asian languages not required. Survey of theory and practice of meditation in Buddhism, with emphasis on Theravada and Zen schools. Topics include various typologies of meditation, symbiotic relationship between meditation and soteriology, and processes by which doctrinal innovation prompts changes in meditative praxis. Letter grading.

Classics

CLASSIC 19 – UCLA Centennial Initiative: Architecture–Famous Names, Forgotten People
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 1
Instructor(s): Gurval, R.A.
Course Description: Seminar, one hour. Discussion of and critical thinking about topics of current intellectual importance, taught by faculty members in their areas of expertise and illuminating many paths of discovery at UCLA. P/NP grading.
Class Description: Royce, Bunche, Haines, and Moore. Famous names on campus, but how many students (or even faculty and staff) know about people for whom these iconic buildings have been named? Introduction to history and architecture of Westwood campus through walking tour. Each class meets at different site (announced in syllabus) where students learn about named individuals and their important associations with UCLA. Many were among first professors on campus, forward-thinking administrators, or prominent alumni like Ralph Bunche (first African-American recipient of Nobel Peace Prize). Survey and examination of architecture and art of each building. Topics include building materials, architectural influences, and what rich decorative art (sculptural reliefs, frescoes, and mosaics)–or lack of it–tells us about ideologies and values of contemporary times.

Clusters

CLUSTER 30B – Never-Ending Stories: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Myth
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 6
Instructor(s): Watkins, S.J.; Burdorff, S.F.; Yokoyama, O.T.
Course Description: (Formerly numbered General Education Clusters 30B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: course 30A. Limited to first-year freshmen. Exploration in depth of particular mythological traditions, aspects of storytelling, role of myth in culture, society, and/or art, and contributions of various disciplines to study of myth. Letter grading.

Comparative Literature

COM LIT 2BW – Survey of Literature: Middle Ages to 17th Century
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Macfadyen, D.W.
Course Description: Lecture, two hours; discussion, two hours. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 1B or 4BW. Study of selected texts from Middle Ages to 17th century, with emphasis on literary analysis and expository writing. Texts may include works by authors such as Chaucer, Dante, Cervantes, Marguerite de Navarre, Shakespeare, Calderón, Molière, and Racine. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

COM LIT M119 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Slyomovics, S.E.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Arabic M155 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Comparative Literature (COM LIT) M119 – Al-Andalus: Literature of Islamic Spain
Course Description: (Same as Arabic M155.) Lecture, three hours. Study of literature of Islamic Spain to learn about interaction of Arabic and Western and Arabic and Jewish cultures and to recognize Islamic culture as vital force in European life and letters. P/NP or letter grading.

COM LIT 180 – Variable Topics: Medical Humanities in Comparative Contexts: Literary and Medical Conceptions of Body, Mind, and Soul in Classical and Early-Modern Literature and Science
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Ciavolella, M.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for juniors/seniors. Study and discussion of defined periods and approaches in medical humanities, giving pride of place to literary and cultural expressions in dialogue with other disciplines such as anthropology, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, or sociology. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for topics to be offered in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

English

ENGL 90 – Shakespeare
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: satisfaction of Entry-Level Writing requirement. Not open for credit to English majors or students with credit for course 150A or 150B. Survey of Shakespeare’s plays, including comedies, tragedies, and histories, selected to represent Shakespeare’s breadth, artistic progress, and total dramatic achievement. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 114 – Lyric Histories: Hamlet’s Lyric Histories
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Morphew, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H. Exploration of lyric poetry in English across centuries. Topics may include historical evolution of aesthetic forms, changing concepts of dramatic personae, matter of literary influence, and complex relationship of individual lyric speakers with their social and historical contexts. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Exploration of lyric histories of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, taking cue from Dane’s letter-poem to Ophelia in II.ii. Study leads to ancient Greek and Roman literature, Petrarch’s Canzoniere, English Renaissance sonnet sequences, and beyond. Students write two papers. Includes midterm and final exams.

ENGL 142 – Later Medieval Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Thomas, A.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 142R – Later Medieval Literature: Research Component: Rebels and Heretics: History of Late Medieval English Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Fisher, M.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Reading and historical explication of major writers of later medieval Britain (e.g., Gawain-poet, Langland, Gower, Margery Kempe, Malory, miracle and morality plays, prose, and lyrics). Substantial research component included. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Late medieval England was time of rebellion, revolution, and (small number of) heretics burned at stake. Reading springtime world of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, however, one would be hard pressed to know that medieval England was riven with divisions, and struggling with crises of class, gender, and religious identities. What, then, are histories that Medieval English literature creates and obscures? Students learn how to develop historical research questions, conduct research, and begin to answer those questions in literary critical papers. Significant time spent reading primary and secondary sources online and in YRL. Includes presentations of research-in-progress and final research paper.

ENGL 144 – Medieval Romance and Literatures of Court: Romance Intersections
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Chism, C.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Investigation of medieval court culture, exploring concepts of nobility, governance, love, loyalty, and power in range of genres: romance, courtly epic, lyric, debate, and satire. Texts may include “Beowulf,” “Lais of Marie de France,” “Sir Gawain and Green Knight,” “Pearl,” and Malory’s “Morte Arthure.” May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Gender and race are obsessive concerns in medieval romance, sparking invention of new literary forms to explore dynamics of subjectivity while raising their social and national stakes. Study addresses questions such as how romances treat women in culture of knightly careerism–as inspiration, obstacle, fellow, or alien; what intersections of race, ethnicity, upbringing, and religion beset interplay between familiar and strange, homeland and dizzy possibilities of larger worlds; and how such romance intersections inform and challenge literary and political world-building today. Texts may include Geoffrey of Monmouth’s History, The Mabinogi, Marie de France’s Lais, Silence; crusading romances such as Richard Coeur de Lion, The Sultan of Babylon, Parzival, and The Book of Saladin; and Saladin Ahmed’s Throne of the Crescent Moon. Students write two short papers, weekly response papers, and make optional class presentation.

ENGL 150A – Shakespeare: Poems and Early Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s):Watson, R.N.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of selected poems and representative comedies, histories, and tragedies through Hamlet. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150B – Shakespeare: Later Plays
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Intensive study of representative problem plays, major tragedies, Roman plays, and romances. P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 150C – Topics in Shakespeare: Shakespearean Tragicomedy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Braunmuller, A.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Introduction to or advancement of student knowledge of Shakespeare’s works through broad or specific topics set by instructor. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: From start of his career, Shakespeare’s plays displayed blending of tone and mixture of emotions that make them very attractive, but also puzzling and difficult to categorize (and hence difficult to evaluate). Consideration of some of his most generically puzzling plays, from Comedy of Errors to Winter’s Tale and The Tempest, with stops at Measure for Measure, Pericles, Romeo and Juliet, and others. Some exploration of generic theory, but emphasis on plays as theater. One prospectus and one 12- to 15-page research paper, and significant classroom contributions, required. Previous experience with Shakespeare’s works, or those of his contemporaries, on page or stage strongly advised.

ENGL 151 – Milton
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Mceachern, C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B. Study of major works of Milton, with emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” P/NP or letter grading.

ENGL 180 – Topics in Literature and Language: Introduction to Old English
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Stockwell, D.M.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Basic linguistic introduction to Old English with particular emphasis on structural differences between older language and modern English. Designed for students unfamiliar with earlier stages of this language. Offers basis for further study of linguistic, cultural, and literary heritage of English. Topics include description of various features of Old English and discussion/translation of Old English texts. Time dedicated to Anglo-Saxon verse: its structure, diction, and longevity. Includes two quizzes and presentation, including brief original composition in Old English. Not open to students who completed course 182A in fall 2012 with same title.

ENGL 182B – Topics in Renaissance and Early Modern Literature: Shakespeare’s Second Tetralogy
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Dickey, S.J.
Course Description: Seminar, three or four hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C. Consult “Schedule of Classes” for author, period, genre, or subject to be studied in specific term. May be repeated for credit with topic or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Detailed study of four works that make up Shakespeare’s second tetralogy of English history plays: Richard II, Henry IV parts 1 and 2, and Henry V. Students acquire some familiarity with Shakespeare’s chronicle sources and dramatic precedents; competing early modern historiographical models and methods; genre theory; performance theory; political situation and social concerns of England in late 1590s when plays were written (that is, not just early 1400s when plays are set); and needs of harried property manager. Students also sample some of many filmed treatments of these plays.

ENGL 184 – Capstone Seminar: English: From Ancient Epic to Medieval Romance
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Jager, E.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Enforced requisites: courses 10A, 10B, 10C, and completion of at least four upper division courses required for major. Limited to senior English or American Literature and Culture majors. Students use knowledge from prior coursework to address current topics in discipline and work with faculty members on focused topic of research. Culminating paper or project and class presentation required. May be repeated once for credit with topic or instructor change. Letter grading.
Class Description: Study of how ancient Mediterranean epic bequeathed to medieval European romance wide range of character types, narrative patterns, themes, and imagery about central human concerns (war, eros, justice, spirituality); community (city, kingdom, etc.); and personal journey or quest. Readings vary, typically drawn from the following: Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, Vergil’s Aeneid, Augustine’s Confessions, Beowulf, The Song of Roland, Chrétien de Troyes’ Lancelot, The Romance of the Rose, The Lais of Marie de France, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darthur. Includes substantial reading, weekly in-class reports, and one 10- to 12-page research essay adapted for presentation at concluding mini-conference. Enrollment by instructor consent. For application information, see English department website.

French

FRNCH 115 – Studies in Medieval French Culture and Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Carron, J.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Enforced requisite: course 5. Taught in French.
Study of medieval French culture and literature, including lyric poetry and narrative romance, history of medieval warfare, comedy, and class structures. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.

History

HIST 1A – Intro to Western Civilization: Ancient Civilizations, Prehistory to circa A.D. 843
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Goldberg, J.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of diverse cultures that shaped foundation of Western civilization to onset of 9th century A.D. Investigation of first civilizations in Near East and Egypt. Analysis of worlds of Greeks and Romans. Examination of ways in which western European societies created new syntheses through selective appropriation of Greek and Roman cultures and introduction of new cultural forms. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 1B – Introduction to Western Civilization: Circa 843 to circa 1715
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Introduction to history of the West and its connections to rest of world from 843 to 1715. Profound social, political, cultural, and intellectual changes that affected development of modern world. Topics covered include economic, social, and cultural aspects of feudal system; relationship between Church and empire; new religious movements (including the Reformation); formation of nation-states; relationship between Western Europe and non-European and non-Christian people and traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M10A – History of Africa to 1800
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Lydon, G.E.
Course Description: (Same as African American Studies M10A.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of development of African societies from earliest times to late 18th century. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 101 – Topics in World History: Asia in World History, circa 100 to 1800 C.E.
Lecture: Lec 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Pirani, C.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Examination of specific historical themes from world historical perspective. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: World historical survey with specific focus on Asian continent, primarily central and south Asia. Study charts history of region from first century until end of 18th century, period when European powers had not yet dominated large interior territories of region. Students use combination of textbooks and individual readings that note fluidity and scale of region. Students become acquainted with themes of formations of peoples and linguistic cultures, migratory patterns, formation and expansion of empires, and entry of Europeans into Asiatic region. Students also become familiar with Indo-Greeks, Genghis Khan, Mongols, Silk Road, Mughals, and others. Prior Asian history experience not required.

HIST 105B – Survey of Middle East, 500 to Present: 1300 to 1700
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Momdjian, M.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Background and circumstances of rise of Islam, creation of Islamic Empire, and its development. Rise of Dynastic Successor States and Modern Nation States. Social, intellectual, political, and economic development. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 119B – Medieval Europe, 1000 to 1500
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Markman, K.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Basic introduction to Western Europe from Latin antiquity to age of discovery, with emphasis on medieval use of Greco-Roman antiquity, history of manuscript book, and growth of literacy. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Course Description: (Same as Religion M174D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical introduction to Muslim communities of what eventually became nations of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include social, political, religious, and cultural history. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 176A – History of Southeast Asia to 1815
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Robinson, G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Political and cultural history of peoples of Southeast Asia from earliest times to about 1815. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 179B – History of Medicine: Foundations of Modern Medicine
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Zeleny, C.L.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Cultural, scientific, and social context that shaped modern medicine from Renaissance to Romantic era. Topics include establishment of anatomy, physiology, and modern clinical medicine, mapping of human body, medical approach to mental illness, rise of anatomo-clinical method at Paris School. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 180A – Topics in History of Science: Science and Religion from Copernicus to Darwinism
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Alexander, A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Topics may include science and colonialism, science and religion, environmental history, science in Enlightenment, development of theory of evolution, science and public policy, public nature of science. May be repeated for maximum of 16 units with topic and/or instructor change. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lustig, J.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Course Description: (Same as Jewish Studies M182B and Religion M182B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of unfolding of Jewish history from rise of Christianity to expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191A – Capstone Seminar: History — Ancient History: Fall of Rome: Late Antiquity in Transition and Crisis
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Langdon, J.S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191C – Capstone Seminar: History — Europe: English Reformation: Reading and Research
Seminar: Sem 3
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Mcclendon, M.C.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.

HIST 191K – Capstone Seminar: History — Religion: Muslims, Saints, and Social History
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Green, N.S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Stories of Muslim saints began to be written down in 11th century in what is now Iraq and Iran; in following centuries such writings spread as far as India, Indonesia, North Africa, and Central Asia. Through detailing interactions of Muslim holy men (and sometimes women) with people of all backgrounds, these hagiographical writings form some of most fascinating and diverse sources on Muslim social history in medieval and modern periods. From sultans and soldiers to poets, tribesmen, women, villagers, poor, and members of other religions, stories of saints allow access to concerns, conceptions, and operations of Muslim social life in many regions of world.

HIST 191O – Capstone Seminar: History — World History: Religion in Early Modern Europe and European Empires
Seminar: Sem 2
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Designed for seniors. Limited to 15 students meeting with faculty member. Organized on topics basis with reading, discussion, and development of culminating project. May be repeated once for credit. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Examination of conceptual debates and empirical studies of past generation regarding religion in Europe and European overseas empires of period from 1500 to 1800. Examination of readings organized in broad but not strict chronological sequence, beginning with conflicts in Iberian peninsula around 1500, through Reformation and Catholic renewal, and ending with Enlightenment. Initial focus largely on Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, study also examines European perceptions of non-European religions.

Iranian

IRANIAN 150A – Survey of Persian Literature in English
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Ingenito, D.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours. Knowledge of Persian not required. May be taken independently for credit.

Islamic Studies

ISLM ST M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Formerly numbered Islamics M111.) (Same as Art History M119C and Middle Eastern Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

Italian

ITALIAN M158 – Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Italian Culture
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Re, L.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Gender Studies (GENDER) M158 – Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Italian Culture
Italian M158 – Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Italian Culture
Course Description: (Same as Gender Studies M158.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Analysis of gender roles, images of femininity and masculinity, patriarchy, myths of Madonna and Latin lover, condition of women in Italian society through history, politics, literature, film, and other media. Italian majors required to read texts in Italian. P/NP or letter grading.

Jewish Studies

JEWISH M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lustig, J.B.This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Course Description: (Same as History M182B and Religion M182B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of unfolding of Jewish history from rise of Christianity to expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. P/NP or letter grading.

Middle Eastern Studies

M E STD M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Multiple-Listed Class:
This is a multiple-listed class:
Ancient Near East (AN N EA) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M50B – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Course Description: (Same as Ancient Near East M50B and Religion M50.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

M E STD M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Burke, K.S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Art History (ART HIS) M119C – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Islamic Studies (ISLM ST) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Middle Eastern Studies (M E STD) M111 – Introduction to Islamic Archaeology
Course Description: (Same as Art History M119C and Islamic Studies M111.) Lecture, three hours. From earliest monuments of Islam in Arabia and Jerusalem to humble remains of small Egyptian port, broad focus on archaeological and standing remains in central Islamic lands (primarily Syria, Egypt, and Iraq), Turkey, Iran, North Africa, and Spain. Profound cultural transformations occurred from birth of Islam in 7th century to early Ottoman period in 16th and 17th centuries, which are traceable in material records. Assessment of effectiveness of tools afforded by historical archaeology to aid understanding of past societies. P/NP or letter grading.

Music History

MSC HST 66 – Getting Medieval
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Upton, E.R.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Exploration of idea of medievalism in music and culture from Wagner to video games. Music covered includes film scores, opera, Gregorian chant, early music revival, folk songs, progressive rock, and Goth. Credit for both courses 66 and 166 not allowed. Letter grading.

MSC HST CM90T – Early Music Ensemble
Actvity: Act 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Koons, R.A.
Course Description: (Same as Music M90T.) Activity, four hours. Preparation: audition. Group performance of Western vocal and instrumental music from historical periods prior to 1800. Early instruments may be used at instructor’s discretion.

MSC HST 125B – History of Western Music: Era of Empires and Marketplaces
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Le Guin, E.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course M6B (may be taken oncurrently), 125A. Course 125A is requisite to 125B, which is requisite to 125C. Students must receive grade of C or better to proceed to next course in sequence. Introduction to history, culture, and structure of Western music, in era of empires and marketplaces, through selected topics, repertoires, and analytical techniques. Letter grading.

MSC HST 166 – Medievalism and Music History
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): TBA
Course Description: Seminar, two hours. Enforced corequisite: attendance, but not enrollment, in course 66 lecture. Exploration of ways in which specific approaches and attitudes to past shape music history, composition, and performance, with special focus on folk music and early music revivals. Credit for both courses 66 and 166 not allowed. Letter grading.

Philosophy

PHILOS 100B – Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Normore, C.G.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Preparation: one philosophy course. Strongly recommended requisite: course 100A. Survey of development and transformation of Greek metaphysics and epistemology within context of philosophical theology, and transition from medieval to early modern period. Special emphasis on Augustine, Anselm, Aquinas, and Descartes. P/NP or letter grading.

PHILOS C109 – Descartes
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4.0
Instructor(s): Carriero, J.P.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisites: course 21 or two philosophy courses. Study of works of Descartes, with discussion of issues such as problem of skepticism, foundations of knowledge, existence of God, relation between mind and body, and connection between science and metaphysics. May be concurrently scheduled with course C209. P/NP or letter grading.

Religion, Study of

RELIGN M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Slavic M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity — Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGION M50 – Origins of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5.0
Instructor(s): Bakhos, C.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Examination of three major monotheisms of Western cultures — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — historically and comparatively. Development, teachings, and ritual practices of each tradition up to and including medieval period. Composition and development of various sacred texts, highlighting key themes and ideas within different historical and literary strata of traditions, such as mechanisms of revelation, struggle for religious authority, and common theological issues such as origin of evil and status of nonbelievers. Letter grading.

RELIGN M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Subrahmanyam, S.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M174D – Indo-Islamic Interactions, 700 to 1750
Course Description: (Same as History M174D.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Historical introduction to Muslim communities of what eventually became nations of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Topics include social, political, religious, and cultural history. P/NP or letter grading.

RELIGN 177 – Variable Topics in Religion: Exploring Islam
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Sadeghi, B.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Interdisciplinary approach to some major topics in study of religion, such as religion and science, religion and society, politics, mysticism, ideas of revelation, scripture, myth and religion, worship and ritual. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Introduction to some of most important features of Islamic religious tradition. Exploration of different ways in which Muslims have interpreted and practiced their religion. Main subjects of discussion–including life of Prophet Muhammad, Qur’an, law, ritual, mysticism, theology, politics, and art–considered with reference to their proper historical contexts. Topics covered include abortion, gender, rebellion and violence, and visual vocabulary of Islamic paintings. Students exposed to important theories and methods in academic study of religion. No prior knowledge of Islam required.

RELIGN M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Lustig, J.B.
This is a multiple-listed class:
History (HIST) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Jewish Studies (JEWISH) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M182B – Medieval Jewish History
Course Description: (Same as History M182B and Jewish Studies M182B.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour (when scheduled). Designed for juniors/seniors. Exploration of unfolding of Jewish history from rise of Christianity to expulsion of Jews from Spain in 1492. P/NP or letter grading.

Scandinavian

SCAND 40W – Heroic Journey in Northern Myth, Legend, and Epic
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Enforced requisite: English Composition 3 or 3H or English as a Second Language 36. Not open for credit to students with credit for course 40. All readings in English. Comparison of journeys of heroes. Readings in mythology, legend, folktale, and epic, including “Nibelungenlied,” “Volsunga saga,” “Eddas,” and “Beowulf.” Cultural and historic backgrounds to texts. Satisfies Writing II requirement. Letter grading.

SCAND 172A – Nordic Folk and Fairy Tales
Seminar: Sem 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Ball, K.A.
Course Description: Seminar, three hours. Exploration of Nordic version of classic tale-types such as Dragon Slayer, Cinderella, Hansel and Gretel, and King Lindorm in historic and cultural contexts. Reading of important works of Nordic and international folktale scholarship, representing historical-geographic, structuralist, psychological, feminist, disability-theory, and queer-theory approaches. Development of critical thinking and close textual analysis skills, and understanding and appreciation of genre that continues to pervade popular culture. Readings in English translation. P/NP or letter grading.

Slavic

SLAVC M40 – Christianities East and West
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 5
Instructor(s): Vroon, R.W.
This is a multiple-listed class:
Religion, Study of (RELIGN) M40 – Christianities East and West
Slavic (SLAVC) M40 – Christianities East and West
Course Description: (Same as Religion M40.) Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Survey of three major historical branches of Christianity — Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and Protestantism, contrasting how history, dogma, culture, and community structures develop in those three traditions. P/NP or letter grading.

Spanish

SPAN 120 – History of Literature
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s): Torrecilla, J.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours; discussion, one hour. Requisite: course 25 or 27. Introduction to different ways of looking at literary works as historical phenomena. Presentation of major models for writing history–great narratives, cyclic, teleological, sacred, and profane conceptions. Traditional concepts of literary history and problems of mixed categories (historical epochs versus epochs of style, national history, and world literature). P/NP or letter grading.

SPAN 130 – Topics in Medieval Studies: Three Medieval Masterpieces
Lecture: Lec 1
Units: 4
Instructor(s):Dagenais, J.C.
Course Description: Lecture, four hours. Requisite: course 25. Exploration of medieval Iberian literatures: lyric poetry, prose, and history of peninsula, with emphasis on its literary and linguistic diversity. Possible topics include “Convivencia” (peaceful coexistence), Europe and Orient, beginnings of Inquisition, oral versus written traditions, origins of Hispano-Christian expansion beyond peninsula, and flowering of Al-Andalus. May be repeated for credit with topic change. P/NP or letter grading.
Class Description: Students read and understand three undisputed masterworks of medieval Spanish literature: Don Juan Manuel’s Conde Lucanor (delightful collection of folk tales and fables from both European and Oriental sources); Juan Ruiz’s Libro de buen amor (disastrous love adventures of rural archpriest, in verse); and Fernando de Rojas’s Celestina of 1499 (dark drama of lust, sorcery, and murder, set against new urban backdrop of Inquisition and Spain’s nascent empire). First two works read in modern Spanish translation; final work, whose language is closer to modern Spanish, read in original, in edition with ample notes.