UCLA Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies
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Associates

CMRS Associates are scholars holding a Ph.D. or the equivalent who specialize in some aspect of Medieval and Renaissance Studies. To be granted associate status, a scholar must be nominated by a CMRS faculty member and approved by the Center’s Faculty Advisory Committee. Most CMRS Associates hold academic positions at other local educational institutions or research facilities, or are established independent scholars.

  • Sara M. Adler (Italian, Scripps College): Vittoria Colonna; women poets of the Italian Renaissance.
  • Susana Hernández Araico (English and Foreign Languages, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona): Early Modern Hispanic Literature, especially political power, sexuality and music in Theatre Cervantes, Quevedo, Lope de Vega, Vélez de Guevara, Rojas Zorrilla, Calderón, Sor Juana and Llamosas); commercial, street and court theatre in Spain: tragicomedias, autos sacramentales, chivalry masques, mythological spectacles; secular and religious pieces in 17th-century Spanish viceroyalties of New Spain and Peru.
  • Damian Bacich (San Jose State University): Ibero-American Colonial Literatures and Cultures, Transatlantic Humanism and Neoplatonism.
  • Susannah F. Baxendale: Social and political history in Renaissance Italy; family and women's issues; early business history.
  • Lisa M. Bitel (History, University of Southern California): Early medieval culture and society; Ireland; women and gender.
  • Matthew Brosamer (English, Mount St. Mary's College): Chaucer, Old English literature, church history, monastic theology, the seven deadly sins.
  • Cynthia Brown (French, UC Santa Barbara): Late medieval and early Renaissance French literature and culture; text editing; history of the book.
  • Warren C. Brown (History, California Institute of Technology): Early and Central Middle Ages; conflict resolution; history of power; history of writing.
  • Gayle K. Brunelle (History, California State University, Fullerton): Early modern commerce, merchants, women and wealth, and the Atlantic world.
  • Silvia Orvietani Busch (Associate Director, The UCLA Foundation): Medieval Mediterranean history, archaeology, ports; Mediterranean navigation; maritime history.
  • Michael Calabrese (English, California State University, Los Angeles): Medieval English literature (Chaucer, Langland); medieval amatory tradition (Ovid, Boccaccio); medieval masculinity.
  • José Cartagena-Calderón (Romance Languages and Literature, Pomona College): Medieval and early modern Spanish literature.
  • Brian A. Catlos (UC Santa Cruz): Medieval Iberia and Europe; Islamic world; Pre-modern Mediterranean; social and economic history; ethnicity and religious identity; Muslim-Christian-Jewish relations.
  • Rafael Chabrán (Modern Languages, Whittier College): Life and works of Francisco Hernández; Cervantes and medicine; history of science and medicine in sixteenth-and seventeenth-century Spain and Mexico.
  • Paul E. Chevedden: Medieval Mediterranean history; Crusades; medieval artillery; early photography of the Middle East.
  • Stanley Chodorow (History, UC San Diego): Legal history; canon law; church and state.
  • Luisa Del Giudice: Ethnology; Italian and Italian diaspora culture and oral history.
  • Gail Feigenbaum (Associate Director, The Getty Research Institute): Baroque art; religious art.
  • Andrew Fleck (English, San Jose State University): The Dutch in English national identity.
  • Carme Font Paz (English, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain): Late medieval–early modern women’s writing, especially poetry and prose. Theoretical considerations of the early modern women writers’ canon. Prophetic speech in a post-reformation context; medieval herbals and lapidaries in the Mediterranean. Selected publications: Antología de poetisas del Renacimiento inglés. Ediciones Cátedra (2014); The Spoon and the Pen: Economic Imperatives for Women’s Writing in Europe Before 1800, Co-edited with Nina Geerdink. Rodopi Press (2014).
  • John Geerken (Emeritus, History, Scripps College): Italian Renaissance; Machiavelli; European intellectual history; history of legal thought.
  • James Given (History, UC Irvine): Medieval social and political history; heresy and inquisition in Languedoc; social and political conflict.
  • Joe Gonzalez (Liberal Studies, CSU Fullerton): Late medieval and Renaissance Scandinavia and Europe; cultural and intellectual history; ritual studies.
  • Piotr S. Górecki (History, UC Riverside): Early and central Middle Ages; Poland and east-central Europe; legal history in a social context; relationship between communities and judicial institutions.
  • George L. Gorse (Art History, Pomona College): Art history of the Middle Ages and Renaissance; urban space and artistic patronage in Renaissance Italy.
  • Lawrence D. Green (English, University of Southern California): the Renaissance; rhetoric; linguistics.
  • Maryanne Cline Horowitz (History, Occidental College): Age of Renaissance & Encounter; humanists and mapmakers; visual cues to collections; the mind as a garden; Stoicism; Skepticism, and toleration; cultural history of ideas.
  • Patrick Hunt (Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford University): Late Antiquity through Renaissance.
  • C. Stephen Jaeger (Emeritus, German, Comparative Literature, and Program in Medieval Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign): German and Latin literature of the Middle Ages.
  • Jennifer Jahner (Caltech): Late medieval literature; law; poetics; multilingualism; manuscript study; gender; histories of medievalist scholarship and the reception of the Middle Ages.
  • Leslie Ellen Jones: Medieval Welsh literature and history; British and Celtic folklore and mythology; Arthuriana; film and folklore.
  • Constance Jordan (Emerita, English, Claremont Graduate University): Comparative literature; Shakespeare; history of political thought.
  • Sharon D. King: Medieval and Renaissance drama; early cookbooks; women's studies; French wars of religion; military strategy; proto-science fiction; early modern Protestant mysticism.
  • Sharon Kinoshita (UC Santa Cruz): Medieval Mediterranean Studies; medieval French and comparative/world literatures; postcolonial medievalisms; Marco Polo.
  • Scott Kleinman (English, California State University, Northridge): Medieval English historiography and regional culture; medieval English romance; Old and Middle English philology.
  • Aaron J. Kleist (Associate Professor of English, Biola University): Old English and Anglo-Latin literature; Ælfric; Anglo-Saxon homilectics; Anglo-Saxon and Patristic theology; digital manuscript editing.
  • Leonard Michael Koff: Use of the Bible in literature; medieval literature; literature of medieval and Renaissance courts; Chaucer; Gower; Ricardian literary associations; Trecento literary connections; postmodern theory and the pre-modern text.
  • Thomas Kren (Associate Director for Collections, J. Paul Getty Museum): Medieval and Renaissance manuscript illumination; late medieval Netherlandish painting.
  • John S. Langdon (Emeritus Head, History and Social Sciences, The Marlborough School, Los Angeles; Continuing Lecturer, UCLA): The Basileia of John III Ducas Vatatzes; Late Roman and Byzantine emperors as warriors: Byzantine Imperial consorts and princesses of the Anatolian Exile.
  • Leena Löfstedt (University of Helsinki): Old French and Middle French philology.
  • Joyce Pellerano Ludmer: Critical art history and secondary sources; small presses and artists' books; Leonardo da Vinci; Renaissance and Baroque art history.
  • Peter C. Mancall (History, University of Southern California): Early modern Atlantic world; early America; native America.
  • Elizabeth Morrison (Senior Curator of Manuscripts, J. Paul Getty Museum): Medieval French secular manuscript illumination; bestiaries; Flemish Renaissance manuscripts; social and historical context of manuscripts.
  • Michael O'Connell (English, UC Santa Barbara): Renaissance literature; medieval and Renaissance drama; Shakespeare; Spenser; Milton.
  • Roberta Panzanelli: Medieval and Renaissance art history; northern Italian art; religious art.
  • Alison Perchuk (Art History, CSU Channel Islands): Visual arts, architecture, and monasticism in Italy and the Mediterranean basin, ca. 800-1200.
  • Mary Elizabeth Perry (Emerita, History, Occidental College): History of marginal people and minorities, deviance, and disorder in early modern Spain; women's history.
  • Ricardo Quinones (Professor Emeritus, Comparative Literature, Claremont McKenna College): Renaissance comparative literature; modernism; Dante; Shakespeare; history of ideas (Time); thematics (Cain and Abel); literary dualism.
  • Mary L. Robertson (William A. Moffett Curator of Medieval & British Historical Manuscripts, The Huntington Library): Early Modern English politics and government; English archives.
  • Mary Rouse (Retired, former Viator editor, CMRS, UCLA): Medieval manuscripts; history of medieval Paris.
  • Marilyn Schmitt: Medieval art, Romanesque sculpture.
  • Christine Petra Sellin (Associate Professor of Art History, California Lutheran University): Religious art, literature, and narrative imagination of the early modern Netherlands.
  • Stephen H. A. Shepherd (English, Loyola Marymount University): Middle English Romance; Malory; Langland; textual criticism; late medieval manuscripts in their material and social contexts.
  • Cynthia Skenazi (French and Italian, UC Santa Barbara): Renaissance literature and culture, rhetoric, architecture, aging studies.
  • Steve Sohmer (Fleming Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford): Renaissance calendars and Tudor liturgies as they relate to the texts of Shakespeare’s plays.
  • Stanley Stewart (English, UC Riverside): Renaissance English literature; Shakespeare; literature and philosophy.
  • Elizabeth C. Teviotdale (Assistant Director of the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University): Medieval liturgical manuscripts.
  • Nancy van Deusen (Claremont Graduate University): Musicology.
  • Loren J. Weber: Medieval historiography; courtly culture and literature; textual transmission.
  • Robert S. Westman (History and Science Studies, UC San Diego): Early modern science; Copernican studies; astrological culture.

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