Graduate Courses

WINTER 2017

Arabic

ARABIC 220 – Seminar: Islamic Texts
Instructor(s): The Staff
Seminar, three hours. Major Islamic thinkers and their works from classical period to modern times. Coverage of doctrines and hermeneutics of various schools of thought in Islam, such as Ahl al-sunna wa’l-jama’a, Shi’a, Mu’tazila, and Sufis. May be organized around one author and his works, multiple authors and their works, or specific topic with representative readings from various schools. Exploration of secondary literature in Arabic and other languages for student research papers. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

Architecture and Urban Design

ARCH&UD 496 – Special Projects in Architecture
Instructor:  Favro, D.G.
Tutorial, to be arranged. Projects initiated either by individual students or student teams and directed by faculty member. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading. Units:  2-8

Art History

ART HIS C215D – Gothic Art and Architecture
Instructor: Cohen, M.M.
Lecture, three hours. Art and architecture of Europe in 13th century. Concurrently scheduled with course C115D. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C216A – Middle Byzantine Art and Architecture
Instructor: Gerstel, S.E.
Lecture, three hours. Requisite: course 21. Theory and development of Byzantine art from iconoclastic controversy to 1204. Concurrently scheduled with course C116A. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

ART HIS C217B – Selected Topics in Medieval Art: Medieval Sicily
Instructors:  Gerstel, S.E.
Lecture, three hours. Throughout history, the art and architecture of Sicily has been influenced by the island’s location at the center of the Mediterranean. Although the island’s fertile soil supported a long-term, stable agrarian economy, Sicily also benefited economically, culturally, and politically in the Middle Ages from its position as an important station on trade routes between Europe and Africa, Byzantium and the West. Because of its location, but also because of its layered history, the island boasted a population that was ethnically, linguistically, and religiously diverse. Conditions both external and internal to the island thus had an impact on the creation of art and architecture and on the circulation of goods, both at the elite and household level. The splendid monuments of the Kingdom of Sicily, founded by Roger II, demonstrate how, under the patronage of specific rulers and the sponsorship of members of their court, the island’s diverse cultural strands could be interwoven to create unique works of art and architecture. These works, as we shall see, were intended to manifest connections with cultures located far from the island kingdom. Analysis of the works also provides insights into the make-up of the island’s cosmopolitan culture. In this seminar, we will untangle the Islamic, Romanesque, and Byzantine strands that characterize Norman art and architecture in Sicily. We will also consider how the region’s incomparable ecclesiastical mosaics contributed to the modern understanding of medieval cultures. Concurrently scheduled with course C117B. S/U or letter grading. Units:  4

ART HIS C217B – Selected Topics in Medieval Art: Digital Gothic
Instructors:  Cohen, M.M.
Lecture, three hours. Variable topics in medieval art that reflect interests of individual regular and/or visiting faculty members. Concurrently scheduled with course C117B. S/U or letter grading. Units:  4

Asian Languages and Culture

CHIN 200B – Proseminar:  Premodern Chinese Literature
Instructor:  Strassberg, R.E.
Seminar, three hours. Introduction to major bibliographical and methodological resources in field of premodern Chinese literature, with focus on research tools in field and on scholarship in English on major literary genres, periods, and authors. Letter grading. Units:  4

JAPAN C260 – Japanese Buddhism
Instructor:  Bodiford, W.M.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course CM160. Letter grading. Units:  4

KOREA 265B – Seminar:  Korean Buddhist Texts
Instructor:  Buswell, R.E.
Seminar, three hours. Selected topics in Korean Buddhist texts. Coverage varies. Letter grading. Units:  4

Classics

CLASSIC M218 – Paleography of British Manuscripts, 900- 1500
(Same as Classics M218, French M210, and History M218.)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours.
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
This class will train students in the codicology and paleography of manuscripts produced in Britain from the earliest writings that survive to the beginning of the print-culture world. The seminar will address the challenges of reading medieval texts without the support of modern critical editions. In particular, we will seek how to put the empirical aspects of paleography and codicology – describing and dating old books – in the service of critical arguments about texts. That is, we will work to bridge old-school “book history” and current trends in “the history of the book.” Part of this conversation will necessarily consider the role of technology in the study of medieval texts and books. The seminar will meet twice per week. One meeting each week will be held in UCLA’s Special Collections, working hands-on with UCLA’s remarkable and teaching-focused collection of medieval manuscripts, leaves, and fragments.
Units:  4

Comparative Literature

COM LIT 220 – Topics in Medieval Studies
Instructor: Stahuljak, Z.
(Same as FRNCH 215) Seminar, four hours. Preparation: reading knowledge of one appropriate foreign language. Examination of nature of cross-cultural, cross-linguistic, and cross-confessional exchange in known medieval worlds of Europe, Asia, and Africa, with focus on communication and translation. Drawing on literary, social, cultural, economic, art history, and manuscript studies to trace formation of discourses produced by diverse encounters. Choice of bilingual texts. May be repeated for credit with topic change. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

English

ENGL M215 – Paleography of British Manuscripts, 900- 1500
(Same as Classics M218, French M210, and History M218.)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours.
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
This class will train students in the codicology and paleography of manuscripts produced in Britain from the earliest writings that survive to the beginning of the print-culture world. The seminar will address the challenges of reading medieval texts without the support of modern critical editions. In particular, we will seek how to put the empirical aspects of paleography and codicology – describing and dating old books – in the service of critical arguments about texts. That is, we will work to bridge old-school “book history” and current trends in “the history of the book.” Part of this conversation will necessarily consider the role of technology in the study of medieval texts and books. The seminar will meet twice per week. One meeting each week will be held in UCLA’s Special Collections, working hands-on with UCLA’s remarkable and teaching-focused collection of medieval manuscripts, leaves, and fragments.
Units:  4

ENGL 246 – Renaissance Literature
Instructor: McEachern, C.
Lecture, four hours. Studies in poetry and prose of Renaissance English literature, exclusive of Shakespeare; limits of investigation set by individual instructor. May be repeated for credit. S/U or letter grading.
What does it mean to “read for” religious identity (or any other kind) in the literature of early modern England — arguably the most critical moment in the history of modern belief formation? This course will consider a variety of authors and genres  — e.g., Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert — in the contested contexts of Reformation culture.  We will read and discuss with an eye to informing ourselves about the intellectual and political issues of the turn of the Tudor-Stuart century (1580s-1610s), treating with such matters as the effects of confessional difference upon aesthetic production; narratives of disenchantment; or the relation between theological and material practices of worship. Of equal concern will be how transcendental matters manifest (or don’t) in the poetry and plays under consideration –i.e. are some genres or poetics more amenable to being read for religion than others? — as well as the relation of religious belief to what it is we do when we believe in a play or a poem (or, in Coleridge’s famous phrase, “the willing suspension of disbelief”). This course can be taken as the second part of a two-term sequence with Professor Shuger’s course in the fall term, though the latter is not a prerequisite for this one.  I imagine it will be of particular interest to students interested in the history of belief, or in brushing up their Reformation, or in a promiscuous selection of Renaissance writers and genres considered through the lens of supernatural concerns. Units: 4

French

FRNCH 210 – Paleography of British Manuscripts, 900- 1500
(Same as Classics M218, French M210, and History M218.)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours.
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
This class will train students in the codicology and paleography of manuscripts produced in Britain from the earliest writings that survive to the beginning of the print-culture world. The seminar will address the challenges of reading medieval texts without the support of modern critical editions. In particular, we will seek how to put the empirical aspects of paleography and codicology – describing and dating old books – in the service of critical arguments about texts. That is, we will work to bridge old-school “book history” and current trends in “the history of the book.” Part of this conversation will necessarily consider the role of technology in the study of medieval texts and books. The seminar will meet twice per week. One meeting each week will be held in UCLA’s Special Collections, working hands-on with UCLA’s remarkable and teaching-focused collection of medieval manuscripts, leaves, and fragments.
Units:  4

FRNCH 215 – Studies in Middle Ages
Instructor: Stahuljak, Z.
(Same as COM LIT 220) Seminar, three hours. Examination of nature of cross-cultural, crosslinguistic, and cross-confessional exchange in medieval and early modern periods and France’s role in it. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

German

GERMAN 202B  – Readings in Middle High German Literature
Instructor: Schultz, J.A.
Lecture, three hours. Introduction to medieval German literature and literary history and to use of contemporary theory in study of medieval texts. Continued practice in reading Middle High German, although most texts to be read in modern translation. Letter grading. units: 4

History

HIST 201D – Topics in History: Early Modern Europe
Instructor:Tutino, S.
Seminar, three hours. Graduate course involving reading, lecturing, and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated for credit. When concurrently scheduled with course 191, undergraduates must obtain consent of instructor to enroll. S/U or letter grading.Units: 4

HIST M218 – Paleography of British Manuscripts, 900- 1500
(Same as Classics M218, French M210, and History M218.)
Lecture, three hours; discussion, two hours.
Instructor: Fisher, M.N.
This class will train students in the codicology and paleography of manuscripts produced in Britain from the earliest writings that survive to the beginning of the print-culture world. The seminar will address the challenges of reading medieval texts without the support of modern critical editions. In particular, we will seek how to put the empirical aspects of paleography and codicology – describing and dating old books – in the service of critical arguments about texts. That is, we will work to bridge old-school “book history” and current trends in “the history of the book.” Part of this conversation will necessarily consider the role of technology in the study of medieval texts and books. The seminar will meet twice per week. One meeting each week will be held in UCLA’s Special Collections, working hands-on with UCLA’s remarkable and teaching-focused collection of medieval manuscripts, leaves, and fragments.
Units:  4

Indo-European Studies

I E STD 200 – Proseminar: Indo-European Studies
Instructor: Vine, B.H.
Seminar, two hours every other week. Required of graduate Indo-European studies students during first year. Introduction to graduate-level research in Indo-European studies. S/U grading. Units: 2

I E STD 280A – Seminar: Indo-European Linguistics
Instructor: Vine, B.H.
Seminar, three hours. Requisite: course 210. Selected topics in Indo-European comparative grammar for advanced graduate students. S/U or letter grading. Study covers elements of Armenian synchronic and historical/comparative grammar. Also covers old and new Phrygian, relationship of Phrygian to Greek (and Armenian), and its position within Indo-European languages. Units: 4

Italian

ITALIAN 216E – Studies in the Renaissance: Variable Topics
Instructor(s): The Staff
Lecture, three hours. Variable-content seminar on themes and issues of Renaissance literature, with coverage of authors such as Vasari, Leonardo, or Benvenuto. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

Japanese

JAPAN C260 – Japanese Buddhism
Instructor(s): Bodiford, W.M.
Lecture, three hours; discussion, one hour. Knowledge of Japanese not required. Development of Buddhism in Japan in its cultural context, with emphasis on key ideas and teachings. Concurrently scheduled with course CM160. Letter grading. Units: 4

Philosophy

PHILOS 206 – Topics in Medieval Philosophy: Intentionality and Skepticism in Aristotelian Tradition
Instructor(s): The Staff
Lecture, four hours. Study of philosophy and theology of one or several medieval philosophers such as Augustine, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, or Ockham or study of single area such as logic or theory of knowledge in several medieval philosophers. Topics announced each term. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. S/U or letter grading.
Examination of concepts of intentionality and skepticism as they came up in broadly Aristotelian philosophical tradition in Western Europe. As concepts are developed in this tradition they appear closely related. This is largely because concept of intentionality–or historical concept of intentionality–is foremost about how mind acquirers content. Generally taken for granted in this tradition that mind has content. Units: 4

Political Science

POL SCI 210B – Introduction to Political Theory: Early Modern Period from Machiavelli through the Enlightenment
Instructor: Sissa, G
Lecture, three hours. Exploration of major texts and issues in political theory. Units: 4

Russian

RUSSN 204 – Introduction to History of Russian Literary Language
Instructor: Kresin, S.C.
Lecture, three hours. Requisites: course 220A, Slavic 201. Required for M.A. (linguistics) and Ph.D. (literature). Evolution of literary Russian from 11th to 20th century. Analysis of texts. S/U or letter grading. Units: 4

Scandinavian

SCAND C271 – Introduction to Scandinavian Folklore
Instructor: Tangherlini, T.R.
Seminar, three hours. Preparation: advanced knowledge of one modern Scandinavian language. Introduction to fairy tales and legends of Scandinavian tradition as well as to interpretive methodologies that strive to answer question why do people tell stories that they tell? Concurrently scheduled with course C171. Letter grading. Units: 4

Spanish

SPAN 221 – Medieval Lyric Poetry
Instructor: Dagenais, J.C.
Lecture, three hours. Readings of and lectures on Spanish lyric poetry from the beginning to 1500. Units: 4

SPAN 225 – Drama of the Golden Age
Instructor: Fuchs, B
Lecture, three hours. Readings of and lectures on the comedia. Units: 4

SPAN 296 – Graduate Research Group: Reading Hebrew Aljamiado Texts
Instructor: Dagenais, J.C.
Research group meeting, two hours. Limited to graduate students. Designed to bring together graduate students in seminar setting with one or more faculty members to discuss and critique individual research projects, especially dissertation research. S/U grading. Units: 2